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I try to figure out how I can access a static method within CallMe<T>() of class DoSomething. Is reflection the only solution here? I do not want to instantiate an object of type MyAction. Also if doing it through reflection is there a way to create the method through reflection within the method CallMe<T>() just once and then calling it many times to perform multiple operations on the same "reflected" method? Or is there any better way than through reflection? I basically want to create template implementation style classes such as MyAction that define how byte[] DoThis(string text) performs its duty. The AskForSomething() will then specify which template is being used and according to that the CallMe<T>() will go about its work.

    public class AskSomething
    {
        public void AskForSomething()
        {
            DoSomething doSomething = new DoSomething();
            doSomething.CallMe<MyAction>();
        }
    }

    public class DoSomething
    {
        public void CallMe<T>()
        {
            Type type = typeof(T);

            //Question: How can I access 'DoThis(string text)' here?
            //Most likely by reflection? 
        }
    }

    public class MyAction
    {
        public static byte[] DoThis(string text)
        {
            byte[] ret = new byte[0]; //mock just to denote something is done and out comes a byte array

            return ret;
        }
    }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Define an interface with DoThis, have MyAction implement it, and constrain the T type parameter to be an instance of it with where T : IMyInterface

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1  
Note I am assuming you don't mean to have DoThis as a static method.. –  Kieren Johnstone Dec 21 '12 at 12:31
    
+1 I was trying to explain why this doesn't work, but it's apparently much simpler just to describe how to make it work... –  Rawling Dec 21 '12 at 12:32
    
An interface is the correct way to do this, but if you must have the DoThis as a static method then you will have to use reflection. –  Ross Dargan Dec 21 '12 at 12:35
    
@KierenJohnstone, ok so an interface is the way to go it seems. But I assume it would mean I have to pass in an instance of T, correct? –  Matt Wolf Dec 21 '12 at 14:59
1  
new T().DoThis("abc"), or indeed you can pass in an instance. You would need to constrain with where T : IMyInterface, new() to ensure it has a parameterless constructor –  Kieren Johnstone Dec 21 '12 at 15:44

If your DoThis method needs to be static you can also change your CallMe method to the following:

public void CallMe(Func<string, byte[]> action)
{
    byte[] result = action("input");
}

Now you can pass a reference to a function to the CallMe method like this:

 doSomething.CallMe(MyAction.DoThis);
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is this similar to a delegate or is a delegate? –  Matt Wolf Dec 21 '12 at 15:02
    
Yes this a delegate. You can use this delegate to represent a method that can be passed as a parameter without explicitly declaring a custom delegate (see Func<T, TResult> Delegate) –  Wouter de Kort Dec 21 '12 at 15:12
    
thanks for explaining, would you happen to know by chance what the performance difference is between a delegate and interface implementation? I remember having come across a question similar to this on SO but I can't find it anymore. –  Matt Wolf Dec 21 '12 at 15:19
    
Here is the stackoverflow question that discussed interfaces vs delegates But before worrying about performance this is a nice read: Which is faster? –  Wouter de Kort Dec 21 '12 at 15:21
    
Thanks thats exactly what I came across before, also thanks for the recommendation to performance profile myself if performance is indeed an issue (here it is, I process about 15-20 million items per second, so even differences in the microsecond realm add up.). –  Matt Wolf Dec 21 '12 at 15:28

Based on the fact that "DoThis" doesn't have to be static you can achieve this with the following:-

using System;

namespace ConsoleApplication3
{
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        DoSomething doSomething = new DoSomething();
        doSomething.CallMe<MyAction>();

    }
}
public class DoSomething
{
    public void CallMe<T>() where T : IMyAction
    {
       IMyAction action =  (IMyAction)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T));

       var result = action.DoThis("value");            
    }
}

public interface IMyAction
{
    byte[] DoThis(string text);
}

public class MyAction : IMyAction
{
    public byte[] DoThis(string text)
    {
        byte[] ret = new byte[0]; //mock just to denote something is done and out comes a byte array

        return ret;
    }
}
}

Not sure I'd recommend this approach but it works! (for example if there is no default constructor this will fail).

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Is this a reflection approach? Btw, I think you need to call doSomething.CallMe<MyAction>() instead of doSomething.CallMe(), correct? –  Matt Wolf Dec 21 '12 at 15:17
    
yes, the Activator.CreateInstance is effectively reflection. You can use it multiple times if that makes sense (but remember the method CallMe could be called with a different type than the previous call) –  Ross Dargan Dec 21 '12 at 15:20
    
of course otherwise I guess the question would be moot if it was not intended to have T be different types that implement IMyAction. Thanks though for pointing out. –  Matt Wolf Dec 21 '12 at 15:38
  public class DoSomething
  {
    class Cache<T>
    {
      public readonly static Func<string, byte[]> action = (Func<string, byte[]>)Delegate.CreateDelegate(typeof(Func<string, byte[]>), typeof(T).GetMethod("DoThis"));
    }
    public void CallMe<T>()
    {
      Cache<T>.action("text");
    }
  }
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Technically correct, impossibly crap to maintain and design around of course :) –  Kieren Johnstone Dec 21 '12 at 13:55
    
@KierenJohnstone We are not looking for an easy way –  DarkGray Dec 21 '12 at 14:13
    
What? Yes, all software developers should always be looking for an easy way. You can use a pair of scissors to hammer in a nail - someone might even ask, what's the best pair of scissors to hammer in a nail - but of course, every time, you should use a hammer.. –  Kieren Johnstone Dec 21 '12 at 14:28
    
@DarkGray, while the interface solution looks more suitable in this case, do you mind explaining how your solution would work in case I decide to use reflection in the future (I am pretty fresh to programming). How would I now call this invoked method within a loop that iterates a million times without having to invoke the method again on each iteration? That was something I think I already brought up in the original question. –  Matt Wolf Dec 21 '12 at 14:53
    
@KierenJohnstone It's right but boring –  DarkGray Dec 21 '12 at 15:51

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