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Ok, I've tried my best at searching, but. I've got a task, where I need to load some js using the Ajax and so on. Long story short, I've stuck.

First a code in script.js (which I must load AND which I can't modify):

var divs = [
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 0</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 1</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 2</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 3</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 4</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 5</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 6</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 7</div>'
];
delete(divs[3]);

Then my script to load it

$.getScript('script.js', function() {
    $('.a').append('<div class="yep">' + divs.join('') + '</div>');
    $('.item').each(function() {
        $(this).click(function() {
            console.log( $('.item').index(this) );
        });
    });     
});

The problem is that on click I need to get index of item in array, i.e. if I click on "Lorem ipsum 4" console should print "4", not "3" as it happens now (because of deleted element which doesn't appear in dom). Is there a way to get the right result using jQuery?

Ok, I need to say that it's a task. And here is the thing: I simply CAN'T modify script.js. Let's say it's on server and I have no access to it until I get it. But I need index of an element which it has in the original array.

share|improve this question
    
One potential solution would be to store the index with the div element in a data attribute, like so: <div class="item" data-index="3">Lorem Ipsum 3</div> –  cale_b Dec 21 '12 at 14:39
    
Yea, you would need an alternative solution. Because the div was deleted before you ran a .each(); that element and its index is gone. You would have to save it another way like with a data-attribute as mentioned above. –  Syon Dec 21 '12 at 14:41
    
I can't modify the script.js file and I don't need to remove items from array. I need to get the right index only –  Alexey Kibin Dec 21 '12 at 14:43
    
@Blazemonger and he's calling it as a function, i'll assume that's psuedocode and delete my previous comment :P –  jbabey Dec 21 '12 at 14:47
    
@jbabey That's unimportant. Doesn't it just set the index's value to undefined and not remove it from the array? Therefore it won't be inserted into the DOM. Anyways, they said they cannot modify that part anyways... –  Ian Dec 21 '12 at 14:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try something like this:

http://jsfiddle.net/YjNAL/1/

var divs = [
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 0</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 1</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 2</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 3</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 4</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 5</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 6</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 7</div>'
];
delete(divs[3]);

var yep = $('<div class="yep"></div>');    // Changed (from edit)

for (var i = 0; i < divs.length; i++) {
    if (divs[i]) {  // Don't operate on undefined items
        var theDiv = $(divs[i]).data("idx", i);    // Changed (from edit)

        yep.append(theDiv);    // Changed (from edit)
    }
}

$(".a").append(yep);    // Changed (from edit)

$('.item').on("click", function() {
    console.log( $(this).data("idx") );
});

Notice how the original array isn't modified.

Each item in the array is modified and creates a jQuery object before it is appended. <- I'm sure that part could be done more efficiently, I was just trying to throw something together.

It stores its index in the array from of the for loop, so that should be accurate.

Any undefined (deleted) items are ignored.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, +1 for ingenuity. I hope that's what the OP's real code is doing, though. –  Blazemonger Dec 21 '12 at 15:21
1  
@Blazemonger Thanks :) It's the only way I could think of not touching the first block of code in the OP yet still preserve the index without any unreliable hack. There's still alterations that could be made. And true, who knows what's actually being used...it could be much tougher to do –  Ian Dec 21 '12 at 15:23
    
It's just what I need, thanks! –  Alexey Kibin Dec 21 '12 at 15:25
1  
@AlexeyKibin No problem! I actually went back through and changed a few things (put a comment on the lines I changed). I realized I did things weird/wrong (mainly actually including the .yep div at all), but hopefully it should work just the same but maybe better/correct –  Ian Dec 21 '12 at 15:44
1  
@AlexeyKibin Also, something to possibly optimize it would be instead of binding a click event to every .item div, is to bind it to the .yep divs and delegate it. Like $(".yep").on("click", ".item", function () { console.log($(this).data("idx")); }); –  Ian Dec 21 '12 at 15:47

You're asking for the INDEX of the clicked item. Your code is doing exactly what it's supposed to do. jQuery has no way to know if you've deleted items from the original list, it can only see what's currently there.

