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Similar things have been asked before, but I was unable to solve my current problem with any of these answers.

Situation:

CustomType *Object;
BOOL (^doAverage)(CustomType *, int, int) = ^(CustomType *Trigger, int Total, int Pulse) {
    //Calculate Average from Total and Pulse
    Total /= Pulse;
    [Trigger setValue:Total];
};

Object = [CustomType CreateObject]; //Autoreleased Object
[Object addCallback:^{ return doAverage(Object, 56, 32); }];
[Array addObject:Object];       //Adds to collection.

The issue at hand is a retain cycle as you probably already figured.
Object keeps a reference to the block in addCallback, and the block doAverage retains the reference to Object.

Using an instance variable is out of the question, because I want to reuse the variable Object for multiple objects. (Temporary variable).
Using a local variable results in the retain count.
And using __block CustomType *Object doesn't work either, because for whatever reason Trigger ends up as nil once the callback is actually called.

Any ideas?

I have a makeshift solution, but it seems rather...hacky.

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Just to point it out, always make objects lowercase, and you are missing a pointer in the first line. –  NSAddict Dec 21 '12 at 12:13
    
@NSAddict Thanks for the pointer, I fixed the issue. Regarding the lowercase...why? You see, I've 'grown up' with C++ and thereby favour the CamelCase notation. (Capital letter with each starting word) –  ATaylor Dec 21 '12 at 12:14
1  
This is standard in most programming languages. Classes > Starting with upper-case, variables > starting lower-case, it's a lot more readable, because you can call methods on classes and objects. –  NSAddict Dec 21 '12 at 12:17
1  
@NSAddict Ah, I see. I shall keep it in mind for the future, for now, please bear with me. And thank you. –  ATaylor Dec 21 '12 at 12:17
1  
oh camel-case is important too, it's just about the first character –  NSAddict Dec 21 '12 at 12:18
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5 Answers

Several things. First, I would like to see your addCallback: method. It's possible that you've implemented it incorrectly. For example, if you store a block for use later, you must copy it. If it's incorrect, all bets are off on the rest of the stuff.

And using __block CustomType *Object doesn't work either, because for whatever reason Trigger ends up as nil once the callback is actually called.

So if it's nil, then that means you assigned nil to Object somewhere.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I noticed that 'copy' is imperative. Which is why addCallback creates an object (a container) saves the reference with [Block copy]. And yes, assigning a 'nil' value is well possible. What I want however is a 'non-retained copy of the object' in question, which will be 'lost' once the corresponding object is deallocated. –  ATaylor Dec 22 '12 at 7:04
    
@ATaylor: are you doing something like doing the addCallback inside a loop, but declared the __block variable outside of the loop? If so, then all the blocks will refer to the same __block variable, which will cause problems if the value of that variable changes between iterations of the loop. If you are doing something like this, you would want to put the __block variable inside the loop –  newacct Dec 23 '12 at 9:45
    
No, but it's a similar behaviour. I have a list of statements, who all add to the same array, using the same variable. Though this gives me the idea, that an array of __block-variables may well be the solution...however this seems awfully complicated for such a simple task...though just now another idea arises. What would happen, if I declared another block named addWithCallback, which takes both the object as well as the block in question? –  ATaylor Dec 24 '12 at 6:19
    
@ATaylor: try this: 1) temporarily do another copy of the block you pass to addCallback: i.e. addCallback:[[^{ ... } copy] autorelease] to see if it changes anything, in case you are not copying the block right. 2) get rid of the __block on Object and add a __block CustomType *tmp = Object; right before the addCallback line, and then change that block from ^{ return doAverage(Object, 56, 32); } to ^{ return doAverage(tmp, 56, 32); }. This will guarantee that that block variable is only used by that block. –  newacct Dec 24 '12 at 20:41
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

As already stated, this answer is rather hacky and I'd be very happy if someone could point me in a better direction.
Apparently a primitive datatype in combination with a __block variable does the trick, though this is a bit complicated.

void *Ptr;                //Variable for Block.
__block CustomType *Obj;  //Function variable, mutable by block.
BOOL (^doAverage)(void *, int, int) = ^(void *Trigger, int Total, int Pulse) {
    CustomType *T = (CustomType *)Trigger;  //Conversion
    //Calculate Average from Total and Pulse
    Total /= Pulse;
    [T setValue:Total];
};

//Convenience method.
CustomObject *(^Add)(CustomObject *) = ^(CustomObject *)NewObject {
    [Array addObject:NewObject];
    Obj = NewObject; //Assigns to the local block-Variable.
    return Obj;
};

Ptr = Add([CustomObject CreateObject]); //Creates the Object, and adds it to the array.
[Obj addCallback:^{ return doAverage(Ptr, 56, 32); }];

Since Ptr is a primitive type, it will NOT be retained and does not have to be released. At the same time, it assumes the address of the Object in question and thereby doubles as it.

