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I'm starting working with C++ templates just because I wanted to understand specific differences with other languages (Java) and I reached a point in which they started to diverge but I'm not getting how I am supposed to solve the specific problem (or get around it).

Suppose I have a generic value class, eg

template <class T>
class Value
{
  protected:
    T value;

  public:
    Value(Type type, T value) : type(type), value(value) {}

    void set(T value) { this->value = value; }
    T get() const { return this->value; }
    T clone() { return new Value<T>(type, value); }

    virtual string svalue() const = 0;

    const Type type;
};

and a specific subtype:

class Int : public Value<int>
{
  public:  
    Int(int value) : Value<int>(INT, value) { };

    virtual string svalue() const { ... }

  friend ostream& operator<<(ostream& os, const Int& v);
};

(I know it is also possible to specify type specific code by using template <> but since I still need to use it enough to understand it I just defined by own Int class for now, which is nothing more that a typedef Value<int> in the end)

Is it possible to have, let's say, a collection that is able to store arbitrary pointers to Value instances? Without the need of specifying the specific concrete type of the generic class.

From what I understand templates are just a compile time issue for which the compiler analyzes all the concrete types for which the template is used and compiles different versions of the same methods for each of them, thus what I'm trying to do doesn't seem to be possible (while in Java I am allowed to use wildcards for something like List<Value<?>>). Am I wrong?

Is there a common design to solve this issue or I am forced to drop templates to achieve it?

share|improve this question
    
Yes, have Value inherit from a common type. –  andre Dec 21 '12 at 16:07

5 Answers 5

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

class Base 
{
    public: virtual void Print() = 0;
};

template<typename T>
class Derived : public Base
{
    T V;
public:
    void Print() { std::cout << V; }
    Derived(T v) : V(v) { }
};

int main()
{
    std::unique_ptr<Base> Ptr (new Derived<int>(5));
    Ptr->Print();

    return 0;
}

I think it's pretty self-explanatory.

share|improve this answer
    
@FredOverflow i second. –  johnathon Dec 21 '12 at 16:09
    
Indeed. Shame on me. –  Bartek Banachewicz Dec 21 '12 at 16:10

Is it possible to have, let's say, a collection that is able to store arbitrary pointers to Value instances?

No, not in the way you seem to want. This is not possible:

template <class T>
class Value
{
// ...
};

vector<Value> my_values_;

This isn't possible because Value isn't a type -- it's really just a blueprint, and idea, if you will. Philisophical ramblings aside, you can't store ideas, you can only store things. A Value isn't a thing.

If this is what you want, then templates might be the wrong tool for the job. Wheat you might really be after are Abstract Base Classes in which the base class (say, class Value) defines the interface and the subclasses (say, class Int : public Value) define concrete types. That way, you can create containers of generic Values, using pointers:

vector<Value*> my_values_;

Or, better yet using smart pointers:

vector<unique_ptr<Value>> my_values_;
share|improve this answer

The Java technique can be done in C++ via a mixture of a common base class (see other answer by Bartek) and techniques like type erasure.

The C++ version, where values are actually values, cannot be done in Java. It can be done in some languages that compile to Java byte code if I recall correctly.

In Java the only objects you can get ahold of are actually more like garbage collected pointers to objects in C++. Actual instances of actual objects being directly stored or referred to is verbotin, because that gets in the way of Java style garbage collection.

So a container of Value<?> in Java is analogous to a container of pointers to a common base class of all Value types that is garbage collected in C++. Access to each instance then involves a dynamic_cast or static_cast equivalent in Java.

For a more Java esque behavior, give Value a common base with a virtual trivial destructor, pure virtual common methods that have the same signature over all instances, template version that implements things with different signatures, and factory functions that produce shared_ptr s to Value instances.

Use containers of shared_ptr to the Value base and use the dynamic shared ptr cast to get particular interfaces if you need them.

Now all of that means your code is 10 to 100 times slower than without all that structure, but it may still be faster than the equivalent Java version. And you have the option to not use it if you do not need it.

share|improve this answer

I always love to confuse matters and throw in a nice syntactic twist although it still just does the same (using a common base class). The only odd bit is that the base class of Value<T> is spelled Value<> and can be used as such in a container (although not directly, of course, since you need use a point to avoid slicing):

#include <memory>
#include <vector>

template <typename T = void>
class Value;

template <>
class Value<void>
{
public:
    virtual ~Value() {}
};

template <typename T>
class Value
    : public Value<>
{
    T value_;
public:
    Value(T value): value_(value) {}
    // whatever
};

template <typename T>
std::unique_ptr<Value<T>> make_value(T value) {
    return std::unique_ptr<Value<T>>(new Value<T>(value));
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Value<>>> values;
    values.push_back(make_value(0));
    values.push_back(make_value(0.0));
    values.push_back(make_value(false));
}
share|improve this answer

Is it possible to have, let's say, a collection that is able to store arbitrary pointers to Value instances?

No, it wouldn't work. However, there are at least to possibilities:

  1. If you know beforehand every type you going to use in list, you can use boost::variant

  2. You may make list of pointers to objects (actually void* or you may drop templates and make Value as base class) and somehow (e.g. dynamic_cast) cast them to some specific objects.

share|improve this answer
    
If you actually need to dynamic_cast, you shouldn't store all of the objects in one container, because what would be the point of it? –  Bartek Banachewicz Dec 22 '12 at 10:25

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