The best solution is to add an HTML attribute to the original items, and console.log that attribute instead of the .index. Like this:

var divs = [
    '<div data-idx="0" class="item">Lorem ipsum 0</div>',
    '<div data-idx="1" class="item">Lorem ipsum 1</div>',
    '<div data-idx="2" class="item">Lorem ipsum 2</div>',
    '<div data-idx="3" class="item">Lorem ipsum 3</div>',
    '<div data-idx="4" class="item">Lorem ipsum 4</div>',
    '<div data-idx="5" class="item">Lorem ipsum 5</div>',
    '<div data-idx="6" class="item">Lorem ipsum 6</div>',
    '<div data-idx="7" class="item">Lorem ipsum 7</div>'
    ];
delete(divs[3]);


$('.a').append('<div class="yep">' + divs.join('') + '</div>');

$('.item').each(function() {
    $(this).click(function() {
        console.log($(this).data('idx'));
    });
});​

http://jsfiddle.net/mblase75/8NLGm/

share|improve this answer
    
I can't modify divs array –  Alexey Kibin Dec 21 '12 at 14:55
    
There's no way for YOUR code to know what's been deleted from the array before you have access to it. You need SOMETHING to go on. We could parse the .text() of your divs to extract the number, but I doubt that's the content you're really using. –  Blazemonger Dec 21 '12 at 15:13

You can try this. Give all the divs an ID, and get that:

var divs = [
    '<div class="item" id="0">Lorem ipsum 0</div>',
    '<div class="item" id="1">Lorem ipsum 1</div>',
    '<div class="item" id="2">Lorem ipsum 2</div>',
    '<div class="item" id="3">Lorem ipsum 3</div>',
    '<div class="item" id="4">Lorem ipsum 4</div>',
    '<div class="item" id="5">Lorem ipsum 5</div>',
    '<div class="item" id="6">Lorem ipsum 6</div>',
    '<div class="item" id="7">Lorem ipsum 7</div>'
];
delete(divs[3]);

$('.a').append('<div class="yep">' + divs.join('') + '</div>');
$('.item').each(function() {
    $(this).click(function() {
        console.log(this.id);
    });
});  ​

Numbers in id's?!?

Yea, I know, in HTML4 ids starting with numbers weren't allowed. HTML5, however, removed this restriction.
Those divs will validate according to the w3 validator.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it worked! Can you please explain your solution? –  Alexey Kibin Dec 21 '12 at 14:46
3  
Nitpick: IDs that start with numbers are invalid HTML 4, although they usually work in browsers anyway. –  Blazemonger Dec 21 '12 at 14:47
3  
@AlexeyKibin The proper way to store arbitrary data is with the data-* attributes like Blazemonger's answer...please use that solution. –  Ian Dec 21 '12 at 14:51
1  
Hm. You've changed it. Previous: console.log($(this).text()[$(this).text().length-1]); Worked for me. And I couldn't accept it because of site restrictions –  Alexey Kibin Dec 21 '12 at 14:52
1  
It's not an identifier in any way that it's meant to be. Does it identify it within the DOM? Then no, it's not an identifier. id is the last place you should look to use for this kind of thing –  Ian Dec 21 '12 at 15:00

If you would rather have it a bit dynamic, you could create an element, add a data field to it, then access that element:

var divs = [
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 0</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 1</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 2</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 3</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 4</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 5</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 6</div>',
    '<div class="item">Lorem ipsum 7</div>'
    ];
var newdivs = $('<div class="yep">').append(divs.join(""));
newdivs.find('.item').each(function() {
     $(this).data("myindex", $(this).index());
});
var elementToDelete = 3
delete(divs[elementToDelete]);
newdivs.find('.item').eq(elementToDelete).remove();
$('.a').append(newdivs);

$('.a').on('click','.item',function() {
    $(this).css("background-color","lime");
    alert($(this).data("myindex"));
});

see how it works here: http://jsfiddle.net/rZjNd/2/

share|improve this answer
    
That fiddle's alerting undefined for me. (Google Chrome) –  Cerbrus Dec 21 '12 at 15:01
    
Fixed it, was a syntax issue on a refactor of mine :) –  Mark Schultheiss Dec 21 '12 at 15:06
    
In this solution I need to change original script, which I can't do –  Alexey Kibin Dec 21 '12 at 15:16

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