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I am a C# developer experimenting with JavaScript and I'm trying to get my head around the scope :)

I have the following code which contains an addEventListener in which I want to use a field from my object:

(function(window) {

    function Keyboard() {
        this.keys = {};
    }

    Keyboard.prototype.handle_keydown = function(args) {
        this.keys[args.keyCode] = true;
    }

    Keyboard.prototype.listen = function() {
        window.addEventListener('keydown', this.handle_keydown);
    }

    app.util.keyboard = new Keyboard();

})(window);

I would like to use the keys array in my hander, but understand that I cannot access is by using this, because this is the window in that context (correct?). If I change it to

app.util.keyboard.keys[args.keyCode] = true;

it works, but I'm not sure that's a good way to fix it.

I found this question, which seems rather similar, but Im not sure how I can fit it into my example.

Thanks for your help!

share|improve this question
    
Do you have to add the functions through prototype, can you place them in the Keyboard function instead? –  Musa Dec 21 '12 at 19:52
    
Is there a reason why you're using a self-executing function? –  Foreign Object Dec 21 '12 at 19:53
    
@Musa I would like to call the listen function in a different function than where I create the Keyboard, so I think I have to? –  Raf Dec 21 '12 at 19:53
    
@ClaytonMisura I think I'm doing it to also guarantee my variables scoped to the Keyboard 'class'? –  Raf Dec 21 '12 at 19:55
    
That's true, and that seems like the responsible way to use it, just wondering. –  Foreign Object Dec 21 '12 at 19:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A few things:

  • Most people will suggest something like var self = this because it's fast and easy.

  • But var self = this does not separate the view object entirely from the view logic.

  • The callback handler in this case is actually just a function argument, and has no choice but to be executed as it's evaluated (as objects do in JavaScript). In order to have it execute only when the event fires, wrap the handler in an anonymous function, so that it's evaluated right away, but only executed when and if a keydown event fires (see the code below).

  • Scope is easy to understand: Whatever the execution context is, is also the current execution scope. Your listener was added in a method (called listen) on Keyboard.prototype -- meaning window.addEventListener() will execute in the context of Keyboard.prototype; and so this does (and will) refer to Keyboard.prototype. But because your handler won't be executed until a keydown event is fired on window (remember because we're wrapping it in an anonymous function in order to "control" when and if the code executes), the handler is executing in a different context -- it's executing within the context of what is invoking it; in this case, window.

So what you need to do have your handling object "control" that handler, and stop letting the view control itself. You can do this by having your controller bind itself to its view's handlers. And you can do that using .bind().

In your code, window is a view, and Keyboard.prototype is that view's controller. In MVC patterns, views don't tell themselves what to do when things happen, controllers tell views what to do. So, by assigning a reference to the controller (e.g. using var self = this), you're exposing the controller to the view -- but only for that specific handler for keydown events. This is inconsistent. Instead, always have the same object handle events where the subject is the same (in other words, have controllers for your views).

A solution:

Keyboard.prototype.listen = function() {
    window.addEventListener('keydown', function(e) {
        this.handle_keydown(e);
    }.bind(this), false);
}

A better solution:

Keyboard.prototype.view = window;

Keyboard.prototype.listen = function() {
    this.view.addEventListener('keydown', function(e) {
        this.handle_keydown(e);
    }.bind(this), false);
}

You'll notice that I also passed an argument (e) -- this is a reference to the specific event object. I believe it's cleaner to route the event to the appropriate handler rather than handle the event then and there, because it would enable you to instead write more modular code. Look how ambiguous the second solution is. It could almost apply to anything -- and so it should. :) By choosing to route your events to handlers, you can have this ambiguous handler for keydown events that just comes standard with all future view controllers in your application by way of an abstract base controller class which might look something like...

The best solution:

// define
function addViewController(view) {

    function ViewController() {

        this.handle_keydown = function(args) {
            // handle keydown events
        };

        this.listen = function() {
            this.view.addEventListener('keydown', function(e) {
                this.handle_keydown(e);
            }.bind(this), false);
        };

        this.view = view;
        return this;

    }

    return new ViewController(view);

}

// implement
var keyboard = addViewController(window);
keyboard.listen();

This is called an object "proxy" and will be a native component of ECMAScript 6. I look forward to the day that var self = this is frowned upon.

  • Note: .bind() is compatible with ECMAScript 5+; if you need a solution for older browsers, Mozilla has posted a great alternative to .bind() using functions and .call():

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Function/bind

Edit: Here's what your instantiated keyboard object will look like using this new, modular solution: enter image description here

share|improve this answer
Keyboard.prototype.listen = function() {
    var self = this;
    window.addEventListener('keydown', function(event) {
       self.handle_keydown(event);
       // self is your Keyboard object. You can refer to all your properties from this
    });
}

How this code works:

  1. We are creating variable self, which stores reference to this variable.
  2. The inner function is a closure, hence it has reference to self.
  3. When the closure function is called: this points to the dom object, while self points to keyboard object.
  4. The closure is called with event as a parameter that we pass on to the member function of the keyboard object.
share|improve this answer
    
@Raf: I guess you commented while I was editing –  closure Dec 21 '12 at 19:50
    
Sorry, indeed I was. –  Raf Dec 21 '12 at 19:54
    
@Raf: does it work? –  closure Dec 21 '12 at 19:56
    
no, I dont think so, could you show me the complete code maybe? –  Raf Dec 21 '12 at 19:57
    
@Raf: This is complete code. I am calling your object with the correct handle. The event handler, which is part of your object getting called. Where is the issue? We don't need any other change in your code. –  closure Dec 21 '12 at 20:00

How about

function Keyboard() {
    this.keys = {};
    var self = this;
    this.handle_keydown = function(args) {
        self.keys[args.keyCode] = true;
    }
    this.listen = function() {
        window.addEventListener('keydown', this.handle_keydown);
    }
}
app.util.keyboard = new Keyboard();
share|improve this answer
    
That means I'm not using the prototype way, but I want only one keyboard instance, so maybe thats not a problem? Prototype is also something very new for me :) –  Raf Dec 21 '12 at 19:59

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