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Trying to get my head around Nokogiri and XPath, and hoping you can help explain this behaviour. This code:

data = Nokogiri::XML(%{
  <veg>
    <peas>
      <color>"green"</color>
    </peas>
    <peas>
      <color>"yellow"</color>
    </peas>
  </veg>
})

data.xpath('//peas').each do |p|
  puts p                            
  puts p.xpath('color/text()')        
  puts p.xpath('//color/text()')    # output not as expected 
end

Gives this output:

<peas>
  <color>"green"</color>
</peas>

"green"

"green"
"yellow"

<peas>
  <color>"yellow"</color>
</peas>

"yellow"

"green"
"yellow"

How does puts p.xpath('//color/text()') end up retrieving both green and yellow, while p only contains one or the other?

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That's a common XPath newbie mistake, thinking //node actually means .//node. –  Mark Thomas Dec 21 '12 at 17:17
1  
Unless you absolutely have to know XPath, I recommend using CSS with Nokogiri. CSS accessors are simpler, and easier to read for the most part. XPath is capable of very complex searches though, so I use it for those special occasions. Try data.search('peas color').map(&:text). –  the Tin Man Dec 22 '12 at 3:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since it's breaking down the <peas> nodes into p, and iterating through them, it is first displaying the node itself

<peas>
  <color>"green"</color>
</peas>

and

<peas>
  <color>"yellow"</color>
</peas>

and then the <color> node's text of each p as well.

THEN, we get to //color/text(), and '//' says start over at the root, and get all <color> nodes, and the text() associated with them, which is why you get both Green and Yellow colors, even while iterating through each <peas> node separately.

So for another example, if we had iterated to the node veg/peas[color='green'], and then said find //peas, we would get back both <peas> nodes for yellow and green.

color/text() says "start from current node, and grab me the text of the child node <color>" and //color/text() says "give me the text of all <color> nodes in the XML, regardless of current location"

Let me know if I need to clarify anything...

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