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Say I have two values 0 <= a < b <= 1, how can I chose an x such that a <= x<b with the shortest binary expansion possible?

My approach so far is to take the binary strings of a and b, with the decimal point removed, and at the first place they differ, take the expansion of a up until that point. If there's more of a to consume, strip the last bit. Finally, add 1.

In JavaScript:

var binaryInInterval = function(a, b) {
  if (a < 0 || b > 1 || a >= b) return undefined;

  var i, u, v, x = '';

  a = a.toString(2).replace('.', '');
  b = b.toString(2).replace('.', '');

  for (i = 0; i < Math.max(a.length, b.length); i++) {
    u = parseInt(a.substr(i, 1), 10) || 0;
    v = parseInt(b.substr(i, 1), 10) || 0;

    x += u.toString();
    if (u != v) { 
      if (i + 1 < a.length) x = x.slice(0, -1);
      x += '1';
      break;
    }
  }

  return '0.' + x.substr(1);
};

This works, but I'm not convinced that it's generally correct. Any thoughts?...


EDIT I've already found a case that doesn't work correctly :P

binaryInInterval(0.25, 0.5) = '0.1'

0.25  0.01
0.5   0.1
        ^ Difference
          but a hasn't been fully consumed
          so we strip 00 to 0 before adding 1

EDIT 2 An alternative algorithm would be to iterate through 2^-n and check if any multiple of this fits within the interval. This would be more expensive, however.

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1  
How is this javascript and language-agnostic? –  Jon Clements Dec 21 '12 at 10:59
    
I've implemented the algorithm in JavaScript, for illustrative purposes. I'm interested in the algorithm's correctness, rather than its implementation in any particular language. –  Xophmeister Dec 21 '12 at 11:01
    
if (i + 1 < a.length) x = x.slice(0, -1); Could you explain please? –  closure Dec 21 '12 at 11:37
    
@closure This line strips the last bit from x if there's still more of a to consume. –  Xophmeister Dec 21 '12 at 11:48
1  
@Polmonite Good point: I should have made it clearer. We want to choose x with the shortest binary representation. If we have a = 0.1 and b = 0.25, then in binary, a = 0.000(1100), so a better choice would be x = 0.001 (i.e., 1/8). –  Xophmeister Dec 21 '12 at 12:28
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
function bin(a, b) {
 var den = 1;
 while (true) {
  var bint = Math.floor(b);
  if (bint == b) bint--;
  if (a <= bint) {
   return bint / den;
  }
  den *= 2;
  a *= 2;
  b *= 2;
 }
}

The code iterates through larger and larger power-of-two denominators (den) until it finds one that supports a value that fits in the range.

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice, +1. Nitpick: The OP's example code suggests the return value should be a string containing the actual binary expansion (though I'd argue it makes more sense to return a number, given that both parameters are numbers). –  j_random_hacker Dec 22 '12 at 18:25
    
@j_random_hacker A little toString(2) action changes the return value to a string, though I agree that returning a string doesn't seem particularly useful. –  Raymond Chen Dec 22 '12 at 19:41
    
Changed to accepted, as it's simpler to understand. It's probably faster than all those string manipulations, too! Thanks :) –  Xophmeister Dec 22 '12 at 22:33
    
BTW: The string output is for the sake of the view; however, I agree that number -- at least internally -- is better. –  Xophmeister Dec 22 '12 at 22:33
add comment

It will fail for inputs like a = 0.1, b = 0.100001 (in binary -- i.e. a = 0.5, b = 0.515625 in decimal). The correct answer would be 0.1 in this case, but your algorithm will produce 0.11 instead, which is not only not minimal-length, but greater than b :-(

Your digit-checking looks fine to me -- the problem is that when you have made the (right) decision to end the loop, you construct the wrong output if b's digit string is longer. One easy way to fix it would be to output digits one-at-a-time, as you go along: until you see a different character, you know you must include the current character.

One more tip: I don't know Javascript well, but I think both parseInt() calls are unnecessary, since nothing you do with u or v actually requires arithmetic.

[EDIT]

Here is some example digit-at-a-time code that incorporates a few other considerations:

var binaryInInterval = function(a, b) {
  if (a < 0 || b > 1 || a >= b) return undefined;

  if (a == 0) return '0';  // Special: only number that can end with a 0

  var i, j, u, v, x = '';

  a = a.toString(2).replace('.', '');
  b = b.toString(2).replace('.', '');

  for (i = 0; i < Math.min(a.length, b.length); i++) {
    u = a.substr(i, 1);
    v = b.substr(i, 1);

    if (u != v) {
      // We know that u must be '0' and v must be '1'.
      // We therefore also know that u must have at least 1 more '1' digit,
      // since you cannot have a '0' as the last digit.
      if (i < b.length - 1) {
        // b has more digits, meaning it must
        // have more '1' digits, meaning it must be larger than
        // x if we add a '1' here, so it's safe to do that and stop.
        x += '1';     // This is >= a, because we know u = '0'.
      } else {
        // To ensure x is >= a, we need to look for the first
        // '0' in a from this point on, change it to a '1',
        // and stop.  If a only contains '1's from here on out,
        // it suffices to copy them, and not bother appending a '1'.
        x += '0';
        for (j = i + 1; j < a.length; ++j) {
          if (a.substr(j, 1) == '0') {
            break;
          }
        }
      }
      break;  // We're done.  Fall through to fix the binary point.
    } else {
      x += u;    // Business as usual.
    }
  }

