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Is it possible to do something like having different Generic Parameter type (U) for a function return value, while already having another generic parameter type T for local parameter?

I have tried:

private static U someMethod <T,U>(T type1, Stream s)

and

private static U someMethod <T><U>(T type1, Stream s)

Edit: We agreed to try:

private static U someMethod <T,U>(T type1, Stream s)

public static T someMethodParent<T>(Stream stream)
{

   U something = someMethod(type1, stream);  

      ...
}
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closed as not a real question by Fuex, Damien_The_Unbeliever, BlackBear, DaveRandom, Andy Hayden Dec 21 '12 at 17:49

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

8  
What error did you get? Your first version looks okay. –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Dec 21 '12 at 12:04
2  
private static U someMethod <T,U>(T type1, Stream s) { return default(U); } Compiles fine to me. –  Mir Dec 21 '12 at 12:05
1  
what does 'they don't work' mean, 1st one should compile and 'work' –  Bond Dec 21 '12 at 12:05
2  
If you only changed the method signature then you would get errors because you'll need to change all the calls to specify what U is. You probably got away with not specifying T because it is infered from what you pass in to the method, but U has to be explicitly stated. –  juharr Dec 21 '12 at 12:12
1  
"while already having another generic parameter " - if this is an existing method and you've been relying on Type inference then the inference will no longer work - you'll need to specify types at each call site (it has no means to deduce U) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Dec 21 '12 at 12:13

5 Answers 5

private static U someMethod <T,U>(T type1, Stream s) is a correct syntax.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/twcad0zb%28v=vs.80%29.aspx

As JavaSa stated in the comments, you need to provide the actual types if they cannot be inferred form the usage, so

private static U someMethodParent<T>(T Type1, Stream s)
{
    return someMethod<T, ConcreteTypeConvertibleToU>(type1, s);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok the problem is, I call someMethod() from someMethodParent() which signature is only with <T> and without U, and I mustn't refactor the someMethodParent(). –  JavaSa Dec 21 '12 at 12:12
1  
The type arguments for method someMethod()<T,U>(T, System.IO.Stream)' cannot be inferred from the usage. Try specifying the type arguments explicitly. –  JavaSa Dec 21 '12 at 12:14

This should work.

private static U someMethod<T, U>(T type1, Stream s)
{
   return default(U);
}
share|improve this answer
    
It works on my pc. What version of .Net and VS are you using? –  CodingBarfield Dec 21 '12 at 12:07
    
.Net 4 and VS 2010, please see my problem on comment one answer above –  JavaSa Dec 21 '12 at 12:15
1  
@JavaSa - Side note - try not to refer to answers by their order on here - due to the way voting works, the "answer above" could (in theory) change between you writing a comment and the other person viewing this question again. You can include links in comments (see the FAQ for how), or just use the other answerer's name. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Dec 21 '12 at 12:20

this works:

private static TOutput someMethod<TInput, TOutput>(TInput from);

Loook at MSDN

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Ok, after reading all the comments, it looks to me like you have two options...

  1. Explicitly specify the return type you need from someMethod in the body of someMethodParent

    public static T someMethodParent<T>(Stream stream)
    {
        TheTypeYouWant something = someMethod<T, TheTypeYouWant>(type1, stream);
        ...
        return Default(T);
    }
    
  2. Use object as the return type for someMethod in the body of someMethodParent, but you'll still need to cast to a useable type

    public static T someMethodParent<T>(Stream stream)
    {
        object something = someMethod<T, object>(type1, stream);
        ...
        TheTypeYouNeed x = (TheTypeYouNeed) something;
        // Use x in your calculations
        ...
        return Default(T);
    }
    

Both of which where mentioned in comments to other answers, but without examples.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but it don't work, was trying this according to Feux new answer, got error which U or TheTypeYouWant as in your answer is unrecognizable. Not that in this answer we assume MyClass don't have generic parameter in its definition, and that the U parameter is only in the someMethod as you and Feux wrote –  JavaSa Dec 21 '12 at 13:45
    
Now I will try testing the second approach –  JavaSa Dec 21 '12 at 13:51
    
Sounds like there could be a problem in the implementation of someMethod. Perhaps not casting the return to U properly. –  Kevin Dec 21 '12 at 14:12
    
Please see my screen shot here: snag.gy/VBEP8.jpg This is almost without implementation :) –  JavaSa Dec 21 '12 at 14:17
    
I'm at work, the snag.gy site is blocked here so I can't see the screenshot. –  Kevin Dec 21 '12 at 14:23

In order to use U in someMethodParent it has to be specified, just like you did in someMethod e.g.

public static T someMethodParent<T, U>(T type1, Stream stream)

Now I can use U in the method body as my return type for someMethod...

{
    U something = someMethod<T, U>(type1, stream);
    return Default(T);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please see my constraint in Feux's answer that I can't modify the parent method or the class contain it. –  JavaSa Dec 21 '12 at 13:07
    
Then you may be screwed, what you are showing in the original question should not even compile e.g. U something = someMethod(type1, stream); should tell you that U is not defined in this context. (See juharr's comment to original question) –  Kevin Dec 21 '12 at 13:11

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