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So, I am trying to store sessions in a mysql db. Everything seems to be going okay, in that it'll write data to the session table etc. But, I just noticed that I can write out a sessions data despite the fact my read method is empty. So, if you look at the code, the final echo statement would write "value" -- even though there is zero logic defined. Any ideas? Thanks!

class SessionManagement{

    private $_hostname;
    private $_username;
    private $_password;
    private $_database;
    private $_timeout;

    public function __construct() {
        $CI =& get_instance();
        $CI->load->database();

        $this->_hostname = $CI->db->hostname;
        $this->_username = $CI->db->username;
        $this->_password = $CI->db->password;
        $this->_database = $CI->db->database;       
        $this->_timeout  = 60 * 60 * 10;    
    }

    public function _open()
    {
        return TRUE;
    }

    public function _close()
    {
        return TRUE;
    } 

    public function _read($id)
    {
                mysql_connect($this->_hostname, $this->_username, $this->_password);
    mysql_select_db($this->_database);

    $id = mysql_real_escape_string($id);

    $sql = "SELECT session_data
            FROM   sessions
            WHERE  session_id = '$id'";

    if ($result = mysql_query($sql)) {
        if (mysql_num_rows($result)) {
            $record = mysql_fetch_assoc($result);

            return $record['session_data'];
        }
    }

    return '';  
    }

    public function _write($id, $data)
    {

        mysql_connect($this->_hostname, $this->_username, $this->_password);
        mysql_select_db($this->_database);

        $id = mysql_real_escape_string($id);
        $data = mysql_real_escape_string(base64_encode(serialize(strip_tags($data))));  
        $access = time() + $this->_timeout;

        $sql = "REPLACE INTO session (session_id, session_data, session_expires) VALUES('$id','$data', $access)";

        return mysql_query($sql);
    }
    public function _gc($max)
    {
        return TRUE;
    }

    public function _destroy($id)
    {
        mysql_connect($this->_hostname, $this->_username, $this->_password);
        mysql_select_db($this->_database);

        $id = mysql_real_escape_string($id);

        $sql = "DELETE
                FROM   session
                WHERE  session_id = '$id'";

        return mysql_query($sql);
    }
}

ini_set("session.save_handler", "user");

session_name("test");
session_set_cookie_params(0, '/', '.test.com');

$s = new SessionManagement();

session_set_save_handler(
        array($s, '_open'),
        array($s, '_close'),
        array($s, '_read'),
        array($s, '_write'),
        array($s, '_destroy'),
        array($s, '_gc')
); 

session_start();

$_SESSION['test'] = "value";

ECHO $_SESSION['test'];
share|improve this question
    
mysql_query is a deprecated interface and will be removed from PHP in future versions. Unless you have a very good reason you should not be using it in new applications. –  tadman Dec 21 '12 at 21:36
    
Why is this surprising? The read function is not used to write. –  Wolfgang Stengel Dec 21 '12 at 21:40
    
Hey guys, thanks for the replies and I'll remove the use of mysql_query. It doesn't seem like it's working properly as(for test purposes) I have no method body for my read method, yet when I write out the session I can see its value. To me, this indicates that it isn't getting the value from the database, as it should. –  Dan Dec 22 '12 at 18:03
    
ini_set("session.save_handler", "user"); ? This defaults to 'files'. Try to remove this line and just use the session_set_save_handler to register your session handler –  Andreas Dec 24 '12 at 12:21

3 Answers 3

You're using Codeigniter. It has the feature to store sessions into the datbase already built in.

Just remove your code that does not work and use the feature of Codeigniter instead. You only need to configure it.


Apart from that, if you really want to "stay with yours", there are multiple issues with your code. They are easy to spot if you follow the following points:

  1. Read about each callback function for the session save handler. Especially which data they receive and in which format (not doing so leads to at least one error that is able to trigger the behavior that you describe as "not working").
  2. Do error logging. Having a problem with the save handler that leads to giving errors might leave them unseen because output to the browser is not possible any longer. This requires you to log errors to file. This is very important when you troubleshoot with a session savehandler.
  3. Move the database interaction code out of the way. This allows you also to provide better error information in case database interaction fails (not doing so hides at least one error that is able to result in the behavior that you describe as "not working").
  4. Remove code that is not needed. I mean, it's not needed. Having code that is not needed can include errors that is resulting into the "not working" scenario you have here. So you are hindering yourself from getting things done for no reason. One example: ini_set("session.save_handler", "user"); - as long as you have no clue what you do, don't do it. There is no predefined savehandler called user in PHP, nor are you defining that one.

And that is basically it. So I could spot two real errors causing this, the other steps are necessary so you can deal with future problems:

  1. Ensure you always related to the same database table. For example, if you write into table MY_SESSIONS and read from table SESSIONS, this will never work.
  2. Ensure that the data you give back to PHP is compatible to the data it expects. For example, if you store the data Base64 encoded into the database and give it back to PHP Base64 encoded, there is nothing PHP can do with that data.

Other potential problems which are not visible from your code:

  1. The database schema you have is not fitting for the data you store in there (you have not provided the table schema so it can not be said whether or not this causes you problems).
  2. The database link identifier might change because codeigniter itself is creating a database connection. This could lead to potential side-effects. Explicitly providing the link identifier for the database connection helps for a relaxed sleep.
  3. Errors in SQL queries that got unnoticed because the error handling for the database parts is missing.

