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The code:

// test2.cpp

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

struct test_class
{
    test_class() = default;

    test_class(const test_class& t)
    {
        std::cout << "Copied" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    test_class a;
    std::vector<test_class> v;

    for (int i = 0; i < 5; ++i) {
        v.push_back(a);
        std::cout << std::endl;
    }
}

The behaviour:

$ g++ --version | grep g++
g++ (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.7.2-2ubuntu1) 4.7.2
$ g++ -std=c++11 test2.cpp
$ ./a.out
Copied

Copied
Copied

Copied
Copied
Copied

Copied

Copied
Copied
Copied
Copied
Copied

Each push_back performs an "undefined" number of copies (where only one copy must be performed).

What the hell is going on here?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The vector allocates continuous memory just like an array. If there is no more space at the end of the memory it has to reallocate the whole vector. After this it will copy the elements from the old place to the new and delete the old.

You can initialize it to be able to hold at least 5 elements, so there wil be no memory allocation and copy in your example:

std::vector<test_class> v(5);
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A push_back can cause the vector to grow beyond its allocated storage, which causes re-allocation, which causes the contents to be copied.

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