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I cant seem to figure out why this is not working correctly. Here are the variables being set, however in the end result of "type" it sets it to m and not fm

cpanel_notifications - 1
remote_server - 1

if ($_POST['cpanel_notifications'] == 1){
$type = "m";
}
elseif($_POST['cpanel_notifications'] == 0){
$type = "nm";
}
elseif($_POST['cpanel_notifications'] == 1 && $_POST['remote_server'] == 1){
$type = "fm";
}
elseif($_POST['cpanel_notifications'] == 0 && $_POST['remote_server'] == 0){
$type = "fnm";
}

Result: m

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1  
the first condition is always evaluated to true –  The Sexiest Man in Jamaica Dec 21 '12 at 18:49
    
The first condition is true, so the rest of the else conditions are not checked –  Alon Dec 21 '12 at 18:50
1  
@Alon exactly .... else part doenot make any sense if condition in if is always true –  NullPoiиteя Dec 21 '12 at 18:52
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

what you need todo is reorder your if's

if($_POST['cpanel_notifications'] == 1 && $_POST['remote_server'] == 1){
    $type = "fm";
}
elseif($_POST['cpanel_notifications'] == 0 && $_POST['remote_server'] == 0){
    $type = "fnm";
}
elseif ($_POST['cpanel_notifications'] == 1){
    $type = "m";
}
elseif($_POST['cpanel_notifications'] == 0){
    $type = "nm";
}
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had to set the second elseif to 1 for remote_server but that worked. Thanks –  user1913843 Dec 21 '12 at 19:41
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This is because the first if statement is true. There is no reason to go to any of the elses.

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Just change the conditions order

if ($_POST['cpanel_notifications'] == 1){
    if ($_POST['remote_server'] == 1) { 
        $type = "fm";
    } else {
        $type = "m";
    }
}
elseif($_POST['cpanel_notifications'] == 0){
    if ($_POST['remote_server'] == 0) {
        $type = "fnm";
    } else {
        $type = "nm";
    }
}

or even

if ($_POST['cpanel_notifications'] == 1){
    $type = ($_POST['remote_server'] == 1?"fm":"m");
}
elseif($_POST['cpanel_notifications'] == 0){
    $type = ($_POST['remote_server'] == 0?"fnm":"nm");
}
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I agree with the comments specifying to move your statements with multiple conditions up higher. As a general rule of thumb, you want to put your most specific statements up top and get more generic as you go down the condition list.

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Add more =

if ($_POST['cpanel_notifications'] === 1){
$type = "m";
}
elseif($_POST['cpanel_notifications'] === 0){
$type = "nm";
}
elseif($_POST['cpanel_notifications'] === 1 && $_POST['remote_server'] === 1){
$type = "fm";
}
elseif($_POST['cpanel_notifications'] === 0 && $_POST['remote_server'] === 0){
$type = "fnm";
}

http://php.net/manual/en/language.operators.comparison.php

The above link show you why adding the extra = sign.

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