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I am using gem devise. Devise extends application controller and adds user managment to rails application.

When I look inside the gem I can see following line

class Devise::SessionsController < ApplicationController

I am trying to change this since I want Devise controller to inherit from my custom controller named AdminController. Reason for this is I have whole web application finished and I do not want admin part of the page to use my application layout, css, js ...

How can I dynamically change base class of controller? Or dynamically tell controller to use admin.html.erb layout instead of application.html.erb layout.

When I say "dynamicly" I mean monkey patch it, thank you.

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You can specify layout in controller guides.rubyonrails.org/layouts_and_rendering.html I am looking for a way to monkey patch Devise::SessionsController with custom layout. –  Haris Krajina Dec 21 '12 at 22:21
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3 Answers

Devise is a rails engine. I think that the best way to make a admin section of you site is to make a rails engine. Or better still use rails_admin or activeadmin. They are both rails engines There is a railscast about rails engines

I don't know the inner works of you app, but if you add

layout "admin"

to your AdminController and add a custom admin layout to the view/layouts folder with

 <%= stylesheet_link_tag 'admin' %>
 <%= javascript_include_tag "admin"%>

the AdminController views will use the admin stylesheet and javascript

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These gems are very nice thank you, still I am just calling that part of site "admin" real reason I need devise is user management. I do not think that devise has it's own application controller since it uses my application controller. I want devise page to use layout different from one defined in application layout. –  Haris Krajina Dec 21 '12 at 22:16
    
Perhaps CanCan could help you out. Updating my answer –  Andreas Lyngstad Dec 21 '12 at 22:23
    
Sorry, devise does not have it's own application controller –  Andreas Lyngstad Dec 21 '12 at 22:30
    
Thanks for help Andreas, I figured it out. If you want to specify special logic to assigning layouts see above. We live and learn, hope day comes when I know it all :) –  Haris Krajina Dec 21 '12 at 22:33
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

This solved my problem, if namespace of controller is Devise use admin layout.

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  protect_from_forgery

  layout :determine_layout

  def determine_layout
    module_name = self.class.to_s.split("::").first
    return (module_name.eql?("Devise") ? "admin" : "application")
  end
end
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1  
Hey. That's really cool! We live and we learn, and that's what makes it fun, hope the day when I know it all never comes ; ) –  Andreas Lyngstad Dec 21 '12 at 22:38
    
Agreed! hehe good one for a tweet –  Haris Krajina Dec 21 '12 at 23:03
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If you just need to change the layout, I think you should be able to do it by re-opening the controller class. At the bottom of your initializers/devise.rb (underneath the config section at the top level, you could write:

Devise::SessionsController.layout :admin

I've not tried this, but in theory it should work since layout is just a class method on ActionController.base.

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Tried it, it said there is not 'layout=' method. –  Haris Krajina Dec 21 '12 at 23:51
    
@Dolphin You've put an '=' sign in where one shouldn't be. You should be able to do the above (i.e. layout :admin, not layout = :admin). –  Paul Russell Dec 22 '12 at 0:49
    
Did not get chance to try it but probably you are right. –  Haris Krajina Dec 27 '12 at 11:47
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