Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I use an unordered_map in my current C++ project and have the following problem:

When I insert a pair of objects into the unordered_map, the programm breaks and Windows shows me it's "[...].exe has stopped working", without giving me any information on the console (cmd). Some example code:

#include <unordered_map>

#include <network/server/NetPlayer.h>
#include <gamemodel/Player.h>


int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    NetGame game;
    boost::asio::io_service io_service;

    NetPlayerPtr net(new NetPlayer(io_service, game));
    PlayerPtr player(new Player);

    std::unordered_map<PlayerPtr, NetPlayerPtr> player_map;

    // Here it breaks:
    player_map[player] = net;

    return 0;
}

What I already tried:

I tried wrapping the line with a try-catch, but without success.

Details about the code:

NetPlayerPtr and PlayerPtr are boost::shared_ptr objects, the former contains some boost::asio objects like io_service and socket, the latter contains several custom objects.

I'm compiling with MinGW gcc with C++11 enabled on a 64bit Windows.

If more details are needed, please ask.

share|improve this question
3  
Did you try a debugger? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 21 '12 at 10:52
    
No, I have no expirience with debuggers like GDB (if you're talking about that). –  msiemens Dec 21 '12 at 10:53
7  
@m--s now is your chance! –  user142019 Dec 21 '12 at 10:54
2  
Can we see the specialization of std::hash for PlayerPtr? Also, why are you using a boost::shared_ptr instead of a std::shared_ptr? –  FredOverflow Dec 21 '12 at 11:30
3  
Erm... you have an infinite recursion in your hash<PlayerPtr> :) –  FredOverflow Dec 21 '12 at 16:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Okay, let's look at the code you linked to:

namespace std
{
    template<>
    class hash<Player>
    {
    public:
        size_t operator()(const Player &p) const
        {
            // Hash using boost::uuids::uuid of Player
            boost::hash<boost::uuids::uuid> hasher;
            return hasher(p.id);
        }
    };

    template<>
    class hash<PlayerPtr>
    {
    public:
        size_t operator()(const PlayerPtr &p) const
        {
            return hash<PlayerPtr>()(p);   // infinite recursion
        }
    };
}

You have an inifinite recursion in your hash<PlayerPtr>::operator(). What you probably want is:

return hash<Player>()(*p);

or:

return hash<Player*>()(p->get());

depending on whether you want to identify the player by its internal id or its address.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hmm... I need to supply hash for a variable. Oh well, let's just std::hash it! Genius! :) –  Bartek Banachewicz Dec 21 '12 at 16:27
    
Yeah, that solved it. Thanks a lot! :) –  msiemens Dec 21 '12 at 16:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.