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I understand how the "new" keyword can hide methods in a derived class. However, what implications does it have for classes that implement interfaces that use the keyword?

Consider this example, where I decide to expand an interface by making its properties read/write.

public interface IReadOnly {

   string Id {
      get;
   }
}

public interface ICanReadAndWrite : IReadOnly  {

   new string Id {
      get;
      set;
   }
}

Then you are able to do things like this:

public IReadOnly SomeMethod() {
   // return an instance of ICanReadAndWrite
}

Is this bad design? Will it cause issues for my classes that implement ICanReadAndWrite?

Edit: Here is a contrived example of why I might want to do something like this:

Say I have a factory class that returns an IShoppingCartItemReadWrite. I can then have a service layer that manipulates prices on it, changes stuff, etc. Then, I can pass these objects as IShoppingCartItemReadOnly to some kind of presentation layer that won't change them. (Yes, I know it technically can change them-- this is a design question, not security, etc.)

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Your specific example doesn't make much sense. If you can read and write, then it is not readonly. –  Samuel Carrijo Sep 9 '09 at 13:16
    
An IShoppingCartItemReadWrite can be changed, but if I have a reference to an IShoppingCartItemReadOnly, it is read-only unless you cast it to something else. –  user10789 Sep 9 '09 at 13:20
    
Note that you don't actually need the "new" keyword there though. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Sep 9 '09 at 13:22
    
What does the "new" keyword have to do with all of this? –  Pop Catalin Sep 9 '09 at 13:25
    
I suspect better names for your type would be "IReadable" and "IMutable". –  supercat Jul 6 '11 at 20:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

It's not a particularly bad idea. You should be aware that the implementor can (if it implicitly implements the interface, then a single read/write property could satisfy both interfaces) provide two distinct implementations:

class Test : ICanReadAndWrite {
   public string Id {
      get { return "100"; }
      set { }
   }
   string IReadOnly.Id {
      get { return "10"; }
   }
}

Test t = new Test();
Console.WriteLine(t.Id);  // prints 100
Console.WriteLine(((IReadOnly)t).Id); // prints 10

By the way, in general, the new inheritance modifier does nothing except to tell the compiler to shut up and don't throw out a "you're hiding that member" warning. Omitting it will have no effect in the compiled code.

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1  
Good point about silencing the compiler warning! However, it complains because doing something like this for class definitions can make them behave in ways you might not expect. For this particular case, I can't think of any unintended behavior... hence the question. –  user10789 Sep 9 '09 at 13:11
1  
Yes. Of course the warning is for a reason. The only possible gotcha is, as I said in the answer, the fact that you are dealing with two distinct method slots that might resolve to different implementations. This is the pitfall of using new. For interfaces it's not harmful most of the time since they don't provide any implementation and the caller expects an arbitrary implementation of the method anyway. –  Mehrdad Afshari Sep 9 '09 at 13:19
1  
the new keyword is not for silencing the compiler, it's for clearly stating that "I don't want to override any member, my intent is to shadow it, and I'm aware of the fact". The warning is to keep you from "unintentionally hiding a member". –  Pop Catalin Sep 9 '09 at 13:23
    
Yep, and as I mentioned in a comment below, I would expect a class that explicitly implements both interfaces to have a reason to do so. –  user10789 Sep 9 '09 at 13:25
1  
@Pop Catalin: The point is, mentioning new doesn't affect code generation. It is the default behavior (which this is not the case for override). –  Mehrdad Afshari Sep 9 '09 at 13:35

You should not implement the ICanReadWrite based on IReadOnly, but instead make them separate.

ie. like this:

public interface IReadOnly
{
    string Id
    {
        get;
    }
}

public interface ICanReadAndWrite
{
    string Id
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

Here's a class using them:

public class SomeObject : IReadOnly, ICanReadWrite
{
    public string Id
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

Note that the same property in the class can support both interfaces.

Note that as per the comment, the only way to get a robust solution would be to also have a wrapper object.

In other words, this is not good:

public class SomeObject : IReadOnly, ICanReadWrite
{
    public string Id
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public IReadOnly AsReadOnly()
    {
        return this;
    }
}

as the caller can just do this:

ICanReadWrite rw = obj.AsReadOnly() as ICanReadWrite;
rw.Id = "123";

To get a robust solution, you need a wrapper object, like this:

public class SomeObject : IReadOnly, ICanReadWrite
{
    public string Id
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public IReadOnly AsReadOnly()
    {
        return new ReadOnly(this);
    }
}

public class ReadOnly : IReadOnly
{
    private IReadOnly _WrappedObject;

    public ReadOnly(IReadOnly wrappedObject)
    {
        _WrappedObject = wrappedObject;
    }

    public string Id
    {
        get { return _WrappedObject.Id; }
    }
}

This will work, and be robust, right up until the point where the caller uses reflection.

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1  
But then you can't cast from an ICanReadAndWrite to an IReadOnly. This is very useful when you have a class that is working with read/write objects, then only want to return a read-only object to the consumer. –  user10789 Sep 9 '09 at 13:05
    
The consumer can just cast back though. This isn't robust. –  recursive Sep 9 '09 at 13:12
1  
Of course it isn't robust, but neither was the original solution, if it had worked. The only way to get rid of the writeability is to return a wrapping object that explicitly prevents it, ie. only implements IReadOnly. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Sep 9 '09 at 13:15
1  
First, the code in my original question does compile and work. And it is robust enough-- if you downcast a type, you had better know what you are doing. +1 for the note about a read-only wrapper, though. –  user10789 Sep 9 '09 at 13:23
    
Yes, sorry, I had mistyped some code when I pasted it at first, which lead me to believe there was something wrong with the code. It was my fault, however, but I'll leave the comment. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Sep 9 '09 at 13:28

This is perfectly legal and the implications for your class that implements the ICanReadAndWrite interface would simply be that when it is treated as an IReadOnly it can only read, but when treated as ICanReadAndWrite it would be able to do both.

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I'm not sure if that compiles or not, but is not an advisable pattern to follow. With the ability to do explicit interface implementation, you could theoretically provide two entirely different implementations for the IReadOnly and ICanReadAndWrite versiond of the Id property. Consider altering the ICanReadAndWrite interface by adding a setter method for the property rather than replacing the property.

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It definitely compiles. If you DON'T add the new keyword, you get the following compilation warning: 'ICanReadAndWrite.Id' hides inherited member 'IReadOnly.Id'. Use the new keyword if hiding was intended. –  user10789 Sep 9 '09 at 13:00
    
Regarding explicit interface implementation, I assume that if you do that, two entirely different implementations of the Id property is exactly what you would want. I'm more interested in the hidden gotchas or less-than-obvious problems that may be caused by this approach. –  user10789 Sep 9 '09 at 13:02
1  
Regrettably, simply adding a setter to the property won't work. If the setter shadows the getter, reading the property requires a typecast to the type with the un-shadowed getter. If the setter doesn't shadow the getter, i.e. an independent getter and setter are both in scope, neither will be usable within C# or vb.net. –  supercat Jul 6 '11 at 20:25

You can do it but I am not sure what you hope to accomplish by doing it.

public IReadOnly SomeMethod() {
   // return an instance of ICanReadAndWrite
}

This method will return a reference to an IReadOnly which means that it doesn't matter that you have returned an ICanReadAndWrite. Wouldn't this approach be better?

public interface IReadOnly
{
    String GetId();
}

public interface ICanReadAndWrite : IReadOnly
{
    String SetId();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would like to use a simple property. –  user10789 Sep 9 '09 at 13:07

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