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This is my header file, auto vs static.h

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>

void IncrementAndPrint()
{
    using namespace std;
    int nValue = 1; // automatic duration by default
    ++nValue;
    cout << nValue << endl;
} // nValue is destroyed here

void print_auto()
{
    IncrementAndPrint();
    IncrementAndPrint();
    IncrementAndPrint();
}

void IncrementAndPrint()
{
    using namespace std;
    static int s_nValue = 1; // fixed duration
    ++s_nValue;
    cout << s_nValue << endl;
} // s_nValue is not destroyed here, but becomes inaccessible

void print_static()
{
    IncrementAndPrint();
    IncrementAndPrint();
    IncrementAndPrint();
}

And this is my main file, namearray.cpp

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include "auto vs static.h"
using namespace std;

    int main(); // changing this to "int main()" (get rid of ;) solves error 5. 
    {
    print_static();
    print_auto();
    cin.get();
    return 0;
    }

I'm trying to print (cout) 2 2 2 2 3 4

Errors:

Errors

I feel that my mistake is just using void in the header file. How can I change the header file so that my code will work?

Reference: code from learncpp

share|improve this question
    
You have the same prototype declared twice for IncrementAndPrint(), the fact that the body of the function changes does not matter. The error says it: function "already has a body". – fge Dec 21 '12 at 21:13
    
I don't know exactly, but maybe this is because you have forgotten to declare a function prototype for IncrementAndPrint() before defining it. Ie, you have no void IncrementAndPrint(); prior to declaring the function body. That is just a guess, though, I don't use your compiler chain but GCC. – fge Dec 21 '12 at 21:20
    
To get rid of error 5) I just had to get rid of ; after int main() – user1908190 Dec 21 '12 at 21:27
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Unlike variables, you cannot give a new value to a function. So here is what the compiler thinks:

"Oh, OK, when you say IncrementAndPrint, what you mean is this function here at the top of the file".

Then it sees print_auto and learns what that means. But then you try to tell it that IncrementAndPrint actually means this other function, and the compiler gets confused. "But you already told me what IncrementAndPrint means!", complains the compiler.

This contrasts with variables (in some way), where you can say:

int x = 0;
x = 6;

The compiler understands that at one point, x has the value 0, but then you say "x is different now, it means 6.". However, you cannot say:

int x = 0;
int x = 6;

Because when you include a type before a variable name, you are defining a new variable. If you do not include a type, you are just assigning to an old one.

You will have to give IncrementAndPrint a different name.

Alternatively, you could have them take different arguments, for instance, void IncrementAndPrint(int x); vs. void IncrementAndPrint(double y);. I don't recommend that here because you don't need the argument.

Another possibility is to use a namespace. It would look something like this:

namespace automatic_variables {

void IncrementAndPrint() {
    // automatic variable version
}
void print() {
    // automatic version
}
}
namespace static_variables {

void IncrementAndPrint() {
    // static variable version
}
void print() {
    // static version
}
}
share|improve this answer

You cannot declare two functions with the same name and parameters.

 void IncrementAndPrint()
share|improve this answer
1  
... unless they have different parameters – Zeks Dec 21 '12 at 21:16
    
With the same name and the same parameters. – Matteo Italia Dec 21 '12 at 21:16
    
signature is indeed better – log0 Dec 21 '12 at 21:17
    
Well, the signature includes the return type, which is not relevant for overloading. – Matteo Italia Dec 21 '12 at 21:18
    
This answer is technically correct, but I think it's only marginally helpful for a new person. The asker most likely doesn't know what a "signature" means, and may not even think that they are declaring two functions. It looks to me like they were trying to redefine IncrementAndPrint later on. – David Stone Dec 21 '12 at 21:23

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