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I am trying to include some CUDA code in a C project. To do this, I am compiling the CUDA source (.cu file) to a static library (.lib, I'm developing in Windows). I then wish to link in this static library to my C project. However, my linker is complaining about this step, and I believe it's because of a C/C++ linkage problem. The specific errors I am getting look something like this:

 Undefined symbol '_cudaMallocHost@8' referenced in "cufft object file.lib".

I am using CUDA 5.0 and I'm working in Visual Studio 10 to write and compile the CUDA source on a Windows 7 machine.

First, I have a .cu source file which compiles to a static library ("cufft object file.lib") just fine. I wrapped the whole thing in extern C { }. It looks something like this:

extern "C" {

#include <cuda.h>
#include <cufft.h>

int myCUDAfunction()
{
    //Some CUDA code
}

}

To go along with this, I made a header file with a list of functions define in the .cu source ("myCUDAheader.h") whose contents are just a series of function prototypes:

int myCUDAfunction();

etc

Finally in my C project I add the static library and include the header file.

Before I started declaring the functions in the CUDA source .cu file with extern "C", the linker complained about missing the symbols for those functions. They must be getting compiled correctly to C linkage now, but the actual CUDA functions (such as cudaMalloc) still seem to have C++ linkage. How do I get around this?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Have you included the CUDA headers and linked cudart.lib to your C application? If not you will probably need to do this as your static library will not include the actual CUDA library implementation. Also, I think the order in which you link them matters, I can't remember off the top my head if it's your library then cudart.lib or the other way around. If the worst comes to the worst you may have to set up your C project as a CUDA project.

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Static libraries on Windows seem like a hack to me for this reason. The static libraries don't actually contain their dependencies, forcing you to link the static library's dependencies into the main app. Better to use dynamic libraries and let Windows handle the linking at runtime. –  Roger Dahl Dec 21 '12 at 16:03
    
@RogerDahl I understand what you mean, the first time I encountered this I thought I had screwed up somewhere along the line. Alas, it was (and is) Windows that is screwed up! –  Chris McCabe Dec 21 '12 at 16:12
    
This was the problem, thanks! I needed to include cudart.lib in the final C project as well. –  phasedweasel Dec 21 '12 at 19:00
    
@phasedweasel Glad that helped :) if this is solved please accept the answer ;) –  Chris McCabe Dec 21 '12 at 19:01
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You can't change the linkage of the CUDA libraries, but you also don't need to. So this:

extern "C" {

#include <cuda.h>
#include <cufft.h>

int myCUDAfunction();

.....

}

is wrong, because you are declaring that the CUDA runtime library has C linkage, when it probably does not. This would be correct:

#include <cuda.h>
#include <cufft.h>

extern "C" {

int myCUDAfunction();
.....

}

That way myCUDAfunction has C linkage and will link when called from code compiled and linked with a C toolchain. The whole point of doing this is to provide C callable wrapper functions for your CUDA code and the library functions it calls. That way your C code can be completely ignorant of the C++ underpinnings of the CUDA code.

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