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I have a Maven project which is used as a library in other projects. The setup is pretty standard: src/main with the library code, src/test with test cases for src/main.

Let's assume I have a project foo which depends in this library. foo also has test cases. To help writing tests in foo for code that uses my library, I'd like to give foo a support framework to write tests (like setting up a mock environment).

Where can I put this support code?

  • It shouldn't go into src/main because it's not meant to go into production.
  • It can't go into src/test because creating a dependency from foo's tests to the tests of the library adds too much junk to the classpath (like logback-test.xml config files, tests which are never executed, ...).

I could put the code into a new module but it's tightly coupled with the code in src/main, so I'd like to keep it in the same project (would also allow the test support code to access package private fields and methods).

Also, the code in src/test should have access to it, so that I can use it to write my own unit tests.

What are my options with Maven to keep this in the same project but still separate it cleanly from both src/main and src/test? Can I somehow create a third output JAR for, say, src/test-support? Or should I put the code into src/test and then use filters in the JAR plugin to include only the support code?

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2 Answers 2

You can do this with the Maven Jar Plugin

Maven Jar Plugin

Since you're using Maven you can just cut a separate artifact of the project that contains the libraries you want to use in foo add the following plugin to create another jar artifact:

  <plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-jar-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>2.3.2</version>
    <executions>
       <execution>
          <goals>
              <goal>test-jar</goal>
          </goals>
       </execution>
    </executions>
  </plugin>

This creates a second jar in this project of everything in the src/test directory.

Test Jars

You could splice out the stuff in that jar you don't need with some filters.

Then to use this library you would include this as a dependancy in foo:

 <dependency>
    <groupId>your.group</groupId>
    <artifactId>parent-artifact-id</artifactId>
    <version>1.0.0</version>
    <type>test-jar</type>
    <scope>test</scope>
 </dependency>

To separate the projects further you can also create a test only project with your more frameworky test jars.
See How to create a jar containing test classes (Preferred way) in the Maven Jar Plugin doc

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Is it possible to create a normal tests jar (with all code from src/test) and another one with a filtered set of files? –  Aaron Digulla Dec 21 '12 at 15:29
    
Should be able to do that by running the plugin twice with different classifiers maven.apache.org/plugins/maven-jar-plugin/usage.html –  Bob Paulin Dec 21 '12 at 15:34
    
Doesn't work :-( The goal test-jar ignores the value in classifier and always uses tests. It works as expected with goal jar but then, it only looks for classes in src/main, so the JAR is always empty. –  Aaron Digulla Dec 21 '12 at 16:49
    
So looking further down the doc I sent you it appears that they recommend creating a separate project for the tests if you want to further separate it: The preferred way In order to let Maven resolve all test-scoped transitive dependencies you should create a separate project. –  Bob Paulin Dec 21 '12 at 17:38
    
Yes but then, I would have three projects in my work space :-/ I'd prefer to have less projects rather than more :-) –  Aaron Digulla Dec 21 '12 at 17:54
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is a POM fragment which splits the main JAR into the normal artifact and a "JUnit support JAR":

<build>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <artifactId>maven-jar-plugin</artifactId>
            <executions>
                <execution>
                    <id>default-jar</id>
                    <phase>package</phase>
                    <goals>
                        <goal>jar</goal>
                    </goals>
                    <configuration>
                        <archive>
                            <index>true</index>
                            <manifest>
                                <addDefaultImplementationEntries>true</addDefaultImplementationEntries>
                            </manifest>
                        </archive>
                        <excludes>
                            <exclude>**/junit/**</exclude>
                        </excludes>
                    </configuration>
                </execution>

                <execution>
                    <id>junit-jar</id>
                    <phase>package</phase>
                    <goals>
                        <goal>jar</goal>
                    </goals>
                    <configuration>
                        <classifier>junit</classifier>
                        <archive>
                            <index>true</index>
                            <manifest>
                                <addDefaultImplementationEntries>true</addDefaultImplementationEntries>
                            </manifest>
                        </archive>
                        <includes>
                            <include>**/junit/**</include>
                        </includes>
                    </configuration>
                </execution>

                <execution>
                    <id>test-jar</id>
                    <goals>
                        <goal>test-jar</goal>
                    </goals>
                </execution>
            </executions>
        </plugin>

    </plugins>
</build>

In a nutshell, it looks for any package with junit in its name and puts it into the JUnit JAR, excluding it from the normal artifact.

If the coordinate for the normal jar is

<groupId>com.group</groupId>
<artifactId>foo</artifactId>

then you can get the JUnit support code by simply adding <classifier>junit</classifier>:

<groupId>com.group</groupId>
<artifactId>foo</artifactId>
<classifier>junit</classifier>

So to use this, the POM which depends on com.group:foo will look like this:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.group</groupId>
    <artifactId>foo</artifactId>
    <version>...</version>
</dependency>
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.group</groupId>
    <artifactId>foo</artifactId>
    <version>...</version>
    <classifier>junit</classifier>
    <scope>test</scope>
</dependency>

Sometimes, you will need JUnit to compile your "JUnit support JAR". If that's the case, use

<dependency>
    <groupId>junit</groupId>
    <artifactId>junit</artifactId>
    <scope>compile</scope>
    <optional>true</optional>
</dependency>

to include JUnit into the build. This will make the dependency available at compile time but it will not leak to anyone else.

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You could just bind the 2 separate jar plugin tasks to different phases. So, when you run mvn.bat test install then the test phase can make the first jar and the install phase can create the second one right? Just an idea to add. –  djangofan Mar 31 at 15:15
    
@djangofan: I guess I could do that but what would be the advantage? –  Aaron Digulla Mar 31 at 16:07

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