Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a maven2 multi-module project and in each of my child modules I have JUnit tests that are named Test.java and Integration.java for unit tests and integration tests respectively. When I execute:

mvn test

all of the JUnit tests *Test.java within the child modules are executed. When I execute

mvn test -Dtest=**/*Integration

none of the Integration.java tests get execute within the child modules.

These seem like the exact same command to me but the one with the -Dtest=/Integration* does not work it displays 0 tests being run at the parent level, which there are not any tests

share|improve this question
add comment

8 Answers 8

up vote 25 down vote accepted

You can set up Maven's Surefire to run unit tests and integration tests separately. In the standard unit test phase you run everything that does not pattern match an integration test. You then create a second test phase that runs just the integration tests.

Here is an example:

    <plugin>
      <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
      <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
      <configuration>
        <excludes>
          <exclude>**/*IntegrationTest.java</exclude>
        </excludes>
      </configuration>
      <executions>
        <execution>
          <id>integration-test</id>
          <goals>
            <goal>test</goal>
          </goals>
          <phase>integration-test</phase>
          <configuration>
            <excludes>
              <exclude>none</exclude>
            </excludes>
            <includes>
              <include>**/*IntegrationTest.java</include>
            </includes>
          </configuration>
        </execution>
      </executions>
    </plugin>
share|improve this answer
    
I configured this as you said and only the *Test not the *Integration.java files will run when executing: mvn install I need to run my *Test.java as the default, but for my nightlty build I need to run both *Test.java and *Integration.java. I have to execute mvn install then cd to each sub-child directory and execute mvn -Dtest=**/*Integration test –  Peter Delaney Sep 9 '09 at 16:05
    
Won't work -- see my answer. –  HDave Jul 9 '10 at 3:00
6  
You should use the Fail-safe plugin for integration testing, not the sure-fire plugin. It won't fail the build until after the post-integration phase is complete; allowing you to tear down test resources (a web server, for example) before the build is failed. Hence, fail-safe. –  John Gordon Mar 19 '12 at 19:12
    
for me, as part of pre-integration phase, jetty server starts. Last log line is : [INFO] Started Jetty Server. After that, nothing happens. It gets stuck. maven surefire failsafe plugin doesn't execute tests nor jetty server stops. Any idea what's wrong? I am using same configuration as specified by you. –  Tarun Kumar Apr 26 '13 at 5:58
    
maven-failsafe-plugin has gone to Plugin Graveyard –  Jin Kwon Apr 14 at 6:31
add comment

The Maven build lifecycle now includes the "integration-test" phase for running integration tests, which are run separately from the unit tests run during the "test" phase. It runs after "package", so if you run "mvn verify", "mvn install", or "mvn deploy", integration tests will be run along the way.

By default, integration-test runs test classes named **/IT*.java, **/*IT.java, and **/*ITCase.java, but this can be configured.

For details on how to wire this all up, see the Failsafe plugin, the Failsafe usage page (not correctly linked from the previous page as I write this), and also check out this Sonatype blog post.

share|improve this answer
6  
+1 I think this is the most 'Maven-y' way to do it. –  Joshua Davis Jun 16 '11 at 11:01
    
maven-failsafe-plugin has gone to Plugin Graveyard –  Jin Kwon Apr 14 at 6:35
2  
@JinKwon only the codehaus mojo went to the graveyard. Failsafe is still being maintained. –  Will V May 29 at 7:39
    
@WillV Correct. The Codehaus' graveyard. And the maven-failsafe-plugin is in Apache now. Sorry. :) –  Jin Kwon May 29 at 9:15
    
By default mvn integration-test also runs unit tests (using via surefire) but mvn failsafe:integration-test runs only the failsafe integration tests. –  Shadow Creeper Jun 5 at 19:07
add comment

I have done EXACTLY what you want to do and it works great. Unit tests "*Tests" always run, and "*IntegrationTests" only run when you do a mvn verify or mvn install. Here it the snippet from my POM. serg10 almost had it right....but not quite.

