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I wrote a script to parse an input text file and output three new text files. The input file has a header line, which is left out of each of the three output files. Each line of the output files gets the first three entries of every input file line, then gets only a portion of the entries in the input line. All files are tab delimited.

My problem is that I keep getting an extra white-space at the end of my output lines. I can see this white-space at the end of the lines of my output files when viewing in VIM. I can't see these extra white-spaces when viewing in excel.

Previously, using an earlier version of my script, I could see extra white-space at the end of my lines using excel, but only by using the "select all" feature. The data displayed in excel was the result of my perl script printing an array, where I coded print $outfile "@array". I learned elsewhere on stackoverflow that typing print "@array" causes a kind of interpolation that adds in white-spaces to my lines. White-spaces resulting from this interpolation were not immediately visible in excel, but could be seen when "select all" was used to highlight the data. So, I changed my code from print $outfile "@array" to print $outfile @array. This change results in output files that still maintain a white-space at the end of each output line, a white-space visible in VIM but not in excel. This is where I am stuck.

Here is my script below. The first part just opens and reads the input file. Then some arrays are declared. Next, a for loop is begun to begin parsing the input file line by line, and pushing appropriate content into appropriate arrays. A substitution is implemented for one array. Again, all files are tab delimited. Finally, the arrays are printed to three outfiles, using the phrasing print $outfile @array and not print $outfile "@array".

Do you see the problem? Thanks!

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict; use warnings;

die "usage: [ imputed genotype.file ]\n" unless @ARGV == 1;

my $imputed = $ARGV[ 0 ];
open ( my $FILE, "<$imputed" );
my @data  = <$FILE>; 

my @ADD = ();
my @DOM = ();
my @IMP = ();

for ( my $i = 1; $i < scalar @data; $i++ ) ### for each line data[i], and use $i = 1 to
                                           ### skip header, 0 to include it output
    {
     my $line = $data[ $i ];
     chomp $line;

     my @entries = split( '\t', $data[ $i ] );

     push( @ADD, "$entries[ 0 ]\t$entries[ 1 ]\t$entries[ 2 ]\t" );
     push( @DOM, "$entries[ 0 ]\t$entries[ 1 ]\t$entries[ 2 ]\t" );
     push( @IMP, "$entries[ 0 ]\t$entries[ 1 ]\t$entries[ 2 ]\t" );

     for ( my $i = 3; $i < scalar @entries - 1 ; $i+=3 ) ### for each entry per line
         {
          push( @ADD, "$entries[ $i ]\t" );
          push( @DOM, "$entries[ $i + 1 ]\t" );

          if ( $entries[ $i + 2 ] eq 'NA' ) ### to replace any occuring "NA"s with blanks
             {
              $entries[ $i + 2 ] =~ s/NA//; 
             }

          push( @IMP, "$entries[ $i + 2 ]\t" );
          }

    push( @ADD, "\n" ); 
    push( @DOM, "\n" );
    push( @IMP, "\n" ); 

   } ### for loop   

open my $Afile, ">$imputed" . "_ADD.txt" or die $!;
print $Afile @ADD; 
close $Afile;

open my $Dfile, ">$imputed" . "_DOM.txt" or die $!;
print $Dfile @DOM;
close $Dfile;

open my $Ifile, ">$imputed" . "_IMP.txt" or die $!;
print $Ifile @IMP;
close $Ifile;
share|improve this question
    
what is the significance of the double vs single quotes? in my review of the use of split, usually single quotes ' ' are used (or / /, depending on context). –  ES55 Dec 21 '12 at 21:24
    
Double quotes interpolate variables within the string. Single quotes do not. –  Andy Lester Dec 21 '12 at 21:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your problem in using \t at the end of the array element. Use function

join( "\t", ...) 

instead.

I mean, just create output array, and then use

print join "\t", @output;

There is untested example:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict; use warnings;

die "usage: [ imputed genotype.file ]\n" unless @ARGV == 1;

open my $Afile, ">$imputed" . "_ADD.txt" or die $!;
open my $Dfile, ">$imputed" . "_DOM.txt" or die $!;
open my $Ifile, ">$imputed" . "_IMP.txt" or die $!;

<>; #skip header
while(<>){ 
      chomp;
      my @entries = split( '\t', $_ );

      my @ADD = ();
      my @DOM = ();
      my @IMP = ();

      push( @ADD, $entries[ 0 ], $entries[ 1 ], $entries[ 2 ]);
      push( @DOM, $entries[ 0 ], $entries[ 1 ], $entries[ 2 ]);
      push( @IMP, $entries[ 0 ], $entries[ 1 ], $entries[ 2 ]);

      for ( my $i = 3; $i < scalar @entries - 1 ; $i+=3 ) { ### for each entry per line
          push( @ADD, $entries[ $i ] );
          push( @DOM, $entries[ $i + 1 ] );

      $entries[ $i + 2 ] =~ s/^NA$//; 

          push( @IMP, $entries[ $i + 2 ] );
      }

      print $Afile join( "\t", @ADD) , "\n"; 
      print $Dfile join( "\t", @DOM) , "\n"; 
      print $Ifile join( "\t", @IMP) , "\n"; 

} ### for loop   

close $Afile;
close $Dfile;
close $Ifile;
share|improve this answer
    
thanks @user1883592, i'll try this. –  ES55 Dec 21 '12 at 20:41
    
can you be a little more explicit? could you guide me where the join command should go? i put it in my final print statements as print $Afile join "\t", @ADD;. But this scrambled things up. –  ES55 Dec 21 '12 at 20:50
    
You can make join( "\t", ...) for every element in the row, and join( "\n", ...) for every row, or just print output row by row with "\n" at the end of the row. –  alex Dec 21 '12 at 20:53
    
i still don't understand. could you embed your idea into the code above? –  ES55 Dec 21 '12 at 21:02
    
push( @ADD, $entries[ $i ] ); –  alex Dec 21 '12 at 21:04
push( @ADD, "$entries[ 0 ]\t$entries[ 1 ]\t$entries[ 2 ]\t" );

These lines always add a tab at the end, which is probably what you're seeing. Also, consider using a join and an array slice instead of string interpolation, like:

push( @ADD, join( "\t", @entries[0..2] ) );
share|improve this answer
    
thanks @frezik, let me look up those ideas and try them. –  ES55 Dec 21 '12 at 20:41
    
i think i see that working for the first three elements that go into my arrays. how would you use the join in the second for loop, the one embedded in the first loop? –  ES55 Dec 21 '12 at 21:13
    
hey, @frezik, shouldn't that be join( '\t' instead of join( "\t" ? –  ES55 Dec 21 '12 at 21:33
    
@eric - frezik is correct, else you'd be joining using the string literal '\t' and not a tab character. –  Kenosis Dec 21 '12 at 21:36
    
hi @kenosis, but I have been using '\t' and it has been tab delimiting my entries for me. My data are numeric, and so there are no t's to split with. Plus, most examples of join I see online use single quotes. –  ES55 Dec 21 '12 at 21:38

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