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Can anyone please explain me in which scenario we use static initial block? thanks in advance.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use it as a "constructor" for static data in your class. For example, a common situation might be setting up a list of special words:

private static final Set<String> special = new HashSet<String>();
static {
    special.add("Java");
    special.add("C++");
    ...
}

These can then be used later to check if a string matches something interesting.

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The most common scenario is loading some resources on class load, for example loading library for JNI

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And another common one is when some of the code you need to use to create your statics throw exceptions.

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Another example is java.lang.Object

public class Object {

    private static native void registerNatives();
    static {
        registerNatives();
    }
...
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I use them all the time to initialize lists and maps.

List<String> myList = new ArrayList<String>(){{
    add("blah");
    add("blah2");
}};
for(String s : myList){
    System.out.println(s);
}
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1  
He was asking about static initializers. That's an example of an instance (non-static) initializer. –  Scott Stanchfield Dec 21 '12 at 21:27
    
Whoops you're right. Must have read it too quick. –  Matt Klooster Dec 21 '12 at 21:29
1  
(It is a good example of an instance initializer though, which is useful for setup in anonymous inner classes as you demonstrated) –  Scott Stanchfield Dec 21 '12 at 21:31
    
Just be aware that that actually creates a subclass of ArrayList! –  Scott Stanchfield Dec 21 '12 at 21:49
    
I know. It's not the most memory efficient thing either from what I've heard. –  Matt Klooster Dec 21 '12 at 22:07

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