Example code:

ob_start();

session_name("test");
session_set_cookie_params(0, '/', '.test.com');

$s = new SessionManagement();
$s->register();

session_start();

ECHO $_SESSION['test'], "\n"; # value

Refactored SessionManagement class:

class SessionManagement
{
    private $_timeout;
    private $_db;

    public function __construct() {

        $CI =& get_instance();
        $CI->load->database();

        $this->_db = new LegacyMysqlDatabase(
            $CI->db->hostname, $CI->db->username, $CI->db->password, $CI->db->database
        );

        $this->_timeout = 60 * 60 * 10;
    }

    public function _open() {

        return TRUE;
    }

    public function _close() {

        return TRUE;
    }

    public function _read($session_id) {

        $db         = $this->_db;
        $session_id = $db->escape($session_id);
        $sql        = "SELECT session_data
            FROM   SESSION
            WHERE  session_id = '$session_id'";

        if (!($result = $db->query($sql)) || !$result->getNumberOfRows()) {
            return '';
        }

        $record = $result->fetchAssoc();
        return $record['session_data'];
    }

    public function _write($session_id, $session_data) {

        $db              = $this->_db;
        $session_id      = $db->escape($session_id);
        $session_data    = $db->escape($session_data);
        $session_expires = time() + $this->_timeout;

        $sql = "REPLACE INTO SESSION (session_id,    session_data,    session_expires)
                             VALUES  ('$session_id', '$session_data', $session_expires)";

        return (bool)$db->query($sql); // cast to bool because PHP would cast to int
    }

    public function _gc($max) {

        return TRUE;
    }

    public function _destroy($id) {

        $db         = $this->_db;
        $session_id = $db->escape($id);
        $sql        = "DELETE
                FROM   SESSION
                WHERE  session_id = '$id'";

        return $db->query($sql);
    }

    public function register() {

        $registered = session_set_save_handler(
            array($this, '_open'),
            array($this, '_close'),
            array($this, '_read'),
            array($this, '_write'),
            array($this, '_destroy'),
            array($this, '_gc')
        );
        if (!$registered) {
            throw new Exception('Can not register session savehandler.');
        }
    }
}

Database interaction code with error handling:

class LegacyMysqlDatabase
{
    private $_hostname;
    private $_username;
    private $_password;
    private $_database;

    private $_link;
    private $_initError = false;

    public function __construct($hostname, $username, $password, $database) {

        $this->_hostname = $hostname;
        $this->_username = $username;
        $this->_password = $password;
        $this->_database = $database;
    }

    public function query($sql) {

        $link   = $this->getLink();
        $result = mysql_query($sql, $link);
        if ($result === false) {
            trigger_error(sprintf('Query "%s" failed: #%d: %s', $sql, mysql_errno($link), mysql_error($link)));
            throw new Exception('Failed to query Mysql database.');
        }
        return new LegacyMysqlResult($result);
    }

    public function escape($string) {

        return mysql_real_escape_string($string, $this->getLink());
    }

    private function getLink() {

        if ($this->_initError) {
            throw new Exception('Failed to initialize the database.');
        }

        if ($this->_link === null) {
            $this->_initError = true;
            $result           = mysql_connect($this->_hostname, $this->_username, $this->_password);
            if (!$result) {
                throw new Exception('Can not connect to Mysql database.');
            }
            $this->_link = $result;
            $selected    = mysql_select_db($this->_database, $this->_link);
            if (!$selected) {
                trigger_error(sprintf('Can not select Mysql database "%s": #%d: %s', $this->_database, mysql_errno($result), mysql_error($result)));
                throw new Exception(sprintf('Can not select Mysql database "%"', $this->_database));
            }
            $this->_initError = false;
        }
        return $this->_link;
    }
}

class LegacyMysqlResult
{

    private $_result;

    public function __construct($result) {

        $this->_result = $result;
    }

    public function getNumberOfRows() {

        return mysql_num_rows($this->_result);
    }

    public function fetchAssoc() {

        return mysql_fetch_assoc($this->_result);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Actually the _write function handler is not executed until after the output stream is closed.

Thus your $_SESSION['test'] = "value"; is just an array So it prints the value,

Details about this was HERE

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, I am trying to access the session value on another subdomain and the $_SESSION array is empty, despite the fact I can see that the session manager is using the correct session id and returning the encrypted session data. –  Dan Dec 24 '12 at 19:03
    
from your question the read method returns always empty string and thus there will be no output, and if you used correct session id and doesn't returning means may be you've done anything wrong in that.. –  senK Dec 25 '12 at 5:15
    
Hey, thanks for responding. I've since reimplemented the write method and things seem to be working fine, on the one domain. The session variable is always empty when I got to a subdomain. Although, I can see that the correct session id from the database is there and it's reading out the correct data. –  Dan Dec 25 '12 at 14:08
    
Hope you got the concept.. –  senK Dec 25 '12 at 15:20
    
Well, I still don't understand why when I transfer to a subdomain $_SESSION is an empty array but the read method returns the appropriate session data. I'll edit the write method in the code, so you can see what the problem-o is. –  Dan Dec 25 '12 at 17:59

I'm not sure I understand your question.. Basically your script is only three lines:

session_start();

$_SESSION['test'] = "value";

ECHO $_SESSION['test'];

The point of session management is that you don't have to save values in a database as long as the session is active (in most browsers until you close the browser).

You create a session, php will send a session cookie to your browser, if the cookie is accepted you can output $_SESSION['test'] on any page as long as the session is active.

Edit: Look at http://php.net/manual/de/function.session-start.php

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, thanks for the reply. I need to store sessions in a database as there are many instances running the app behind a load balancer. So, I'm changing how php sessions are written and read. The read method had no method implementation, yet I can write out the session data... –  Dan Dec 22 '12 at 18:06

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