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I need to generate the ODIN-1 of a string in Python. The official documentation specifies applying SHA-1 to the input string/identifier, but I'm not sure if I need to perform other operations to it beforehand? Also, is the final output the hex digest of the SHA-1 or something else?

E.g. How can I convert this MAC to ODIN-1 in Python? "74e2f543d2ce"

Thanks in advance!

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up vote 1 down vote accepted
from hashlib import sha1

def odin1(mac_addr):
    """SHA1 hexdigest of hex representaiton of MAC address"""
    to_hash ''.join([i.decode('hex') for i in mac_addr.split(':')])
    return sha1(to_hash).hexdigest()

>>> odin1('1a:2b:3c:4d:5e:6f')
'82a53f1222f8781a5063a773231d4a7ee41bdd6f'

Let's break this down, line by line between the documentation you linked to, and my answer:

// NOTE: iOS returns MAC Address NOT a string, but a 6-byte array. 

// A human readable MAC Address may be represented as the following:

@"1a:2b:3c:4d:5e:6f";
@"1A2B3C4D5E6F";

In python:

>>> '1A'.decode('hex') == '1a'.decode('hex')
True

So we can convert the string given to us into a more agreeable format (that reduces "any ambiguity around punctuation and capitalization"):

>>> mac = "1a:2b:3c:4d:5e:6f".split(':')
>>> hex_mac = [m.decode('hex') for m in mac]
>>> hex_mac
['\x1a', '+', '<', 'M', '^', 'o']

We can treat this list as a string (just the same as if we used a byte array) to get the same result from the SHA1 hash function.

Of course, we can receive MAC addresses this way:

>>> mac = '1A2B3C4D5E6F'
>>> hex_chunks = lambda s: [s[i: i+2] for i in range(0, len(s), 2)]
>>> [m.decode('hex') for m in hex_chunks(mac)]
['\x1a', '+', '<', 'M', '^', 'o']

So it would be up to us to properly unify the input for the single function to operate across all possible forms. Regardless, our function could take either form, the end result is what matters:

>>> sha1(''.join(['\x1a', '+', '<', 'M', '^', 'o'])).hexdigest()

Will produce the correct hash (according to the link you posted).

Hope this helps make my answer clearer.

share|improve this answer
    
If this is correct, the docs are wrong. (Which is certainly possible—this doesn't seem like a completely-thought-through spec that's been picked over by an industry standardization committee or anything.) They clearly say that "The seed should be left unaltered from the format returned by the operating system", "iOS returns MAC Address NOT a string, but a 6-byte array", and "representing it as a raw byte array prevents any ambiguity around punctuation and capitalization". – abarnert Dec 21 '12 at 20:18
1  
I went straight to the example posted on the link, and kept it rigid. How else are you supposed to consume MAC addresses if the input varies? I leave the task of standardizing input up to OP. They can take my snippet and suit it to their needs...they probably just needed help with the hashlib calls. – Droogans Dec 21 '12 at 20:22
    
What do you mean by "how else are you supposed to consume MAC addresses if the input varies?" You get a 6-byte raw byte array from iOS. You pass exactly that raw byte array to SHA1. That's what the docs say to do, and I don't see how that's a problem. – abarnert Dec 21 '12 at 20:28
    
The link posted the MAC address coming in as a colon-delimited string, which, up until 15 minutes ago, was the only way I've ever handled MAC addresses ;). – Droogans Dec 21 '12 at 20:29
    
I don't think you read the link very careful, or maybe even at all. "iOS returns MAC Address NOT a string, but a 6-byte array". It then shows two different ways that "A human readable MAC Address may be represented", one of which is the colon-delimited string, but it then immediately says not to use those, and to instead use a "raw byte array"—in other words, exactly what you got from the OS. The chart also explicitly says the format is "Byte Array". So, where do you see "the link posted the MAC address coming in as a colon-delimited string"? – abarnert Dec 21 '12 at 21:02

I need to generate the ODIN-1 of a string in Python.

No you don't, not according to the docs.

You generate an ODIN-1 of an 802.11 MAC address, ANDROID_ID, or DeviceUniqueID. Some relevant quotes:

The seed should be left unaltered from the format returned by the operating system.

