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I found that in Java, there is a feature called static block, which includes code that is executed when a class is first loaded (I don't understand what 'loaded' means, does it mean initialized?). Is there any reason to do the initialization bit inside a static block and not in the constructor? I mean, even the constructor does the same thing, do all the necessary stuff when a class is first initialized. is there anything that the static block accomplishes which a constructor can't?

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Called once when the class is loaded by the class loader. Not each time the class is instantiated. –  amadeus Dec 21 '12 at 18:00
    
Please, take a look at the following chapters of the Official Java Tutorial (from Oracle): Understanding Instance and Class Members and Initializing Fields. Come back if you still have any doubts. –  Anthony Accioly Dec 21 '12 at 18:02
    
Just a non-sequitur question, if a class happens to have both main and a constructor, which one is invoked earlier when an instance of the class is created? –  Cupidvogel Dec 21 '12 at 18:10
    
Initialization code (Classloading time) -> Main (Application entry point) -> Constructors: Here's a working example to further illustrate the point. –  Anthony Accioly Dec 21 '12 at 18:27
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@Cupidvogel The main method is not run every time an instance of a class is created. It is only run when either explicitly invoked (just like any other static method) or when the JVM begins the application. –  Tom G Dec 21 '12 at 19:42
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9 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If a class has static members that require complex initialization, a static block is the tool to use. Suppose you need a static map of some kind (the purpose is irrelevant here). You can declare it in-line like this:

public static final Map<String, String> initials = new HashMap<String, String>();

However, if you want to populate it once, you can't do that with an in-line declaration. For that, you need a static block:

public static final Map<String, String> initials = new HashMap<String, String>();
static {
    initials.put("AEN", "Alfred E. Newman");
    // etc.
}

If you wanted to be even more protective, you can do this:

public static final Map<String, String> initials;
static {
    HashMap<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>()
    map.put("AEN", "Alfred E. Newman");
    // etc.
    initials = Collections.unmodifiableMap(map);
}

Note that you cannot initialize initials in-line as an unmodifiable map because then you couldn't populate it! You also cannot do this in a constructor because simply calling one of the modifying methods (put, etc.) will generate an exception.

To be fair, this is not a complete answer to your question. The static block could still be eliminated by using a private static function:

public static final Map<String, String> initials = makeInitials();

private static Map<String, String> makeInitials() {
    HashMap<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>()
    map.put("AEN", "Alfred E. Newman");
    // etc.
    return Collections.unmodifiableMap(map);
}

Note, though, that this is not replacing a static block with code in a constructor as you proposed!

A case where a static block would be awkward to replace would be a "master" class that needs to initialize several other classes exactly once.

public class Master {
    static {
        SlaveClass1.init();
        SlaveClass2.init(SlaveClass1.someInitializedValue);
        // etc.
    }
}

Particularly if you don't want to hard-wire any dependence into SlaveClass2 on SlaveClass1, some sort of master code like this is needed. This kind of stuff most definitely does not belong in a constructor.

Note that there is also something called an instance initializer block. It is an anonymous block of code that is run when each instance is created. (The syntax is just like a static block, but without the static keyword.) It is particularly useful for anonymous classes, because they cannot have named constructors. Here's a real-world example. Since (unfathomably) GZIPOutputStream does not have a constructor or any api call with which you can specify a compression level, and the default compression level is none, you need to subclass GZIPOutputStream to get any compression. You can always write an explicit subclass, but it can be more convenient to write an anonymous class:

OutputStream os = . . .;
OutputStream gzos = new GZIPOutputStream(os) {
    {
        // def is an inherited, protected field that does the actual compression
        def = new Deflator(9, true); // maximum compression, no ZLIB header
    }
};
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Why can't I just do it inside the constructor? –  Cupidvogel Dec 21 '12 at 18:08
    
@Cupidvogel What if the class has no constructors? java.lang.Math only contains static methods and is never instantiated for example. (Although Math contains a constructor, but curiously that constructor is there to make sure no instances are created.) –  biziclop Dec 21 '12 at 18:10
    
Another typical usage of static initialisers is the loading of a native library for classes that have native methods, like this: static { System.loadLibrary ("foo"); } –  biziclop Dec 21 '12 at 18:11
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@Cupidvogel - Since the variable is declared both static and final (so that it cannot be changed), the language will not allow you to do it in the constructor. –  Ted Hopp Dec 21 '12 at 18:13
    
What do you mean by What if the class has no constructors?? I want to know is there any particular case where a constructor can't do something the static block can do? –  Cupidvogel Dec 21 '12 at 18:14
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The static initializer runs when the class is loaded even if you never create any objects of that type.

