Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a List<object> which is a collection of various type of objects.

I am writing a helper method which will return a specific type of object. The helper method will accept type name as string parameter.

Note: I am using 3.5 framework.

share|improve this question
1  
Will the supplied type name match the actual type of each object, or do you want to convert the object into an instance of that type? –  C.Evenhuis Dec 21 '12 at 15:22
    
I think you want .OfType<T> - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/bb360913(v=vs.90).aspx or .Cast<T> –  Matt Dec 21 '12 at 15:22
    
Are you wanting the return value of the helper method to also be strongly typed, or is simply returning the proper type of object as an object acceptable? –  CodingGorilla Dec 21 '12 at 15:24

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you need to use a string as parameter you can't rely on OfType<T>() extension method. Fortunately it's easy to emulate:

public IEnumerable<object> OfType(this List<object> list, string typeName)
{
    return list.Where(x => x != null && x.GetType().Name == typeName);
}

As pointed out by @ChrisSinclair in the comment this solution does not manage conversions, casts and inheritance/interfaces. Casts (because of user defined conversion operators) and conversions (because of TypeConverters and the IConvertible interface) are little bit more tricky. For simple (implicit) casts (like with inheritance and interfaces) you can use this:

public IEnumerable<object> OfType(this List<object> list, string typeName)
{
    Type type = Type.GetType(typeName);
    return list.Where(x => x != null && type.IsAssignableFrom(x.GetType()));
}

How to perform conversions (even with CUSTOM CONVERSION OPERATORS) at run-time

I found I needed something like the code I posted in this answer but I had to extend it a little bit, here a better implementation that takes care of custom casts and conversions.

Put everything inside a CastExtensions class (or update code if you don't) then declare this small enum for its options:

[Flags]
public enum CastOptions
{
    None = 0,
    ExcludeNulls = 1,
    UseConversions = 2
}

The problem is that C# in general is a statically typed language, it means that almost everything (about types) must be known at compile time (then to perform a cast you have to know type your want to cast to at compile time). This function handles simple cases (like derivation) and more complex ones (interfaces, custom conversion operators - casts - and conversions - when required).

public static IEnumerable<object> OfType(this List<object> list, 
                                         string typeName, CastOptions options)
{
    Type type = Type.GetType(typeName);

    foreach (var obj in list)
    {
        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(obj, null))
        {
            if (options.HasFlag(CastOptions.ExcludeNulls))
                continue;

            yield return obj;
        }

        var objectType = obj.GetType();

        // Derived type?
        if (type.IsAssignableFrom(objectType))
            yield return obj;

        // Should we try to convert?
        if (!options.HasFlag(CastOptions.UseConversions))
            continue;

        // Castable?
        object convertedValue = null;

        try
        {
            var method = typeof(CastExtensions)
                .GetMethod("Cast", BindingFlags.Static|BindingFlags.NonPublic)
                .MakeGenericMethod(type);

            convertedValue = method.Invoke(null, new object[] { obj });
        }
        catch (InvalidCastException)
        {
            // No implicit/explicit conversion operators
        }

        if (convertedValue != null)
            yield return convertedValue;

        // Convertible?
        if (options.HasFlag(CastOptions.UseConversions))
        {
            try
            {
                IConvertible convertible = obj as IConvertible;
                if (convertible != null)
                    convertible.ToType(type, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture);
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                // Exact exception depends on the source object type
            }
        }
    }
}

Note that conversion may be or not equivalent to a cast, actually it depends on the implementation and the exact types involved in the operation (that's why you can enable or disable this feature through options).

This is a small helper function needed for cast at run-time:

private static T Cast<T>(object obj)
{
    return (T)obj;
}

We may emit this code at run-time (I suppose even using expressions but I didn't try) but a small helper method will generate exactly the code we need (conversion from an object to a generic known at run-time type). Note that this cast function doesn't work as expected for value types, for example:

int a = 1;
float a = Cast<float>(a); // Run-time error

This is because (object)1 cannot be converted to anything else than int (this is true for all boxed value types). If you're using C# 4.0 you should change object for parameter obj to dynamic and everything will work as expected (for all types).

share|improve this answer
2  
Anil didn't specify, but this would not take into account inheritance/interfaces. If that's fine, all the better as otherwise it gets a bit more complicated/slow. Not knocking your solution (+1), just so Anil is aware. –  Chris Sinclair Dec 21 '12 at 15:33
1  
@ChrisSinclair you're right, it wasn't in the question so I didn't even think about it! –  Adriano Repetti Dec 21 '12 at 15:39

Maybe something like that :

var ofTypeTypeA = myList.OfType<TypeA>();
share|improve this answer
3  
-1 as string parameter –  bluish Dec 21 '12 at 15:27

A clean way is to force the user to specify the type as type to avoid loose strings in your application.

Then you could use generics and just use the type you are interested in. That would also allow the caller to skip the cast when using the IEnumerable later.

So instead of this:

List<object> newList = GetOfType(myList, "SomeObject");
// CAST!!
SomeObject someObject = newList[0] as SomeObject;
if (someObject != null)
    // use object

you would just do:

IEnumerable<SomeObject> newList = myList.OfType<SomeObject>();
foreach (SomeObject someObject in newList){
    // no cast neccessary

This makes it unsensitive in the future if you should rename the class SomeObject (because refactoring tools would pick up on the class name instead of the string)

share|improve this answer

You can use Enumerable.OfType

var input = new List<object>();
input.Add(1);
input.Add("foo");
var bar = input.OfType<string>();
share|improve this answer
3  
As with GeorgesD answer, this does not meet the OP's requirement of accepting the type name as a parameter. –  CodingGorilla Dec 21 '12 at 15:26
    
That was not in the original question. It was most likely edited after it was created. –  eandersson Dec 21 '12 at 15:28

I guess you need to cast a single object extracted from the list to a strongly-typed object. And not to cast all the list to it. Otherwise use List<MyType>.

So I would go with this: How to cast to a type in C#.

share|improve this answer

You could use the is operator (or pass the type and check for that also using is). Here is an example of using the is operator:

foreach (var ctl in ControlsList)
{
    if (ctl is CheckBox)
        //Do this
    else if (ctl is TextBox)
        //DoThis
}

And by passing the type as string in the parameter, you could do something similar to get the type to test against:

Type t = System.Type.GetType("System.Int32");
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.