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I think this command below, will checkout a remote branch name 'branch_name' and create a local branch for me called 'branch_name'.

'git checkout -b branch_name "`git remote`"/branch_name'

My question is

  • how can I run this despite I already has a branch name 'branch_name', can I ask git it checkout to branch_name even (if that branch already exist)?

  • when I do 'git branch -a', I don't see a branch 'remote/branch_name', I only see a branch 'remotes/ser-git/branch_name'. How can git find the right remove branch from 'git remtoe'/branch_name?

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I would recommend using a git repo viewer to do advance checking out of branches. Something like smartgit syntevo.com/smartgit/index.html. –  Whitecat Dec 21 '12 at 21:37

1 Answer 1

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how can I run this despite I already has a branch name 'branch_name', can I ask git it checkout to branch_name even (if that branch already exist)?

Use -B option instead of -b

when I do 'git branch -a', I don't see a branch 'remote/branch_name', I only see a branch 'remotes/ser-git/branch_name'. How can git find the right remove branch from 'git remtoe'/branch_name?

git resolves reference name in the following order:

  1. If $GIT_DIR/<name> exists, that is what you mean (this is usually useful only for HEAD, FETCH_HEAD, ORIG_HEAD, MERGE_HEAD and CHERRY_PICK_HEAD);
  2. otherwise, refs/<name> if it exists;
  3. otherwise, refs/tags/<refname> if it exists;
  4. otherwise, refs/heads/<name> if it exists;
  5. otherwise, refs/remotes/<name> if it exists; <- this is your case
  6. otherwise, refs/remotes/<name>/HEAD if it exists.

It means that if you have local branch ser-git/branch_name, it will be preferred by git instead of remote branch.

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