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I have written the following program to calculate the sum of all multiples of 3 & 5 below 1000 in scheme. However, it gives me an incorrect output. Any help would be much appreciated.

(define  (multiples)
   (define  (calc  a sum ctr cir)
      (cond (> a 1000) (sum)
            (= ctr 7) (calc (+ a (list-ref cir 0)) (+ sum a) 0 (list 3 2 1 3 1 2 3))
             (else (calc (+ a (list-ref cir ctr)) (+ sum a) (+ 1 ctr) (list 3 2 1 3 1 2 3)))))
    (calc 0 0 0 (list 3 2 1 3 1 2 3)))
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I have no idea how your algorithm is supposed to work. How did you arrive at that magic list (3 2 1 3 1 2 3)? What is the significance of that magic number 7? Your cond form does not seem to have the semantics you intend. You should also tell us what the incorrect output is (it seems to be 1000, but I have not tested it). –  Svante Dec 22 '12 at 17:04
    
@Svante According to the comment to sinan's answer, the list is the differences between successive multiples of 3 or 5, so that adding them one by on (starting from 0) will give the first 7 multiples (3, 5, 6, 9, 10, 12 and 15). Then the list is reused. See my answer for a corrected function, and also a non-recursive implementation of the same algorithm. –  Terje D. Dec 23 '12 at 10:26

6 Answers 6

You can simply port imperative style solution to functional Scheme by using an accumulator(sum parameter) and a target parameter to test when to stop summing:

(define (multiples)
  (define (multiples-iter num sum target)
    (if (> num target)
      sum
      (multiples-iter (+ 1 num)
                      (if (or (zero? (mod num 3)) (zero? (mod num 5)))
                        (+ sum num)
                        sum)
                      target)))
  (multiples-iter 0 0 1000))
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Thanks, but I was actually trying to write a programs using repeating patterns. eg. to get multiples of 3 & 5 iterate over the following list 0 + (3,2,1,3,1,2,3) and so on. –  user1921992 Dec 21 '12 at 16:52
    
what do you mean by "repeating patterns" ? –  sinan Dec 21 '12 at 16:54
    
if I start with 0, I add the following nos (3,2,1,2,1,2,3) over and over again, it will give me all the multiples of 3 & 5. –  user1921992 Dec 21 '12 at 16:55

Here's my (Racket-specific) solution, which doesn't involve lots of (or, for that matter, any) modulo calls, and is completely general (so that you don't need to construct the (3 2 1 3 1 2 3) list that the OP has):

(define (sum-of-multiples a b limit)
  (define (sum-of-multiple x)
    (for/fold ((sum 0))
              ((i (in-range 0 limit x)))
      (+ sum i)))
  (- (+ (sum-of-multiple a) (sum-of-multiple b))
     (sum-of-multiple (lcm a b))))

Test run:

> (sum-of-multiples 3 5 1000)
233168
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If you're using Racket, there's a very compact way to do what you ask, using looping constructs:

(for/fold ([sum 0])
  ([i (in-range 1 1000)]
   #:when (or (zero? (modulo i 3)) (zero? (modulo i 5))))
  (+ sum i))

=> 233168
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Your answer has the same idea as mine, but mine is faster. :-D Though, +1 for the reminder of #:when (I wrote a very similar thing to yours to validate my solution, but I used a manual if). –  Chris Jester-Young Dec 21 '12 at 17:02

One problem is that your code is missing a pair of parentheses around the cond clauses. In the line (cond (> a 1000) (sum) the condition is just> while a and 1000 are interpreted as forms to be evaluated if > is true (which it is), and thus 1000 will be returned as the result.

Two other problem (masked by the first one) is that you are initializing ctr to 0 when it reaches 7, while it should be set to the next value, i.e. 1, and that you are including 1000 in the result.

The corrected version of your function is

(define  (multiples)
   (define  (calc  a sum ctr cir)
      (cond ((>= a 1000) sum)
            ((= ctr 7) (calc (+ a (list-ref cir 0)) (+ sum a) 1 (list 3 2 1 3 1 2 3)))
             (else (calc (+ a (list-ref cir ctr)) (+ sum a) (+ 1 ctr) (list 3 2 1 3 1 2 3)))))
    (calc 0 0 0 (list 3 2 1 3 1 2 3)))

The same algorithm can also be defined as a non-recursive function like this:

(define (multiples)                                                             
  (do ((cir (list 3 2 1 3 1 2 3))                                               
       (ctr 0 (+ ctr 1))                                                        
       (a 0 (+ a (list-ref cir (modulo ctr 7))))                                
       (sum 0 (+ sum a)))                                                       
      ((>= a 1000) sum)))  
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(require-extension (srfi 1))
(define (sum-mod-3-5 upto)
  (define (%sum-mod-3-5 so-far generator-position steps)
    (let ((next (car generator-position)))
      (if (> (+ steps next) upto)
          so-far
          (%sum-mod-3-5 (+ so-far steps)
                        (cdr generator-position)
                        (+ steps next)))))
  (%sum-mod-3-5 0 (circular-list 3 2 1 3 1 2 3) 0)) ; 233168

For this particular task, it will do on average half the operations then you would do if incrementing the counter by one, also, one less if condition to check.

Also, modulo (as being division in disguise, probably) is more expensive then summation.

EDIT: I'm not a pro on modular system in different dialects of Scheme. The SRFI-1 extension here is only required to make it easier to create a circular list. I couldn't find an analogue to Common Lisp (#0=(3 2 1 3 1 2 3) . #0#), but perhaps, someone more knowledgeable will correct this.

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R7RS directly supports that syntax. For R5RS, SRFI 38 has a specialised reader that can read that syntax. A number of Scheme implementations support it out of the box. –  Chris Jester-Young Dec 21 '12 at 19:51

If you absolutely want to use the "repeating pattern" method, you could go about it something like this.

This uses recursion on the list of intervals rather than relying on list-ref and explicit indexing.

(define (mults limit)
  (define steps '(3 2 1 3 1 2 3))
  (define (mults-help a sum ls)
    (cond ((>= a limit) sum)
          ((null? ls) (mults-help a sum steps))
          (else (mults-help (+ a (car ls)) 
                            (+ a sum)  
                            (cdr ls)))))
  (mults-help 0 0 steps))
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