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I am missing something basic here but cannot figure it out yet. Below is the code that is troubling me.

class A
{
public:
    A();
    ~A();

    initialize();
    addToMap(const string& k, const string& v);

private:
    map<string, string> someMap;
};

class B
{
public:
    B(A* aa);
    ~B();

    parse(const char* fileName);

private:
    A* a_ptr;
};

A::A()
{
}

A:~A()
{
}

A::initialize()
{
    B *b = new B(this);
    b->parse("file_path");
    // don't need 'b' anymore; so delete
    delete b;   // program crashes here
}

A::addToMap(const string& k, const string& v)
{
    someMap[k] = v;
}

B::B(A* aa) : a_ptr(aa)
{
}

B::~B()
{
}

B::parse(const char* fileName)
{
    // do some processing

    a_ptr->addToMap("keyA", "valueA");
}

main()
{
    A *a = new A();
    a->initialize(); // crash inside method

    // more processing
}

My program crashes at the line where I delete the pointer to B in A's initialize method. I don't seem to understand this behavior. If I had a delete a_ptr; inside B's destructor, the crash might be understandable(?).
To clarify the idea of A-B relationship - B is owned by A. Users of A do not care how A initializes its map. In this example it is using B but this is internal to A. B is just a file parser and once the file is read, I do not need B.

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closed as too localized by djechlin, WhozCraig, Ed Heal, the Tin Man, CoolBeans Dec 22 '12 at 6:18

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
Um... It appears you have absolutely no reason to declare b as a pointer. You should be declaring b as a non-pointer and allowing it to fall out of scope. – meagar Dec 21 '12 at 18:03
3  
Well, once I cleaned up all of your own compile errors, the program ran with no error. As suspected the problem is in //some processing or //more processing. – djechlin Dec 21 '12 at 18:06
1  
I'm not seeing anything that immediately stands out. It's very possible that the error is occurring someplace else, perhaps you overwrite past the end of some memory that was allocated and corrupted the heap. Then the error just shows up here when you try and free some memory. – Jonathan Wood Dec 21 '12 at 18:06
    
Maybe the compiler optimized your code and added a delete aa in the deconstructor of B. So when you delete B you also delete aa and and that is where you are calling from. Is that possible? Im just guessing. – fonZ Dec 21 '12 at 18:10
    
That code is fine (aside from the handful of compiler errors). – Ryan Guthrie Dec 21 '12 at 18:28

There’s probably a memory corruption somewhere else that just occurs by accident in B::parse(…). Valgrind’s memcheck might help to find the source of the problem. It’s also interesting to check if the behavior is different with and without compiler optimizations.

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