  • Not all classes are meant to be instantiated. The constructor might never be called. It might even be private.
  • You may wish to access static fields of the class before you run a constructor.
  • The static initializer only runs once when the class is loaded. The constructor is called for each object of that type you instantiate.
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Constructor is invoked when a Object of that class is created.

Static block is invoked when a classloader loads this class definition, so that we can initialize static members of this class. We should not be initializing static members from constructor as they are part of class definition not object

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Please explain what you mean by 'load'. –  Cupidvogel Dec 21 '12 at 18:01
    
Each class needs to be loaded to jvm via a classloader, It can happen when a object of the type of that class is requested in code or a static variable is requested in code. For eg: int b= ClassA.staticMenber; staticMember is a static variable present in ClassA, which can be initilized in static block. –  Subin Dec 21 '12 at 18:05
    
So essentially you mean 'when a instance of that class is first created' by 'loaded', right? –  Cupidvogel Dec 21 '12 at 18:07
    
please see the edit. it can be when instance created, or a static reference made. –  Subin Dec 21 '12 at 18:08
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You can't initialize static variables with a constructor -- or at least you probably shouldn't, and it won't be particularly useful.

Especially when you're trying to initialize static constants that require significant logic to generate, that really ought to happen in a static block, not a constructor.

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Would the downvoter care to explain? –  Louis Wasserman Dec 21 '12 at 17:59
    
I wasn't the downvoter but I suspect the problem was that technically you can initialise static variables in a constructor. –  biziclop Dec 21 '12 at 18:07
    
You can, but there's little point, which is what I said. –  Louis Wasserman Dec 21 '12 at 18:13
    
I agree with you completely, it was just a theory about the reason of the downvote. –  biziclop Dec 21 '12 at 18:15
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They're two separate things. You use a constructor to initialize one instance of a class, the static initialization block initializes static members at the time that the class is loaded.

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static block does different thing than constructor . Basically there sre two different concepts.

static block initializes when class load into memory , it means when JVM read u'r byte code. Initialization can ne anything , it can be variable initialization or any thing else which should be shared by all objects of that class

whereas constructor initializes variable for that object only .

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Static initializer will run if we initialize a class, this does not require that we instantiate a class. But the constructor is run only when we make an instance of the class.

For example:

class MyClass
{   
    static
    {
        System.out.println("I am static initializer");
    }
    MyClass()
    {
        System.out.println("I am constructor");
    }

    static void staticMethod()
    {
        System.out.println("I am static method");
    }
}

If we run:

MyClass.staticMethod();

Output:

I am static initializer
I am static method

We never created an instance so the constructor is not called, but static initializer is called.

If we make an instance of a class, both static initilizer and the constructor run. No surprises.

MyClass x = new MyClass();

Output:

I am static initializer
I am constructor

Note that if we run:

MyClass x;

Output: (empty)

Declaring variable x does not require MyClass to be initialized, so static initializer does not run.

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You are misinterpreting what's going on. Static blocks are run when the class is initialized. It's just that simply declaring a variable MyClass x does not require that the class be loaded or initialized. Java is smart enough to know that it can defer loading and initializing the class until something about it (other than it's name) is actually needed. (By the way, simply referencing a static field of the class will also cause the class to be initialized. You don't need to create an instance or call a method.) –  Ted Hopp Dec 21 '12 at 19:42
    
Thank you for the clarification! –  Akavall Dec 21 '12 at 19:45
    
@Ted Hopp I edited my answer to reflect your point, which basically the gist of my answer now. –  Akavall Dec 21 '12 at 19:51
    
Much improved. However, I don't see how this addresses OP's question. –  Ted Hopp Dec 21 '12 at 19:55
    
@Ted Hopp, the OP is basically asking about the difference between static initializer and constructor. OP's last question is "is there anything that the static block accomplishes which a constructor can't". My answer illustrates that static initializer is run when instance of of MyClass is not created, while constructor is not. This is something that static initializer can do, and constructor cannot do. –  Akavall Dec 21 '12 at 20:04
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The static block is reqly useful when you do have to do some action even if no instances is still created. As example, for initializing a static variable with non static value.

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The static block is useful when you want to initialize static fields.

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