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How do i find a string in a file? In my code, i want to find the name of a person in the file. and do the actions in the comments. Here is my code:

int main(){
size_t found;
ofstream myfile;
cout << "Enter the name you wish to delete." << endl;
getline(cin, name);
myfile.open("database.dat");
found=myfile.find(name);
if (found!=string::npos){
    number = myfile.tellg();
    /*Delete current line and next line*/
}
}
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2  
Maybe I'm missing something here but isn't ofstream for writing files, not reading them? –  WildCrustacean Dec 21 '12 at 14:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Do you want to modify the file, or simply skip those two lines while reading?

Actually, the solution is the same for both, because removing data from the middle of the file requires reading everything after that and rewriting it with an offset (just like removing an element from the middle of an array).

So, read the entire file into memory except for any lines you determine need to be deleted (just skip those). After that, write the surviving lines back to disk. It's probably a good idea to use a temporary file which gets moved to the original name as a final step, so that data isn't destroyed if your process is aborted.

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But if the file is going to have thousands of lines? would it still be a good method? –  Deckdyl Dec 21 '12 at 15:01
2  
@Deckdyl files can't have "holes" in them, so there isn't much choice. –  Roddy Dec 21 '12 at 15:05
    
How do i skip reading the lines? –  Deckdyl Dec 22 '12 at 9:01
1  
@Deckdyl: You don't skip reading them so much as you skip adding them to your in-memory data structure which gets written back out to disk. –  Ben Voigt Dec 22 '12 at 16:17
    
Thx, i got it sorted out now. –  Deckdyl Dec 24 '12 at 5:27

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