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Programe #1

// file.h
class File
{
public:
    static const int var = 9;
};

-

// main.cpp
#include <iostream>
#include "file.h"
using namespace std;

int main() {
    File f;
    cout << f.var;
    return 0;
}

Programe #2

// file.h
int GlobalVar ;
class File
{
public:
    static const int var = 9;
};

-

// main.cpp
extern int GlobalVar;

#include <iostream>
#include "file.h"
using namespace std;

int main() {
    cout << GlobalVar;
    return 0 ;
}

Program#1 is running fine, but program#2 gives linker error:

error LNK2005: "int GlobalVar" (?x@@3HA) already defined in file.obj

I know the header files are never compiled. Then in the above case, how the compiler knows the definition of variable var, but not able to find the definition of GlobalVar? What is the difference between this two programs?

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closed as too localized by jogojapan, Flavius, Mario, Maerlyn, Praveen Kumar Dec 23 '12 at 14:34

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What do you mean by "program#2 is not running fine"? –  Kiril Kirov Dec 21 '12 at 14:26
    
program#2 gives the linker error . –  vivek Dec 21 '12 at 14:32
    
Please, provide the exact error message. –  Kiril Kirov Dec 21 '12 at 14:33
    
error LNK2005: "int GlobalVar" (?x@@3HA) already defined in file.obj –  vivek Dec 21 '12 at 14:35
    
This is different thing, but see my edit. –  Kiril Kirov Dec 21 '12 at 14:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

When you use

#include "some_header.h"

or

#include <some_header.h>

these include directives are directly* replaced by the pre-processor with the content of some_header.h.

So, when you compile the cpp file, it actually includes the content of some_header.h. That's how this code is compiled.

* - if you have include guards, the content my be skipped, if it's already included by some other header


EDIT: Regarding your edit - about extern: this is not the correct way to do it.

extern int GlobalVar ;

should be placed in the header, and

int Globalvar ;

should be in the cpp file. You should read a little more about extern to understand how it works and what does it do (hint: suppose you want to have only one variable, defined at one place and reachable in multiple cpp files - how would you do it? There are plenty of questions in SO, too, about this case).

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I know this is not the correct way to do . But to get clarification on my doubts i have posted the above code (program#2). How far i know we have to define it in cpp files since to allocate the memory for it during compilation . since .h file never compiles we have to give definition for it inside cpp file . But this is not the case for program#1 . That is where i am getting doubt like for programe#1 also we have initialized static variable inside .h file , hence it allocated some memory .As a result the programe#1 works fine . Then why dont it works in case of programe#2 ? –  vivek Dec 21 '12 at 14:55
    
@viku - I think you need to read my answer again and more carefully. Both cases are absolutely identical - the only difference is the wrong usage of extern. You're right, that the headers are not compiled, BUT the code inside them IS compiled - as it replaces the include directives. You can test this by your own: 1. Cut the code from file.h from your second example; 2. Replace include "file.h" with the code from 1.; 3. Compile ONLY the file.cpp - you'll get the same error. Again - reason: wrong usage of extern. Nothing to do with header/cpp files. –  Kiril Kirov Dec 21 '12 at 17:59
    
@viku - actually, maybe you're missing something here by mistake - GlobalVar is never defined! What you have in your header is Globalvar (note the capital V in the cpp file) –  Kiril Kirov Dec 21 '12 at 18:03

There is a certain allowance for static const data members which is similar to the allowance for inline functions (functions defined in the header file either within a class declaration or marked as inline). For static const data members of primitive types (e.g., integers), it is allowed to define them in the header file even if that would technically lead to One Definition Rule (ODR) violations, because for such primitive types and under the assumption that all instances of those data members seen by the linker came from the same header file, it is safe to assume that they will all be equal. And because they are constant, there is no problem in having many copies (or optimizing them away entirely), but if non-const, then there must be a guarantee of a single instance being manipulated. And because they are of primitive types (with trivial constructors), there are no issues of side-effects from the multiple construction of the static data member (in multiple translation units), but if non-primitive, then there must be a guarantee that the construction happens only once during the static initialization. So, obviously, this exceptional rule doesn't apply to static data members that are non-const and/or non-primitive (class type), in which case, they must be defined in one translation unit only (one compiled cpp file).

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