NOTE: iOS returns MAC Address NOT a string, but a 6-byte array" right underneath the chart.

… representing it as a raw byte array prevents any ambiguity around punctuation and capitalization:

And IIRC, ANDROID_ID is a 64-bit integer, neither a MAC nor a string. (I don't know about DeviceUniqueId on Windows Phone.)

So, you probably need to generate the ODIN-1 of a 6-byte array [0x74, 0xe2, 0xf5, 0x43, 0xd2, 0xce], not a 12-character string "74e2f543d2ce". The sample shows how to do that in Objective-C; in Python, it's:

mac = bytes([0x74, 0xe2, 0xf5, 0x43, 0xd2, 0xce])

Or, since your question specifies Android, presumably you don't want the MAC address at all, in any format… but I'll assume that was just a mistaken tag, and you're using iOS, and do want the MAC address.

How do you do that?

Hash Step: Pass the Identifier Seed through the SHA-1 hash function.

In Python, that's:

hash = hashlib.sha1(mac)

The resulting message digest is ODIN-1.

In Python, that's:

digest = hash.hexdigest()

Putting it together:

hashlib.sha1(bytes([0x74, 0xe2, 0xf5, 0x43, 0xd2, 0xce])).hexdigest()

The result is a "40 lowercase character string", just as the docs say it should be:

'10f4ab0775380aceaca5a2733604efa6d6364b08'

Also, if you're looking for clarification on a preliminary spec posted on a wiki page, why would you ask about it at SO instead of posting a comment on that page?

To answer your first specific question:

I'm not sure if I need to perform other operations to it beforehand?

The spec says:

The seed should be left unaltered from the format returned by the operating system.

To answer your second:

Also, is the final output the hex digest of the SHA-1 or something else?

The spec says:

The resulting message digest is ODIN-1.

// The format of this hash should be a 40 lowercase character string:

Meanwhile, there's sample code attached to the project (as you'd expect, given that it's at googlecode)… but it's not that helpful.

The iOS sample is completely missing the relevant code. It's a generic GUI app generated by the wizard, with an added #import "ODIN.h" and textView.text = [ODIN1() lowercaseString]; in the viewDidLoad. But that ODIN.h file, and the corresponding ODIN.m or libODIN.a or whatever doesn't appear to be anywhere. (From a brief glance at the project.pbxproj, there's clearly supposed to be more files, which they apparently just didn't check in.)

The Android sample does have the relevant code, but it clearly violates the spec. It gets the ANDROID_ID as a Unicode string, then encodes it to iso-8859-1, calls SHA-1 on the resulting bytes, and generates a hex digest out of it. The docs explicitly say to use the OS value exactly as returned by the OS; the code Latin-1 encodes it instead.

The Windows sample, on the other hand, does seem to do what the docs say—it gets the DeviceUniqueId as a byte[], and uses it as-is. (However, the code won't actually work, because it's using an obsoleted API call, which throws an exception rather than return a byte[]…)

At this point, I have to ask why you're following this spec in the first place. If you're trying to interoperate with someone else's code, you probably care which of the contradictory ways of interpreting this spec is being used by that code, rather than trying to guess which one the designers intended.

Not to mention that Apple has explicitly told people not to use anything based on the MAC to replace the UDID, and ODIN is something trivially based on the MAC to replace the UDID…

share|improve this answer
    
Whoever downvoted, care to explain why? – abarnert Dec 21 '12 at 20:19
    
I didn't. I did read your answer, which shed some light on details I glossed over in my response. I'll put it back for you. – Droogans Dec 21 '12 at 20:20
    
@Droogans: I'm not accusing you of downvoting; I have no idea who did it. That's the way SO works. I'm asking why someone did so, so I can improve the answer appropriately. – abarnert Dec 21 '12 at 20:22
1  
Downvoted for YAGNI response. OP clearly asks for a string -> ODIN-1 transformation, which is trivial. – Droogans Dec 21 '12 at 23:11
    
@Droogans: You've clearly just downvoting out of spite or hurt pride or something, which is just silly. – abarnert Dec 21 '12 at 23:14

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