  // If we make it to here, it must be because either (1) we hit a
  // different digit, in which case we have prepared an x that is correct
  // except for the binary point, or (2) a and b agree on all
  // their leftmost min(len(a), len(b)) digits.  For (2), it must therefore be
  // that b has more digits (and thus more '1' digits), because if a
  // had more it would necessarily be larger than b, which is impossible.
  // In this case, x will simply be a.
  // So in both cases (1) and (2), all we need to do is fix the binary point.
  if (x.length > 1) x = '0.' + x.substr(1);
  return x;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer :) Could you please expand it somewhat: I don't really see what context your suggested fix should be applied to? (The parseInt was a relic from former attempts, when I was doing bit twiddling and checking for falseiness!) –  Xophmeister Dec 21 '12 at 12:44
    
@Xophmeister: I've added some (untested) Javascript digit-at-a-time code. Notice that we now only loop till the minimum length. In writing this I hit upon a corner case I hadn't thought of -- the case where a is longer than b and they disagree on b's last digit needs special attention! E.g. a = 0.011011110111001, b = 0.0111 should have the answer x = 0.011011111. –  j_random_hacker Dec 21 '12 at 16:01
    
Nice one, @j_random_hacker Your algorithm works except for when a = 0 or b = 1. I'll see if I can tease those out... Otherwise, consider this accepted :) –  Xophmeister Dec 21 '12 at 18:10
    
...Changing your initialisation of x and i and the normalisation of a and b (i.e., removing the decimal point) back to how I had originally defined them fixes that problem :) –  Xophmeister Dec 21 '12 at 18:17
    
@Xophmeister: Whoops, I think those are fixed now. But I notice closure's code uses !== and === for some comparisons -- you might want to check whether my use of != and == is correct. –  j_random_hacker Dec 21 '12 at 18:46
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I am posting another version of the code. That tries to fix the known issues:

  var binaryInIntervalNew = function(inpA, inpB) {

    if (inpA < 0 || inpB > 1 || inpA >= inpB) return undefined;

    var i, u, v, x = '';

    a = inpA.toString(2).split('.');
    b = inpB.toString(2).split('.');

    a = a[a.length - 1];
    b = b[b.length - 1];

    for (i = 0; i < Math.min(a.length, b.length); i++) {

      u = a.substr(i, 1);
      v = b.substr(i, 1);

      if (u !== v) {
        // x cannot become equal to b, let us verify that
        if ((i+1) === b.length) {
          x += '01';
        } else {
          x += '1';
        }
        break;
      } else {
        x += u;
      }
      // console.log("x: " + x + " i:" + i);
    }

    x = '0.' + x;
    return parseFloat(x);
  };

A short function to test both functions:

function bin(a, b) {
  console.log("a:" + a.toString(2));
  console.log("b:" + b.toString(2));
  if (binaryInIntervalNew) console.log("binaryInIntervalNew: " + binaryInIntervalNew(a, b));
  if (binaryInInterval) console.log("binaryInInterval: " + binaryInInterval(a, b));
}

Now few results:

bin(1/16, 1/4);
a:0.0001 
b:0.01
binaryInIntervalNew: 0.001
binaryInInterval: 0.01

bin(.1, .2);
a:0.0001100110011001100110011001100110011001100110011001101 
b:0.001100110011001100110011001100110011001100110011001101
binaryInIntervalNew: 0.001
binaryInInterval: 0.001

bin(1/4, 1/2);
a:0.01 b:0.1
b:0.1
binaryInIntervalNew: 0.01
binaryInInterval: 0.1

bin(.2, .5);
a:0.001100110011001100110011001100110011001100110011001101 b:0.1
b:0.1
binaryInIntervalNew: 0.01
binaryInInterval: 0.1

bin(.0011, .1);
a:0.00000000010010000001011011110000000001101000110110111000101111 b:0.0001100110011001100110011001100110011001100110011001101
b:0.0001100110011001100110011001100110011001100110011001101
binaryInIntervalNew: 0.0001
binaryInInterval: 0.0001
share|improve this answer
    
@ Xophmeister: Please have a look and let me know if something missing. I have tried incorporating solution to all the issues that I have gathered here. –  closure Dec 21 '12 at 17:08
    
I believe this will fail for e.g. a = 0.0011, b = 0.1. When b is shorter than a and different on its last digit, you need to scan through the rest of a, looking for its first 0 (see my code). –  j_random_hacker Dec 21 '12 at 17:09
    
@j_random_hacker: The answer is 0.0001. Both original and new algoritms get the same answer. What do you get with your algoritm? –  closure Dec 21 '12 at 17:38
1  
When a = 0.0011 and b = 0.1, one would expect a solution of 0.01. –  Xophmeister Dec 21 '12 at 18:01
    
@Xophmeister: I think in your above statement a and b are in binary, while what j_random_hacker had put were decimal. Let me test this and update the result for your test case. –  closure Dec 21 '12 at 18:08
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