  <plugin>
    <!-- Separates the unit tests from the integration tests. -->
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
    <configuration>
       <!-- Skip the default running of this plug-in (or everything is run twice...see below) -->
       <skip>true</skip>
       <!-- Show 100% of the lines from the stack trace (doesn't work) -->
       <trimStackTrace>false</trimStackTrace>
    </configuration>
    <executions>
       <execution>
          <id>unit-tests</id>
          <phase>test</phase>
          <goals>
             <goal>test</goal>
          </goals>
          <configuration>
                <!-- Never skip running the tests when the test phase is invoked -->
                <skip>false</skip>
             <includes>
                   <!-- Include unit tests within integration-test phase. -->
                <include>**/*Tests.java</include>
             </includes>
             <excludes>
               <!-- Exclude integration tests within (unit) test phase. -->
                <exclude>**/*IntegrationTests.java</exclude>
            </excludes>
          </configuration>
       </execution>
       <execution>
          <id>integration-tests</id>
          <phase>integration-test</phase>
          <goals>
             <goal>test</goal>
          </goals>
          <configuration>
            <!-- Never skip running the tests when the integration-test phase is invoked -->
             <skip>false</skip>
             <includes>
               <!-- Include integration tests within integration-test phase. -->
               <include>**/*IntegrationTests.java</include>
             </includes>
          </configuration>
       </execution>
    </executions>
  </plugin>

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what I tried to do, but my integration tests kept running during mvn test phase, as I did NOT SKIP THE DEFAULT. I thought configuring the test execution would override it. As you explained, it just adds a new execution (thus everything would run twice). So for me the skip was missing piece. +1 As this configuration answers the question to 100% –  Nils Schmidt Dec 10 '10 at 1:39
2  
Then feel free to check the box for this response being the answer! –  HDave Dec 6 '11 at 6:16
1  
This is a slightly more refined version dzone.com/snippets/set-maven-run-unit-tests-and –  cletus Aug 10 '12 at 18:10
    
for me, as part of pre-integration phase, jetty server starts. Last log line is : [INFO] Started Jetty Server. After that, nothing happens. It gets stuck. maven surefire failsafe plugin doesn't execute tests nor jetty server stops. Any idea what's wrong? I am using same configuration as specified by you. –  Tarun Kumar Apr 26 '13 at 5:58
    
@Tarun - ask a new question re your issue –  HDave Apr 26 '13 at 13:00
add comment

You should try using maven failsafe plugin. You can tell it to include a certain set of tests.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 This is what I use. Works well, and allows you to do pre/post setup, such as starting and shutting down a local servlet container. –  mdma Apr 13 '11 at 17:51
    
maven-failsafe-plugin has gone to Plugin Graveyard –  Jin Kwon Apr 14 at 6:32
1  
The graveyard page just says the failsafe plugin has been moved to maven-failsafe-plugin. It looks like the maven-failsafe-plugin is still active (docs were last pushed March 2014). –  James Kingsbery Apr 14 at 13:52
add comment

You can split them very easily using JUnit categories and Maven.
This is shown very, very briefly below by splitting unit and integration tests.

Define A Marker Interface

The first step in grouping a test using categories is to create a marker interface.
This interface will be used to mark all of the tests that you want to be run as integration tests.

public interface IntegrationTest {}

Mark your test classes

Add the category annotation to the top of your test class. It takes the name of your new interface.

import org.junit.experimental.categories.Category;<br>
@Category(IntegrationTest.class)
public class ExampleIntegrationTest{
@Test
public void longRunningServiceTest() throws Exception {
 }
}

Configure Maven Unit Tests

The beauty of this solution is that nothing really changes for the unit test side of things.
We simply add some configuration to the maven surefire plugin to make it to ignore any integration tests.

<plugin>
<groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
<artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
<version>2.11</version>
<dependencies>
 <dependency>
  <groupId>org.apache.maven.surefire</groupId>
  <artifactId>surefire-junit47</artifactId>
  <version>2.12</version>
 </dependency>
</dependencies>
<configuration>
 <includes>
  <include>**/*.class</include>
 </includes>
 <excludedGroups>com.test.annotation.type.IntegrationTest</excludedGroups>
</configuration>
</plugin>
</pre>

When you do a mvn clean test only your unmarked unit tests will run.

Configure Maven Integration Tests

Again the configuration for this is very simple.
We use the standard failsafe plugin and configure it to only run the integration tests.

<plugin>
<groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
<artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
<version>2.11</version>
<dependencies>
 <dependency>
  <groupId>org.apache.maven.surefire</groupId>
  <artifactId>surefire-junit47</artifactId>
  <version>2.12</version>
 </dependency>
</dependencies>
<configuration>
 <includes>
  <include>**/*.class</include>
 </includes>
 <excludedGroups>com.test.annotation.type.IntegrationTest</excludedGroups>
</configuration>
</plugin>

The configuration uses a standard execution goal to run the failsafe plugin during the integration-test phase of the build.

