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I have written this code in C and it works well for small inputs and all the test cases I can think of. But when a large file is given as an input, it gives SIGABRT error. Can someone explain me the reason for it?

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>

void q_sort(char **numbers, int left, int right)
{
    int  l_hold, r_hold,temp;  
    char *pivot;

    l_hold = left;
    r_hold = right;
    pivot = numbers[left];

    while (left < right)
    {
        while (strcmp(numbers[right],pivot)>=0 && (left < right))
            right--;

        if (left != right)
        {
            numbers[left] = numbers[right];
            left++;
        }

        while (strcmp(numbers[left],pivot)<0 && (left < right))
            left++;

        if (left != right)
        {
            numbers[right] = numbers[left];
            right--;
        }
    }

    numbers[left] = pivot;
    temp = left;
    left = l_hold;
    right = r_hold;

    if (left < temp)
        q_sort(numbers, left, temp-1);

    if (right > temp)
        q_sort(numbers, temp+1, right);
}

int main()
{   
    int x,y,i,j;
    int *arr;
    char **str;
    int *count;
    while(1)
    {
        scanf("%d%d",&x,&y);
        if(x==0 && y==0)break;
        str =(char **)malloc(sizeof(char *)*x);
        count=(int*)malloc(sizeof(int)*x);
        i=0;
        while(i<x)
        {
            str[i]=(char *)malloc(sizeof(char)*y);
            scanf("%s",str[i]);
            i++;
        }
        //sizeof(str)/sizeof(*str)
        q_sort(str,0,x-1);// sizeof(str) / sizeof(char *), sizeof(char *),cmp);
        i=0;
        j=0;
        arr=(int *)malloc(sizeof(int)*x);
        while(i<x)
        {
            arr[j]=1;
            while(i<x-1 && strcmp(str[i],str[i+1])==0)
            {
                i++;
                arr[j]+=1;
            }
            j++;
            i++;
        }

        for(i=0;i<x;i++)
        {
            count[i]=0;
        }
        i=0;
        while(i<j)
        {
            count[arr[i]-1]++;
            i++;
        }
        for(i=0;i<x;i++)
        {
            printf("%d\n",count[i]);
        }
        free(count);
        free(arr);
        for(i=0;i<x;i++)
            free(str[i]);
        free(str);

    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
3  
Did you try a debugger? –  Carl Norum Dec 21 '12 at 17:54
1  
An SSCCE means that you provide something compact. Don't expect us to read that whole wall of messy, badly formatted code. –  user529758 Dec 21 '12 at 17:55
    
Compile with all warnings & debugging info, i.e. with gcc -Wall -g and debug with gdb and valgrind; the "%d%d" format of scanf seems really suspicious (or at least, check the result of scanf) –  Basile Starynkevitch Dec 21 '12 at 17:56
    
You're missing #include <stdlib.h>. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 21 '12 at 17:59

1 Answer 1

Given a data file:

20 20
absinthe000001
absinthe000002
...
absinthe000020

Valgrind warns (repeatedly):

==27941== Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s)
==27941==    at 0xCB9A: strcmp (mc_replace_strmem.c:721)
==27941==    by 0x100000AAB: q_sort (qs.c:16)
==27941== 

I also get reams of lines containing 1 or 0.

You've got subscripts out of control. Add printing of subscripts to your quicksort routine to see what's going wrong. Add printing after you've read the data, to make sure your data is what you think it should be.

You say:

it works well for small inputs and all the test cases I can think of

When I try:

0 20

as the input, it misbehaves badly:

==28056== 
==28056== Invalid read of size 8
==28056==    at 0x100000A63: q_sort (qs.c:12)
==28056==  Address 0x100006160 is 0 bytes after a block of size 0 alloc'd
==28056==    at 0xB823: malloc (vg_replace_malloc.c:266)
==28056==    by 0x100000BB7: main (qs.c:57)
==28056== 

When I try:

1 20
absinthe000001

I get a long stream of 1's printed. When I try:

2 20
absinthe000001
absinthe000002

I get a long stream of alternating 0's and 1's. Frankly, I don't think you've tried many cases. Sort code needs to be able to handle 0, 1, 2 rows correctly.

Part of the trouble is, of course, that you have a while (1) loop and you then don't check your scanf() calls.

while(1)
{
    scanf("%d%d",&x,&y);

Wrong test!

while (1)
{
    if (scanf("%d%d", &x, &y) != 2)
        break;

Don't use scanf(); it is far too hard for novice programmers to use correctly. I've only been programming in C over a quarter of a century; I don't use scanf() except to answer SO questions that use it. I use fgets() to read lines and sscanf() to parse them; much, much simpler to handle correctly, and you get better error reporting out of it to (because you can report the whole erroneous line, not just what's left over after scanf() has mangled it).

char buffer[4096];

while (fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), stdin) != 0)
{
    if (sscanf(buffer, "%d%d", &x, &y) != 2)
        break;
    str = (char **)malloc(sizeof(char *)*x);
    count = (int*)malloc(sizeof(int)*x);
    for (i = 0; i < x; i++)
    {
        if (fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), stdin) != 0)
            break;
        str[i] = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char)*y);
        if (sscanf(buffer, "%s", str[i]) != 1)
            break;
    }

You should check the results of the malloc() calls; if they fail, you'll get a segmentation violation or something similar. Arguably, you should create a format string that prevents overflows as you're reading data into str[i].

share|improve this answer
    
So true. scanf is easily used incorrectly. –  Shane Hsu Dec 21 '12 at 18:21

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