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I'm building a site under PHP and it shows up well in Chrome, Firefox, IE7,8,9. The problem is when I analyse the source code in IE9 (with IE9 standards) it is full of empty text nodes(every element has an empty node text right after closing). Is it because I'm using PHP includes? For instance index.php include the header.php and footer.php... The files encoding is UTF-8 No Mark but I tried different ones...

Empty text Nodes

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Please post code sample and provide additional information. We can't help you without looking at the code. –  Kush Dec 21 '12 at 14:28
    
Have you had a look at this? stackoverflow.com/questions/1379380/… –  Kent Pawar Dec 21 '12 at 14:29
    
If you check any other code, don't you see these empty text nodes too? ) –  raina77ow Dec 21 '12 at 14:29
    
Have you validated your HTML? It's a small thing, but it goes a long way in resolving issues like this. –  Nick Tomlin Dec 21 '12 at 14:31
    
Hello Kent. This happens with every element (even <head> ones ) –  Diogo Mendonça Dec 21 '12 at 14:32

1 Answer 1

Text nodes between elements are not empty. They just contain whitespace (typically space, line feed, and tab characters). It's perfectly fine.

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But there's something wrong with my code? It only happens in IE9 standards –  Diogo Mendonça Dec 21 '12 at 14:45
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Actually, it happens in all browsers as per spec: "The space characters are always allowed between elements. User agents represent these characters between elements in the source markup as text nodes in the DOM." There is nothing problematic with this. –  Marat Tanalin Dec 21 '12 at 14:48
    
You're likely noticing it as F12 (IE debugger) looks like it shows the DOM as a tree (which is more correct but not as user friendly sometimes). You will likely see the same if you open Opera Dragonfly in Opera and switch to view the DOM as a tree. Do this by right clicking on the DOM view and selecting the first option from the context menu. –  David Storey Dec 22 '12 at 2:57

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