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As the topic indicates above, I'm wondering if there's a good example of a clean and efficient way to handle pointers as passed in function parms when processing the data sequentially. What I have is something like:

function myfunc(inptr: pointer; inptrsize: longint): boolean;
   var
     inproc: pointer;
     i: integer;
   begin
     inproc := inptr;
     for i := 1 to inptrsize do
       begin
         // do stuff against byte data here.
         inc(longint(inproc), 1);
       end;
   end;

The idea is that instead of finite pieces of data, I want it to be able to process whatever is pushed its way, no matter the size.

Now when it comes to processing the data, I've figured out a couple of ways to do it successfully.

  1. Assign the parm pointers to identical temporary pointers, then use those to access each piece of data, incrementing them to move on. This method is quickest, but not very clean looking with all the pointer increments spread all over the code. (this is what I'm talking about above)
  2. Assign the parm pointers to a pointer representing a big array value and then incremently process that using standard table logic. Much cleaner, but about 500 ms slower than #1.

Is there another way to efficiently handle processing pointers in this way, or is there some method I'm missing that will both be clean and not time inefficient?

share|improve this question
    
When you say "500 ms slower than #1", that is meaningless since you did not say how long #1 took to run. You also did not say what happens inside the loop. The more that happens inside the loop, the less significant is the looping technique. –  David Heffernan Dec 22 '12 at 11:32
    
True, I didn't notice that. #1 was about 800ms in my test, so "500 ms slower than #1" is not insignificant. –  Glenn1234 Dec 23 '12 at 4:51
    
FWIW, I threw a version of the code involved here , since it seems that place was much more suited to the issue. But since it's a ghost town I thought I'd link back here. But like was said there, the output buffer assign is about 20% of the total code time. –  Glenn1234 Jan 2 '13 at 16:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Your code here is basically fine. I would always choose to increment a pointer than cast to a fake array.

But you should not cast to an integer. That is semantically wrong and you'll pay the penalty anytime you compile on a platform that has pointer size different from your integer size. Always use a pointer to an element of the right size. In this case a pointer to byte.

function MyFunc(Data: PByte; Length: Integer): Boolean;
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  for i := 1 to Length do
  begin
    // do stuff against byte data here.
    inc(Data);
  end;
end;

Unless the compiler is having a really bad day, you won't find it easy to get better performing code than this. What's more, I think this style is actually rather clear and easy to understand. Most of the clarity gain comes in avoiding the need to cast. Always strive to remove casts from your code.

If you want to allow any pointer type to be passed then you can write it like this:

function MyFunc(P: Pointer; Length: Integer): Boolean;
var
  i: Integer;
  Data: PByte;
begin
  Data := P;
  for i := 1 to Length do
  begin
    // do stuff against byte data here.
    inc(Data);
  end;
end;

Or if you want to avoid pointers in the interface, then use an untyped const parameter.

function MyFunc(const Buffer; Length: Integer): Boolean;
var
  i: Integer;
  Data: PByte;
begin
  Data := PByte(@Buffer);
  for i := 1 to Length do
  begin
    // do stuff against byte data here.
    inc(Data);
  end;
end;

Use a var parameter if you need to modify the buffer.

share|improve this answer
    
The good thing is also if you have other types like PChar,PInteger etc, the loop is the same. Just change the function header. –  LU RD Dec 21 '12 at 21:49
    
Thanks for the advice on casting the pointers. I must have tried to figure it out myself once upon a time and ended up doing that as a habit because the compiler complained otherwise. But wouldn't using a typed pointer in the function parm defeat the idea of using the code to write once/run against anything? –  Glenn1234 Dec 21 '12 at 23:56
    
There are lots of different ways to slice it. Untyped pointer param and then typed PByte local var. Or a const untyped parameter. –  David Heffernan Dec 22 '12 at 8:31
    
I added some examples. –  David Heffernan Dec 22 '12 at 8:48
1  
@alzaimar Try measuring the performance. When I did I found that neither of your versions are faster than the code in my answer. Measurement is critical to judging performance. See my pastebin here: pastebin.com/keDH7vvT –  David Heffernan Dec 22 '12 at 10:53

I have a different opinion: For sake of readability I would use an array. Pascal was not designed to be able to access memory directly. Original pascal did not even have pointer arithmetic.

This is how I would use an array:

function MyFunc(P: Pointer; Length: Integer): Boolean;
var
  ArrayPtr : PByteArray Absolute P;
  I : Integer;

begin
  For I := 0 to Length-1 do 
    // do stuff against ArrayPtr^[I]
end;

But if performance matters, I would write it like this

function MyFunc(P: Pointer; Length: Integer): Boolean;
var
  EndOfMemoryBlock: PByte;

begin
  EndOfMemoryBlock := PByte(Int_Ptr(Data)+Length);
  While P<EndOfMemoryBlock Do begin
    // do stuff against byte data here.
    inc(P);
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
1  
When it comes to readability it does boil down to taste. We all have our own preferences and I don't honestly believe one is better than another. As for performance, your first option, using casts to fake arrays, is slower. The second option, using pointer arithmetic, is faster, but is identical in speed to the code in my answer. That is the case on x86. On x64 all three options (your two, plus mine) have the same runtime. –  David Heffernan Dec 22 '12 at 10:54
    
Of course it's a matter of taste, that's why I started my words with 'opinion' and uses terms like 'I would write' etc. Regarding performance I doubt that incrementing a pointer plus a counter is as fast as incrementing a pointer alone. –  alzaimar Dec 22 '12 at 12:12
    
Yeah, agreed regarding taste and opinion. However, there's no need for doubt. You can simply run the various options and time them. Like I did. You can do so too. From my paste bin: pastebin.com/keDH7vvT –  David Heffernan Dec 22 '12 at 12:14
    
David, I was just too lazy to try it out, to be honest with you. But I will repeat it now. Thanks for the past bin. ;-p –  alzaimar Dec 22 '12 at 12:28
    
I just tested it. If you replace the '<' with a '<>' in my while-condition it runs fastest, but only by a fraction of time. –  alzaimar Dec 22 '12 at 12:50

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