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    String []lines = System.IO.File.ReadAllLines(path);
    foreach (String line in lines)
    {
        line.Trim();
    }

Obviously this doesn't work because String.Trim returns the Trimmed version as a new String. And you can't do line = line.Trim(). So is the only way to do this an old-school for loop?

    for(int i=0;i<lines.Length;++i)
    {
        lines[i] = lines[i].Trim();
    }

Note I am restricted to Visual Studio 2005 i.e. .Net 2.0

share|improve this question
    
Are you asking how to make it better? –  Bali C Dec 21 '12 at 13:24
    
and so the question is? –  Rudi Visser Dec 21 '12 at 13:24
    
Question is Is the only way to do this an old-school for loop? You can't see it? –  Soner Gönül Dec 21 '12 at 13:25
1  
I totally didn't see is :D –  Rudi Visser Dec 21 '12 at 13:26
    
No, the for loop is not the only way, but it's probably the best way. –  phoog Dec 21 '12 at 22:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted
lines.Select(l => l.Trim()).ToArray();

Alternatively, for .NET 2.0:

static IEnumerable<string> GetTrimmed(IEnumerable<string> array)
{
    foreach (var s in array)
        yield return s.Trim();
}

Used through:

lines = new List<string>(GetTrimmed(lines)).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
3  
I missed the possibly crucial .NET 2 tag initially; all this lambda stuff isn't available is it? –  Mr. Boy Dec 21 '12 at 13:28
    
You are right, the method is not available in .NET 2.0. –  Eve Dec 21 '12 at 13:30
    
I have added an example of usage in .NET 2.0. –  Eve Dec 21 '12 at 13:39
    
@Eve, I added my answer with List<string> before this edit. :-) –  Ionică Bizău Dec 21 '12 at 13:42
    
it seems to me that the for loop in the question is simpler and cleaner (less GC pressure) than the approach offered here. –  phoog Dec 21 '12 at 22:43

"So is the only way to do this an old-school for loop?" Yes, on .NET 2 you have no Linq stuff. But to be honest, the "old-school for loop" is also the most efficient, most readable and shortest approach. So what's the problem?

for(int i = 0; i < lines.Length; i++)
    lines[i] = lines[i].Trim();
share|improve this answer
    
it's not a problem, simply a quest for knowledge –  Mr. Boy Dec 21 '12 at 14:51

According to this, we have List<string> in .NET 2.0.

So, try with List<string>.

String []lines = System.IO.File.ReadAllLines(path);

List<string> yourLinesTrimed = new List<string>;
foreach (String line in lines)
{
        yourLinesTrimed.Add(line.Trim());
}

Then you can convert the List<string> in an array, using ToArray().

Let's build a method that does this:

 public String[] TrimAnArray(String[] lines)
 {
     List<string> yourLinesTrimed = new List<string>;
     foreach (String line in lines)
     {
         yourLinesTrimed.Add(line.Trim());
     }
     return yourLinesTrimed.ToArray();
 }
share|improve this answer
    
.Add(line.Trim()) maybe? –  Geeo Dec 21 '12 at 13:30
    
Ups, thank you! Edited. –  Ionică Bizău Dec 21 '12 at 13:30

You could also use LINQ:

String []lines = System.IO.File.ReadAllLines(path)
                .Select(line => line.Trim())
                .ToArray();

EDIT:

If you are limited to .NET 2.0, then I would stick with the for-loop as you have done in your second code sample. I don't think there are much better ways of doing it, a for-loop is efficient enough. There are of course some workarounds for making LINQ work in .NET 2.0, but I don't think it's worth the trouble.

share|improve this answer
    
@John Oh, sorry, missed that it is .net 2.0 you are using. But there are workarounds to use LINQ in .Net 2.0, but I'd rather use the for-loop. –  Mario Dec 21 '12 at 13:29
    
.NET 2.0 doesn't support LINQ queries. –  Soner Gönül Dec 21 '12 at 13:29

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