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Title says it all, why can't I use a windowed function in a where clause in SQL Server?

This query makes perfect sense:

select id, sales_person_id, product_type, product_id, sale_amount
from Sales_Log
where 1 = row_number() over(partition by sales_person_id, product_type, product_id order by sale_amount desc)

But it doesn't work. Is there a better way than a CTE/Subquery?

EDIT

For what its worth this is the query with a CTE:

with Best_Sales as (
    select id, sales_person_id, product_type, product_id, sale_amount, row_number() over (partition by sales_person_id, product_type, product_id order by sales_amount desc) rank
    from Sales_log
)
select id, sales_person_id, product_type, product_id, sale_amount
from Best_Sales
where rank = 1

EDIT

+1 for the answers showing with a subquery, but really I'm looking for the reasoning behind not being able to use windowing functions in where clauses.

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1  
Windowing functions are part of the non-relational layer (because relational theory doesn't deal with ordered data); thus they are evaluated after everything else. –  Lord Peter Dec 21 '12 at 21:40
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5 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

really I'm looking for the reasoning behind not being able to use windowing functions in where clauses.

The reason that they are not allowed in the WHERE clause is that it would create ambiguity. Stealing Itzik Ben Gan's example from High-Performance T-SQL Using Window Functions (p.25)

Suppose your table was

CREATE TABLE T1
(
col1 CHAR(1) PRIMARY KEY
)

INSERT INTO T1 VALUES('A'),('B'),('C'),('D'),('E'),('F')

And your query

SELECT col1
FROM T1
WHERE ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY col1) <= 3
AND col1 > 'B'

What would be the right result? Would you expect that the col1 > 'B' predicate ran before or after the row numbering?

The ROW_NUMBER is evaluated at the time of the SELECT on the result set remaining after all the WHERE/HAVING clauses have been dealt with.

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Thanks, it was driving me nuts, I couldn't figure it out. –  Christopher Pfohl Dec 21 '12 at 21:32
    
Is this is the same reason they are not allowed in the GROUP BY clause?? –  Mahmoud Gamal Jan 1 '13 at 14:52
    
@MahmoudGamal The window operated on in the group by would need to be different than the window used in the select as that is on the result after grouping and having. Suppose you could define it as the rows logically present before the group by but Just would be quite confusing to allow that I think. –  Martin Smith Jan 1 '13 at 15:25
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There is no need for CTE, just use the windowing function in a subquery:

select id, sales_person_id, product_type, product_id, sale_amount
from
(
  select id, sales_person_id, product_type, product_id, sale_amount,
    row_number() over(partition by sales_person_id, product_type, product_id order by sale_amount desc) rn
  from Sales_Log
) sl
where rn = 1

Edit, moving my comment to the answer.

Windowing functions are not performed until the data is actually selected which is after the WHERE clause. So if you try to use a row_number in a WHERE clause the value is not yet assigned.

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+1 for answering the question, but not quite what I was looking for...shall I ask again, correctly this time? –  Christopher Pfohl Dec 21 '12 at 21:19
1  
@ChristopherPfohl based on my understanding the row_number is not assigned until the records are selected so you cannot have it in the WHERE clause because the value does not exist yet. –  bluefeet Dec 21 '12 at 21:20
    
ahh... thanks. makes sense, but it's still a pity. –  Christopher Pfohl Dec 21 '12 at 21:21
    
Apologies for giving and taking away, but the answer below is even closer to the answer I was looking for. –  Christopher Pfohl Dec 21 '12 at 21:31
1  
@ChristopherPfohl it is basically the same thing I said in my comment, but you get to decide what answer to accept. :) –  bluefeet Dec 21 '12 at 21:36
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You don't necessarily need to use a CTE, you can query the result set after using row_number()

select row, id, sales_person_id, product_type, product_id, sale_amount
from (
    select
        row_number() over(partition by sales_person_id, 
            product_type, product_id order by sale_amount desc) AS row,
        id, sales_person_id, product_type, product_id, sale_amount
    from Sales_Log 
    ) a
where row = 1
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+1 for answering the question, but not quite what I was looking for...shall I ask again, correctly this time? –  Christopher Pfohl Dec 21 '12 at 21:20
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Yes unfortunately when you do a windowed function SQL gets mad at you even if your where predicate is legitimate. You make a cte or nested select having the value in your select statement, then reference your CTE or nested select with that value later. Simple example that should be self explanatory. If you really HATE cte's for some performance issue on doing a large data set you can always drop to temp table or table variable.

declare @Person table ( PersonID int identity, PersonName varchar(8));

insert into @Person values ('Brett'),('John');

declare @Orders table ( OrderID int identity, PersonID int, OrderName varchar(8));

insert into @Orders values (1, 'Hat'),(1,'Shirt'),(1, 'Shoes'),(2,'Shirt'),(2, 'Shoes');

--Select
--  p.PersonName
--, o.OrderName
--, row_number() over(partition by o.PersonID order by o.OrderID)
--from @Person p 
--  join @Orders o on p.PersonID = o.PersonID
--where row_number() over(partition by o.PersonID order by o.orderID) = 2

-- yields:
--Msg 4108, Level 15, State 1, Line 15
--Windowed functions can only appear in the SELECT or ORDER BY clauses.
;

with a as 
    (
    Select
    p.PersonName
,   o.OrderName
,   row_number() over(partition by o.PersonID order by o.OrderID) as rnk
from @Person p 
    join @Orders o on p.PersonID = o.PersonID
    )
select *
from a 
where rnk >= 2 -- only orders after the first one.
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Finally, there's the old-fashioned, pre-SQL Server 2005 way, with a correlated subquery:

select *
from   Sales_Log sl
where  sl.id = (
    Select Top 1 id
    from   Sales_Log sl2
    where  sales_person_id = sl.sales_person_id
       and product_type = sl.product_type
       and product_id = sl.product_id
    order by sale_amount desc
)

I give you this for completeness, merely.

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