Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to write a little program that read from a file. I tryied this codes from a file (random.dat) that contains the following numbers:

0.575 0.235
0.456 0.322

The code that I wrote is the following:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#define N 2

int main (void) {
  FILE *fp;
  int i, j;
  double x,y,data[N][N] = {{0}};

  if ((fp = fopen("random.dat", "r")) == NULL ) {
    printf("Error\n");
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }

  fp = fopen("random.dat","r");
  printf("\n");

  for (i=0;i<N;i++){
    fscanf(fp,"%lf",&x);
    for(j=0;j<N;j++){
      fscanf(fp,"%lf",&x); 
      data[i][j] = x;
      printf("data[%d][%d]=%lf\n",i,j,data[i][j]);  
    }   
  }
  printf("\n");
  fclose(fp);
return(0);
}

Does the code is well written?

I don't understand why the terminal write:

data[0][0]=0.235000
data[0][1]=0.465000
data[1][0]=0.322000
data[1][1]=0.322000

Instead of:

data[0][0]=0.575000
data[0][1]=0.235000
data[1][0]=0.465000
data[1][1]=0.322000

Any idea? Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
Well, considering that your code has poor formatting by any standard, generates several warnings, and isn't very standard-compliant, I'd put it firmly in the 'not well written' camp. If, in addition, it doesn't seem to work, then no, I guess it really isn't well written. – Carl Norum Dec 21 '12 at 18:23
1  
"Does the code is well written?" - the fact you omitted the return type of main() returns false for that assertion already on the 4th line. – user529758 Dec 21 '12 at 18:26
    
My terminal doesn t give me any warning nor errors... anyway i ll edit the code with a int main (void) and a return(0) if it gives you problems... – Valerio D. Ciotti Dec 21 '12 at 18:31
    
I'm not going to go into the errors you're getting -- most of them are actually being caused by your style. As an afterthought, I would go ahead and post this on the Code Review StackExchange once you have your functional errors sorted. – Sean Allred Dec 21 '12 at 18:32
    
@Valerio, you also have an unused variable y, so that would warn too, though maybe you need to turn up the warnings setting you pass to your compiler. – Carl Norum Dec 21 '12 at 18:33
up vote 0 down vote accepted

replace statements,

for (i=0;i<N;i++){
   fscanf(fp,"%lf",&x);
   for(j=0;j<N;j++){
     fscanf(fp,"%lf",&x); 
     data[i][j] = x;
     printf("data[%d][%d]=%lf\n",i,j,data[i][j]);  
   }   
}

with

 for (i=0;i<N;i++){
    for(j=0;j<N;j++){
        fscanf(fp,"%lf",&x);
        data[i][j] = x;
        printf("data[%d][%d]=%lf\n",i,j,data[i][j]);
     }
 }
share|improve this answer

In this nested loop (reformatted to be easier to read):

for (i=0; i<N; i++)
{
    fscanf(fp, "%lf", &x);   // first fscanf

    for(j=0; j<N; j++)
    {
        fscanf(fp, "%lf", &x); // second fscanf
        data[i][j] = x;
        printf("data[%d][%d]=%lf\n", i, j, data[i][j]);  
    }    
}

You'll see that the inner loop immediately overwrites the x value read in your outer loop. That means you essentially skip reading the first number in the file entirely. Later that causes one of the inner-loop fscanf calls to fail, but since you don't check the return value, your program doesn't notice.

Just delete the first fscanf() line and you'll be set.

As an editorial aside, if you step through your program with a debugger, you'd see this problem happening immediately.

share|improve this answer
2  
and also why fopen("random.dat","r"); two times ?? – solti Dec 21 '12 at 18:29
    
+1 @gunda. I didn't see that, but he could delete that too. – Carl Norum Dec 21 '12 at 18:30
    
it should be a control to see if there is or not the file to read – Valerio D. Ciotti Dec 21 '12 at 18:33
    
@Valerio, you don't have to do it twice to find that out. – Carl Norum Dec 21 '12 at 18:34
    
@Carl Ok thanks, I m still at the begging, I ll take it as a good advice, thank you! – Valerio D. Ciotti Dec 21 '12 at 18:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.