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For some reason, Visual studio will not step into this code and I cant see the contents of the variable k and p

           for(int k=0; k<6; k++)
            {
                for(int p=0; p<6; p++)
                {
                    if(k=0)
                    {
                        levelToDraw[k][p] = LevelOne[k][p];
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        levelToDraw[k][p] = LevelOne[k-1][p];
                    }
                }
            }
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closed as too localized by Bo Persson, C. A. McCann, EdChum, Bhavik Ambani, François Wahl Dec 22 '12 at 0:23

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Any code before that? –  Jan Dvorak Dec 21 '12 at 19:34
5  
Just a note on the side: if (k = 0) is certainly not what you want. –  Voo Dec 21 '12 at 19:34
1  
@JonathanO how? –  Jan Dvorak Dec 21 '12 at 19:36
1  
That really should have absolutely nothing to do with the problem at hand (also the code with the assignments removed can be stepped through easily in VS2012 for me). –  Voo Dec 21 '12 at 19:37
2  
The compiler noticed it was an infinite loop and dropped it completely –  Jan Dvorak Dec 21 '12 at 19:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

From what I can see

        for(int k=0; k<6; k++)
        {
            for(int p=0; p<6; p++)
            {
                if(k=0)
                {
                    levelToDraw[k][p] = LevelOne[k][p];
                }
                else
                {
                    levelToDraw[k][p] = LevelOne[k-1][p];
                }
            }
        }

is an infinite loop without visible side-effects since k is always reset to zero inside the loop. (note the accidental assignment). Infinite loops without visible side-effects are undefined behavior in C++. This means the compiler can do anything at all. It can throw away the loop, for example, meaning that you can't enter it - and this is likely what happened. Since it's undefined behavior, it could even cause the machine to catch fire.

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Heh, I totally missed the real reason compiler optimised it out :) You are indeed correct –  Zeks Dec 21 '12 at 19:45

You are using assignemnt instead of comparison on this line:

 if(k=0)
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1  
While true that doesn't answer his question in the least. –  Voo Dec 21 '12 at 19:35
3  
Compiler may be optimizing the loop seeing taht nothing really happens and that is why he can't... –  Zeks Dec 21 '12 at 19:36
    
@Zeks something does happen –  Jan Dvorak Dec 21 '12 at 19:36
1  
@Zeks Really? The VS compiler would do such optimizations in debug mode? Sounds like an awfully bad idea, also you'd still be able to step into the loop in any case, since it'd still have to do the assignment of the else branch and that couldn't be optimized away. So it'd have to analyze the code enough to see that it's an infinite loop and then.. is it actually allowed to remove the loop completely then? No idea but I'd hope not. Anyhow, seems like an awfully clever optimization for debug mode. –  Voo Dec 21 '12 at 19:38
    
Voo, I was only theorizing as I am not familiar with VS compiler. It just turned out that my guess was correct. –  Zeks Dec 21 '12 at 19:40

Consider escalating the warning level of C4706. I don't recall the exact compiler switch, but it might be something like /W14706.

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Since you are looping on literals, the compiler may be optimizing the code away. It could be unrolling the loop, for instance.

You can try turning off compiler optimizations to verify.

Removing determinant things like if (k=0)... could certainly help as well.

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i think you missed out one '=' as pointed by Voo

the statement must be if(k==0)

your processor is much faster then your break point analysis. when your code reaches that loop it's already completed before it can check for break point stop. if you stop the code above that loop it will work but on the loop it will not due to the speed of processing. try to add sleep in the loop then you may able to step in loop.

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I think you should ty if(k==0).

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That is not the question –  Jan Dvorak Dec 21 '12 at 19:35

If the compiler was smart (k=0) would be optimized out, and you couldn't step into the if, at least at the instruction level.

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