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I have scheduled a batch file on a Windows XP machine to copy a number of text files from a Network Share. The next time this task runs the files are simply overwritten. Batch file goes something like this

copy \\networkshare1\*.txt C:\monitoring\files\
copy \\networkshare2\*.txt C:\monitoring\files\

I then use Perl to analyse the files. What I would like to know is if there is an easy way, without changing the file name, of recording somewhere what time the file was copied from the network share so that my Perl script knows whether it is working with an old or new version of the file.

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old/new implies a comparison, so you'll have to record the previous state/timestamp/checksum/whatever to determine that... –  pavel Dec 21 '12 at 14:44

3 Answers 3

One way, assuming destination is NTFS:

set dest=C:\monitoring\files\
for %%f in ("\\networkshare1\*.txt") do (
    copy "%%f" "%dest%"
    echo %TIME% >"%dest%%%~nxf:copywhen"
)

This copies each manually and appends the time to the data stream copywhen, which is permanently associated with the file when its in situ on an NTFS volume.

I'm pretty sure Perl's standard file routines will allow reading this back by simply passing the path as C:\monitoring\files\whatever.txt:copywhen, if not you can capture the output from the command line more <"C:\monitoring\files\whatever.txt:copywhen".

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Take a look at the File::stat package. This replaces the internal Perl stat command with a by name interface. However, you could use either the builtin stat command, or the File::stat package.

use File::stat;
use feature qw(say);

my $file_stat = stat($file_name);
say "The following times are displayed as seconds since January 1, 1970"
say "    File Last Access time: " . $file_stat->atime;
say "    File Last Modification time: " . $file_stat->mtime;
say "    File inode Change Time: " . $file_stat->ctime;

One of these should do it. I think your best bet might be mtime.

If you don't want to use File::Stat use the builtin stat command:

say "The following times are displayed as seconds since January 1, 1970"
say "    File Last Access time: " . (stat $my_file)[8]
say "    File Last Modification time: " . (stat $my_file)[9];
say "    File inode Change Time: " . (stat $my_file)[10];

To convert the time into something human readable, use the Time::Piece module.

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A simple way is to just delete the file right before you copy it. Since it's being copied from another drive, the time/date stamp should be when it was copied to the drive. That's the way windows has always worked for me. ^_^

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