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It is said that IEnumerable is used in a custom collection. One of the uses is the foreach loop used to traverse through the custom collection.

However my question is that instead of making a custom collection that first implements IEnumerable and then constructing another class to implement IEnumerator to store a group of custom objects, why can't we just use list<your_customer_object>.

Thanks in advance for help.

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6  
"It is said" by who? –  Oded Dec 21 '12 at 15:21
    
That wouldn't be a custom collection. –  SLaks Dec 21 '12 at 15:21
1  
@phresnel - Ah, the same "they" from "they say..." –  Oded Dec 21 '12 at 15:22

9 Answers 9

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because you might want to implement a different data structure. IEnumerable abstracts the concept of sequence, while a List has the concept of index, adding/removing items and its own, data structure.

As an example of different structure, here's a class which allows you to enter an infinite foreach loop.

public class InfiniteSequence : IEnumerable<int>
{
    public IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return new InfiniteEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }

    class InfiniteEnumerator : IEnumerator<int>
    {
        public void Dispose()
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

        public bool MoveNext()
        {
            Current++;
            return true;
        }

        public void Reset()
        {
            Current = 0;
        }

        public int Current { get; private set; }

        object IEnumerator.Current
        {
            get { return Current; }
        }
    }
}
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Thanks for the detailed answer. –  Win Coder Dec 22 '12 at 9:42

Of course you can use List<T>.

If List<T> fits your needs, then use it and don't create a new class that inherits from IEnumerable<T>.

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You would provide your own implementation of IEnumerable<T> when List<T> isn't right for your needs. The canonical example of this is when you want to support lazy evaluation of your collection, perhaps with a method that uses yield return.

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As @ken2k said, you can just List<T> and you will got a generic version of List with your T type. But if you want to hide this implementation and customize some operations that List<T> or include new features, you can inherits from the List and implement your own methods. For sample:

public class CustomerCollection : List<Customer> // at this time, you have all methods from List such as Add, Remove, [index] etc...
{
   public double AverageAge()
   {
       return this.Average(customer => customer.Age)
   }

   // other methods...
}

IEnumeralbe is the most abstraction of collections in .Net Framework, you can just interate in this abstraction.

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You can just use List<T> or any other of the generic collection types. After all List<T> implements IEnumerable<T>.

Do you have a particular edge case that you need to cover with a bespoke collection?

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Of course you can define your members as List<T>, that however binds the customer of your class to a specific implementation. If you define the member as IEnumerable<T> (assuming that the consumers will only want to enumerate your collection) than you can change the implementation to a different collection type that implements the interface without breaking the contract. You if you change it from List<T> to SortedSet<T> to implement order your consumers are not affected.

It's basically the advantage of coding against interfaces rather than concrete types.

You can use a different interface, ie. ICollection<T> if your consumers want more than just enumerate.

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If it doesn't do anything else, go ahead. Specialized collections are for collections that need to do... special... things.

(For example, a ListViewItemCollection would have to notify its parent ListView when updated, so it needs to implement IList(T), and therefore IEnumerable(T). If you had a custom collection, it might inherit from that. Inheriting only from IEnumerable(T) makes sense only when your collection can be enumerated, but not indexed.)

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You Can.

public class List<T> : IList<T>, ICollection<T>, 
IList, ICollection, IReadOnlyList<T>, IReadOnlyCollection<T>, IEnumerable<T>, 
IEnumerable 
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I think the source of confusion here is the difference between a "custom collection" and a "collection of custom class instances". Of these two, your List<CustomObject> is the latter case - you are only reusing a collection created by someone else and taking advantage of generics to keep the item type info, that's all. Truly custom collection would probably implement IEnumerable<T>, but you will rarely (if ever) need it.

So in this case you not only can, but probably also should use List<CustomObject>

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