Once the object is released, so is the block with the pointer and everything is good. Once the block is called, the pointer needs to be cast to the type in question, but that's only a minor problem.

Add is optional of course, but I don't like the syntax Ptr = Obj = [CustomObject CreateObject];

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this is not even valid code. The Add block has a return type, but there is no return in the body –  newacct Dec 22 '12 at 0:54
    
@newacct I beg your forgiveness. I must have forgotten the return statement while copying the code. –  ATaylor Dec 22 '12 at 7:00
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CustomType *Object;
BOOL (^doAverage)(CustomType *, int, int) = ^(CustomType *Trigger, int Total, int Pulse) {
//Calculate Average from Total and Pulse
Total /= Pulse;
[Trigger setValue:Total];
};

Object = [CustomType CreateObject]; //Autoreleased Object
[Object addCallback:^{ return doAverage(Object, 56, 32); }];

Taylor said -> "What I want however is a 'non-retained copy of the object' in question, which will be 'lost' once the corresponding object is deallocated."

This code doesn't seem to cause a retain-cyle unless you use copy on or inside of addCallback([^{}copy]);..

Where is it exactly the copy is used in your code? Inside of addCallback? if this is like:

addCallback(o) {

o = [o copy];
o();

then do a [o release]; when you done with a block object.. do not release it in dealloc()
} 

if you have never used copy anywhere, nothing to be worried about.. It all happens in the stack that means no retain cyles at all unless it is not a global one!

In case there is a retail-cyle, do not use __block __weak etc instead do release whatever object it is in the end of the block.. and bear in mind that no copy no retain cycle..

share|improve this answer
    
I am using 'copy' in addCallback though, simply because otherwise the block would be deallocated before I use it. Though I guess a 'one-shot' callback would probably do the trick. (Use once and release right afterwards). Thank you for your input. –  ATaylor Jan 14 '13 at 6:28
    
so using copy within your callback is the right form of doing it.. copy it, call it and release the block when you are done that will release the Object right away.. Where did you see a retain cycle in this scheme is not clear to me? It is not the runtime what creates retain cyles but the designer/coder.. Release "Object' after adding it to the callback and use dispatch_async(0,{ block(); [block release]}); to see the result it will even work without copying it if it is a on the fly operation (not persistent).. ultimate solution to retain cycles the blocks do is intermediate obj, thnx –  DeniziOS Jan 14 '13 at 6:55
    
Yeah, that's the point. I didn't release it right after use, but when I was done with the object that contained the callback, which was retained by the block...and meh, computers...if only they did what I want them to do, instead of what I tell them to do, right? :) –  ATaylor Jan 14 '13 at 7:10
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If your deployment target is at least iOS 5 (or OS X 10.7), you can use "zeroing weak references":

CustomType *object = [CustomType makeObject];
__weak CustomType *weakObject = object;
[object addCallback:^{
    CustomType *strongObject = weakObject;
    if (strongObject)
        return doAverage(weakObject, 56, 32);
    else
        return 0;
}];

(I have used a makeObject instead of CreateObject for the name of the "factory method", because methods with "create" in their name are expected to return a (+1) retain count object, not an autoreleased object.)

The __weak reference does not increment the retain count, therefore no retain cycle is created. If the object is destroyed because the last strong reference to it is gone, then weakSelf is set to nil. Inside the block a strong reference is created, which either points to the object, if it still exists, or is nil, if it does not exist anymore.

If I understand you code correctly, the callback will not be called if the object has been released. In that case a __unsafe_unretained reference is sufficient (which works also on iOS 4):

CustomType *object = [CustomType makeObject];
__unsafe_unretained CustomType *unsafeObject = object;
[object addCallback:^{
    return doAverage(unsafeObject, 56, 32);
}];
share|improve this answer
    
assuming he's using ARC, that is –  newacct Dec 22 '12 at 0:51
    
@newacct: Yes, I have assumed that. __unsafe_unretained is available without ARC, but would probably not help here. –  Martin R Dec 22 '12 at 2:44
    
__unsafe_unretained here will not do what you want under MRC. It will still be retained. You need __block under MRC instead. –  newacct Dec 22 '12 at 3:09
    
Sorry, I'm not using ARC. I like to keep my stuff 'manual' and 'under control'. (Plus, I'd need to refactor the entire code if I was to use ARC now) –  ATaylor Dec 22 '12 at 7:05
    
@ATaylor: Them my answer will probably not help. I am so used to ARC that I did not think of MRC when trying to solve your problem. –  Martin R Dec 22 '12 at 7:15
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Try declaring the Object as

__weak CustomType *Object
share|improve this answer
2  
XCode throws me a warning: __weak attribute cannot be specified on an automatic variable. –  ATaylor Dec 21 '12 at 12:02
    
This will release the object as soon at it has been assigned. Or because it's an autoreleased object, as soon as it has been autoreleased. –  NSAddict Dec 21 '12 at 12:11
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