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The below code doesn't execute even after notifying the current thread (using this).

public synchronized void test() {
    String str = new String();
    try {
        System.out.println("Test1");
        this.wait();
        this.notifyAll();
        System.out.println("Test2");
    } catch (Exception e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        System.out.println("Inside exception");
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
 }

I get only Test1 as output on the console.

In, the second case I get the exception if I call the wait method on string object. The reason is because the string class object str doesn't hold lock on current object. But I wonder what does str.wait() actually means ?

public synchronized void test() {
    String str = "ABC";
    try {
        System.out.println("Test1");
        str.wait();
        str.notifyAll();
        System.out.println("Test2");
    } catch (Exception e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        System.out.println("Ins");
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
 }

Console Output:

> Test1  
java.lang.IllegalMonitorStateException
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Mark Rotteveel, Mario Sannum, Ragunath Jawahar, Andy Hayden, Stewbob Dec 21 '12 at 15:34

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

Not sure what you expected from that code:

  1. In your first example, wait does what it says: it waits, so notifyAll is never called
  2. In the second example, you can't call wait on an object without holding the monitor of that object first. So you would need to be in a synchronized(str) block to avoid the exception. But you would still have the same issue as in 1.

The main use case of wait and notify is inter-thread communication, i.e. one thread waits and another thread notifies that waiting threads can wake up. In your case the same thread is at both ends of the communication channel which does not work.

share|improve this answer
2  
And even if the second example would get a lock on the str object, it would result in the same as the first example. – Simon Forsberg Dec 21 '12 at 12:20
    
I have clarified that. – assylias Dec 21 '12 at 12:21
    
Now your answer explains it all. +1 – Simon Forsberg Dec 21 '12 at 12:22
    
Thank you so much. It helps ! – user1921476 Dec 21 '12 at 12:51
    
+1 spot on..... – Bohemian Dec 21 '12 at 12:59

you should not call wait and notify one after the other in the same thread. They should be executed from different threads. If you wait for something, the control is not going further in that thread until some other thread is going to notify it

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You should learn how to use wait() and notify() properly : from Effective Java (Josh Bloch) :

// The standard idiom for using the wait method
synchronized (obj) {
    while (<condition does not hold>)
    obj.wait(); // (Releases lock, and reacquires on wakeup)
    ... // Perform action appropriate to condition
}

This makes the current thread properly wait for a condition to become true. Other threads should call notify() or notifyAll() when this condition becomes true.

Yet the more important advice from Josh is : Prefer concurrency utilities to waitand notify

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Concerning your first case: wait causes your current thread to wait until another thread invokes the notify() method or the notifyAll() method. So notify all will never be called unless you do it within another thread.

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In your first snippet, the thread is enqueued to wait for the instance when you call wait. The notifyAll is not executed, because the tread is already waiting.

The notify needs to be executed on another tread.

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