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Is there a way of passing in a method to a function as a parameter and then calling it via list.Sort()? I've tried this:

public static string BuildHumanSitemap(Func<TreeNode, TreeNode, int> sortMethod, params string[] classNames)
{
    //calling list sort on method passed as parameter
    nodes.sort(sortMethod);
 }

Where the functions i want to pass in all take the same params e.g.

private static int SortByDateCreated(TreeNode x, TreeNode y)
{
    DateTime xT = (DateTime)x["DocumentCreatedWhen"];
    DateTime yT = (DateTime)y["DocumentCreatedWhen"];
    return xT.CompareTo(yT);
}

I've also tried using an Action delegate type but the sort method complains when i pass it as a parameter. Can anyone offer a suggestion on how to do this?

Thankyou

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Can you show us what you tried? Also, you said the sort method complains when you use Action, can you please post what the error message is? –  Jetti Dec 21 '12 at 16:29
    
What's the type of nodes? And more specifically what's the signature for the sort method? –  Brian Rasmussen Dec 21 '12 at 16:30
1  
If you're talking about List<T>.Sort, that method does not provide an overload that takes a delegate. –  Andrew Whitaker Dec 21 '12 at 16:30
    
@BrianRasmussen nodes is a List<TreeNode>. Sort is just a List<T>.Sort(). @Andrew so i guess what i want to achieve is not possible? –  DGibbs Dec 21 '12 at 16:33
    
@DGibbs: Not via any built-in library functions that I know of, you could write an extension method to do it though. –  Andrew Whitaker Dec 21 '12 at 16:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Create new Comparison delegate and pass it to Sort method:

nodes.Sort(new Comparison<TreeNode>(sortMethod));
share|improve this answer
1  
Perfect, thank you very much –  DGibbs Dec 21 '12 at 16:37

Maybe instead of taking in a Func<,,> delegate, you should consume a Comparison<> delegate. Because that's what List<> wants (for historical reasons; the List<>.Sort method was written for .NET 2.0, before the Func delegates were introduced).

Therefore:

public static string BuildHumanSitemap(Comparison<TreeNode> sortMethod, params string[] classNames)
{
  //calling list sort on method passed as parameter
  nodes.Sort(sortMethod);
}

Then call your method very simply like this:

BuildHumanSitemap(SortByDateCreated);

where SortByDateCreated is the "method group" from your question.

There's no need for first creating a delegate instance of type Func<TreeNode, TreeNode, int> and then create another delegate instance (of type Comparison<TreeNode>) which references the first one.

Of course you can also call your BuildHumanSitemap method with a lambda arrow as the first argument.

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I like this way better, have a +1 –  DGibbs Jan 2 '13 at 15:25
    
@DGibbs Thanks. You can even change your "accept" mark to honor this answer (but only if you feel it's better than the answer you previously accepted). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 2 '13 at 15:40

It works this way:

  TreeView.TreeViewNodeSorter = new CustomNodeSorter();

  private class CustomNodeSorter : IComparer
  {
     public int Compare(object x, object y)
     {
         DateTime xT = (DateTime)x["DocumentCreatedWhen"];
         DateTime yT = (DateTime)y["DocumentCreatedWhen"];
         return xT.CompareTo(yT);
     }
  }
share|improve this answer

Solution with IComparer<T>.

Comparer

public class MyTreeNodeComparer : IComparer<TreeNode>
{
     public int Compare(TreeNode x, TreeNode y)
     {
         DateTime xT = (DateTime)x["DocumentCreatedWhen"];
         DateTime yT = (DateTime)y["DocumentCreatedWhen"];
         return xT.CompareTo(yT);
     }
}

Usage

list.Sort(new MyTreeNodeComparer());
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