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I'm getting different values for i by calling add function differently. Could someone explain what's happening here?

var i = 0;
var add = function() {
    ++i;
    return function() {
        i++;
        return function() {
            i++;
            add();
        }
    }
 };
add(); // i = 1;
add()(); // i = 2;        
add()()(); // i = 4;

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closed as too localized by Cerbrus, Ja͢ck, apsillers, AlphaMale, cHao Dec 21 '12 at 15:51

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1  
Could you explain what you're trying to do? –  Ja͢ck Dec 21 '12 at 14:54
    
It's a trick question –  JS-coder Dec 21 '12 at 15:04
    
In my test, add() returns function () { i++; return function() { i++; add(); } } instead of 1. –  coderLMN Dec 21 '12 at 15:07
    
@JinzhaoWu: It's not about the return values. It's about the value of i afterwards. –  cHao Dec 21 '12 at 16:01
    
@cHao I got it. Thanks. –  coderLMN Dec 21 '12 at 16:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The function add returns a function. And this function returns another function.

So :

add(); // Executes add, which returns a function.
add()(); // Execute the function returned by add.
add()()(); // Execute the function returned by the function returned by add

Each function just adds 1 to the i value. That explains the i value.

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Thank you for quick response. Makes sense now. –  JS-coder Dec 21 '12 at 15:00

Your add function returns a function. So when you call this:

add();

what happens is the code (++i) executes and a function is returned. You don't do anything with that function, but you can. You can execute it:

add()();

This would run ++i, return a function, run that function (which runs i++) and return another function (since that inner function also returns a function.

And so on. Your functions are returning other functions, so any time you append another () to the call what you're doing is executing the function that's being returned.

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You are returning a function in add

By calling only

add()

The function is executed and i is increased by one // 1

When you call

add()()

The function that is returned by add gets executed too, and therefore increasing i by 2 // 2

add()()()

Invokes the funciton add returned, and the function the returned function returns, which also calls add in it, therefore increasing i by 4

But i thinl the code you are posted is slightly incorrect, the values should be

add() //i = 1
add()() // i = 3
add()()() //i = 7
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Only the two-arg version seems to do an extra increment (by calling add()). So at first glance, 1, 2, 4 looks like the right return values. Why would they be otherwise? ("Your code is incorrect, but it's returning the values you expect" isn't selling me here.) –  cHao Dec 21 '12 at 15:54
    
i doesn't get resetted after the add is called -> i = 0 , + 1 = 1, +2 = 3, + 4 = 7; I didn't actually test it, but I don't see an i = 0 anywhere after the first call or in a function in the code –  C5H8NNaO4 Dec 21 '12 at 16:08
    
Oooo. Good catch. –  cHao Dec 21 '12 at 16:16

Inside add() a new function is returned.

So calling add()() will execute add() first. After that the function returned by add() will be executed

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In javascript "()" is function invocation operator. So every time you call "()", it will try to invoke the function before this operator. In your case, a function is assigned to add. Let me assign each function a name so it will be very easy to understand.

var i = 0;
var add = function one() {
++i;
return function two() {
    i++;
    return function three() {
            i++;
            add();
        }
    }
};

// This will execute function one 
// and return function two.
add();   

// This will execute function one and two, 
// return function three
add()(); 

// This will execute function one, two, three,
// return function two. Why?
// Because in function three, we call add() which will execute
// function one and return function two as I mentioned above.
add()()();

Now let's see if you really understand function invocation.

var i = 0;
var add = function one() {
i++;
return function two() {
    i++;
    return function three() {
            i++;
        }
    }()
};

I delete the function add() inside function three in order to avoid infinity loop, and add "()" after function two. So what if we call add() now?

// This will execute function one and return function two, 
// function two will invoke itself because of "()" at the end 
// I added and return function three. So call add() will 
// execute function one and function two, return function three.
// So i = 2 in this case.
add();

You can play around these function invocation all day long until you are confident with it.

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