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In test.txt:

rt : objective
tr350rt : objective
rtrt : objective
@username : objective
@user_1236 : objective
@254test!! : objective
@test : objective
#15 : objective

My codes:

import re
file3 = 'C://Users/Desktop/test.txt'
rfile3 = open(file3).read()
for altext in rfile3.split("\n"):
    saltext = altext.split("\t")
    for saltword in saltext:
        ssaltword = saltword.split(" ")
        if re.search(r'^rt$', ssaltword[0]):
        print ssaltword[0], ssaltword[2]
        testreplace = open(file3, 'w').write(rfile3.replace(ssaltword[0], ""))
        if re.search(r'^@\w', ssaltword[0]):
            print ssaltword[0], ssaltword[2]
        testreplace = open(file3, 'w').write(rfile3.replace(ssaltword[0], ""))

I got:

 : objective
tr350 : objective
 : objective
@username : objective
@user_1236 : objective
@254test!! : objective
 : objective
#15 : objective

I am trying to replace only "rt" and all @ with space

But from my codes all "rt" were replaced and only one @ was replaced.

I would like to get:

 : objective
tr350rt : objective
rtrt : objective
 : objective
 : objective
 : objective
 : objective
#15 : objective

Any suggestion?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think regex is overkill here:

with open("test.txt") as in_fp, open("test2.txt", "w") as out_fp:
    for line in in_fp:
        ls = line.split()
        if ls and (ls[0].startswith("@") or ls[0] == "rt"):
            line = line.replace(ls[0], "", 1)
        out_fp.write(line)

produces

localhost-2:coding $ cat test2.txt 
 : objective
tr350rt : objective
rtrt : objective
 : objective
 : objective
 : objective
 : objective
#15 : objective

Note that I've also changed it not to overwrite the original.

Edit: if you really want to overwrite the original in-place, then I'd read the whole thing into memory first:

with open("test.txt") as fp:
    lines = fp.readlines()

with open("test.txt", "w") as out_fp:
    for line in lines:
        ls = line.split()
        if ls and (ls[0].startswith("@") or ls[0] == "rt"):
            line = line.replace(ls[0], "", 1)
        out_fp.write(line)
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I am not familiar to use "with open". I have to overwrite that original file then I just use "in_fp.write(line)", right? –  ThanaDaray Dec 21 '12 at 16:05
1  
Please consider taking DSM's suggestion of not overwriting the original file; this is almost always preferable. Once you're certain your code is working, you can add a bit at the end to delete the original and rename the new one to match the old name. The with open syntax just means that Python opens that file but only keeps it open within the following scope (i.e. as long as the code is indented), then automatically closes it. –  Kyle Strand Dec 21 '12 at 16:07
    
@DSM Thank you so much. –  ThanaDaray Dec 21 '12 at 16:10
import re
with open("test.txt") as infile:
    text = infile.read()
    newtext = re.sub(r"(?m)^(?:rt\b|@\w+)(?=\s*:)", " ", text)

Explanation:

(?m)      # Turn on multiline mode
^         # Match start of line
(?:       # Either match...
 rt\b     # rt (as a complete word
|         # or
 @\w+     # @ followed by an alphanumeric "word"
)         # End of alternation
(?=\s*:)  # Assert that a colon follows (after optional whitespace)
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this and nothing change. –  ThanaDaray Dec 21 '12 at 16:01
    
@ThanaDaray: Did you take a look at newtext? You would need to write that into your (new) file: with open("newfile.txt", "w" as outfile: outfile.write(newtext) –  Tim Pietzcker Dec 21 '12 at 16:01
    
+1 for regex explanation –  naiquevin Dec 21 '12 at 16:05

Not even necessary to use regex here:

with open("test.txt") as file:
    lines = file.readlines()
    for line in lines:
        if (line.startswith("@") and ":" in line) or line.startswith("rt :"):
            line = " :" + line.split(":", 1)[1]
share|improve this answer
1  
A regex solution is rarely a better solution. –  mmgp Dec 21 '12 at 16:11
    
The original problem had more complex instances of deleting "rt" than the simple "rt :" case you handle. –  Kyle Strand Dec 21 '12 at 16:19
    
According to his wanted output on the OP, this works fine. Read the "I would like to get:" section on the OP. –  user1632861 Dec 21 '12 at 16:25

Try this,

import os

mydict = {"@":'',"rt":''}

filepath = 'C://Users/Desktop/test.txt'
s = open(filepath).read()
for k, v in mydict.iteritems():
    s = s.replace(k, v)
f = open(filepath, 'w')
f.write(s)
f.close()
share|improve this answer
1  
What's the purpose of the import statements here? You're not using walk or any of the other os functions. –  Kyle Strand Dec 21 '12 at 16:03
1  
I like the pattern but I don't think it'll work for the OP's case, because we're not simply removing the @ symbol but the word that starts with @. –  DSM Dec 21 '12 at 16:09
    
@KyleStrand thanks, updated –  Adem Öztaş Dec 21 '12 at 17:17

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