You can now do a mvn clean install
This time as well as the unit tests running, the integration tests are run during the integration-test phase.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought JUnit has no more secrets to me. Good spot! –  gertas Mar 28 '13 at 7:12
    
This only works if the marker interface already exists somewhere available to Maven. It does not work if your marker interface exists in another module of the same multi-module build. –  Deejay Jul 24 '13 at 10:47
add comment

By default, Maven only runs tests that have Test somewhere in the class name.

Rename to IntegrationTest and it'll probably work.

Alternatively you can change the Maven config to include that file but it's probably easier and better just to name your tests SomethingTest.

From Inclusions and Exclusions of Tests:

By default, the Surefire Plugin will automatically include all test classes with the following wildcard patterns:

  • "**/Test*.java" - includes all of its subdirectory and all java filenames that start with "Test".
  • "**/*Test.java" - includes all of its subdirectory and all java filenames that end with "Test".
  • "**/*TestCase.java" - includes all of its subdirectory and all java filenames that end with "TestCase".

If the test classes does not go with the naming convention, then configure Surefire Plugin and specify the tests you want to include.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi and thanks I have two kinds of tests normal POJO Junit tests called SomethingTest.java which get fired. I also have integration tests called SomethingIntegration.java which do not get fired. The SomethingTest.java get fired via mvn test or mvn install. The second tests do not get fired. mvn test -Dtest=**/*Integration –  Peter Delaney Sep 9 '09 at 14:08
    
.. and by "Maven only runs tests that have Test somewhere in the class name" you mean "the Maven surefire plugin only runs tests that have Test somewhere in the class name". –  Joshua Davis Jun 16 '11 at 11:00
    
Its not "somewhere in the classname" its "the class name ends with Test", for example MyTest works but MyTests doesn't –  Julian May 19 '12 at 4:33
add comment

Another way of running integration tests with Maven is to make use of the profile feature:

...
<build>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
            <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
            <configuration>
                <includes>
                    <include>**/*Test.java</include>
                </includes>
                <excludes>
                    <exclude>**/*IntegrationTest.java</exclude>
                </excludes>
            </configuration>
        </plugin>
    </plugins>
</build>

<profiles>
    <profile>
        <id>integration-tests</id>
        <build>
            <plugins>
                <plugin>
                    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                    <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
                    <configuration>
                        <includes>
                            <include>**/*IntegrationTest.java</include>
                        </includes>
                        <excludes>
                            <exclude>**/*StagingIntegrationTest.java</exclude>
                        </excludes>
                    </configuration>
                </plugin>
            </plugins>
        </build>
    </profile>
</profiles>
...

Running 'mvn clean install' will run the default build. As specified above integration tests will be ignored. Running 'mvn clean install -P integration-tests' will include the integration tests (I also ignore my staging integration tests). Furthermore, I have a CI server that runs my integration tests every night and for that I issue the command 'mvn test -P integration-tests'.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why wouldn't you use the integration-test phase? Profiles can then be used for things like integration-testing against various app servers, etc. like Arquillian does. I'm not a Maven expert, but I think the experts might say this is not very 'Maven-y'. –  Joshua Davis Jun 16 '11 at 10:58
    
@Joshua I guess I do it this way because my integration tests take at least 5 minutes to run and I issue 'mvn clean install' many times a day because I need to update my artifacts in my local maven repo. According to what people are saying above, running 'install' will cause the integration-test phase to run causing me to lose precious developer time. –  Jorge Jun 29 '11 at 20:06
    
Hmm... not sure about 'install' running integration-test. In any case I'd still use the phase instead of a profile. Profiles are better off used for things like supporting different app servers, etc. –  Joshua Davis Jul 12 '11 at 19:29
1  
I'll go ahead and play around with that then. Thanks for the advice! –  Jorge Jul 25 '11 at 16:32
    
@jorge I guess the correct goal to use here would be verify, right? –  Kilokahn Nov 15 '12 at 13:10
add comment

I think @Jorge is a good idea if we don't want to run integration-test phase.

In my case, I'm using this idea to run casperjs related test in the test phase.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.