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I have a method in a singleton class that need to use the .NET System. Random(), since the method is called in a multi-threaded environment I can't create it only once and declare it statically, but I have to create a Random() object each time the method is called. Since Random() default seed is based on the clock ticks it is not random enough in my senario. To create a better seed I have looked into several methods and have figured the following one is the best, but there may be other (faster/better) ways of doing this that I would like to know about.

Random rnd = new Random(BitConverter.ToInt32(Guid.NewGuid().ToByteArray(), 0));
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4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Instead of trying to come up with a better seed yourself, use System.Security.Cryptography.RandomNumberGenerator.

It uses a seed based on a complex algorithm that involves a lot of different environment variables. System time is one of those, as is IIRC the MAC address of your NIC, etc.

It is also considered a 'more random' algorithm than the one implemented by the Random class.

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9  
Minor clarification: As RandomNumberGenerator is an abstract class, he'd actually use System.Security.Cryptography.RNGCryptoServiceProvider And he should be sure that if his singleton allows multiple simultaneous users (getInstance isn't inherently synchronized), that he protects usage of the non-static members of RNGCryptoServiceProvider, since they're not thread-safe. –  CPerkins Sep 9 '09 at 11:32
    
@CPerkins: Good points - thanks! –  Mark Seemann Sep 9 '09 at 11:43
    
@CPerkins: That is a major clarification, thanks. –  I. J. Kennedy Mar 2 '11 at 2:15

Here is my implementation. Thread-safe with no locking.

public static class StrongRandom
{
    [ThreadStatic]
    private static Random _random;

    public static int Next(int inclusiveLowerBound, int inclusiveUpperBound)
    {
        if (_random == null)
        {
            var cryptoResult = new byte[4];
            new RNGCryptoServiceProvider().GetBytes(cryptoResult);

            int seed = BitConverter.ToInt32(cryptoResult, 0);

            _random = new Random(seed);
        }

        // upper bound of Random.Next is exclusive
        int exclusiveUpperBound = inclusiveUpperBound + 1;
        return _random.Next(inclusiveLowerBound, exclusiveUpperBound);
    }
}
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Create it statically and use a lock to make it thread safe:

public static class RandomProvider {

   private static Random _rnd = new Random();
   private static object _sync = new object();

   public static int Next() {
      lock (_sync) {
         return _rnd.Next();
      }
   }

   public static int Next(int max) {
      lock (_sync) {
         return _rnd.Next(max);
      }
   }

   public static int Next(int min, int max) {
      lock (_sync) {
         return _rnd.Next(min, max);
      }
   }

}

If you still need a Random object in each thread for some reason, you could use the static class to seed them:

Random r = new Random(RandomProvider.Next() ^ Environment.TickCount);
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Using a shared random to seed the threadlocal randoms, why didn't i think of that. The lock approach will lead to a lot of lock contention for large crunching excercises though, that will be very slow. –  gjvdkamp Jul 2 '12 at 8:45
    
Why the downvote? If you don't explain what you think is wrong, it can't improve the answer. –  Guffa Oct 26 '12 at 17:10

Example program that makes use of RNGCryptoServiceProvider to generate random numbers

class Program
{

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int i;
        byte bRandom;
        String sL;
        for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            bRandom = GetRandom();
            sL = string.Format("Random Number: {0}", bRandom);
            Console.WriteLine(sL);
         }
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    public static byte GetRandom()
    {
        RNGCryptoServiceProvider rngCsp = new RNGCryptoServiceProvider();
        // Create a byte array to hold the random value.
        byte[] randomNumber = new byte[1];

        rngCsp.GetBytes(randomNumber);

        return randomNumber[0];

    }
}
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