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That does this calculation below

address = '174.36.207.186'

( o1, o2, o3, o4 ) = address.split('.')

integer_ip =   ( 16777216 * o1 )
             + (    65536 * o2 )
             + (      256 * o3 )
             +              o4
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possible duplicate of How to convert an IPv4 address into a integer in C#? –  Dan Abramov Dec 21 '12 at 22:12
    
Look here –  Jordão Dec 21 '12 at 22:13
    
i checked both place and did not find working solution. first of all it has to be int 64 not 32 –  MonsterMMORPG Dec 21 '12 at 22:13
    
Int32 would not support addresses larger than 127.255.255.255; however, UInt32 would support the full IPv4 range. Int64 would be overkill. –  Douglas Dec 21 '12 at 22:21
    
I think that the solution from @Douglas is far better than the duplicate signaled. Let this question and its answer open please –  Steve Dec 21 '12 at 22:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
string s = "174.36.207.186";

uint i = s.Split('.')
          .Select(uint.Parse)
          .Aggregate((a, b) => a * 256 + b);
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nicely working thanks –  MonsterMMORPG Dec 21 '12 at 22:17
    
+1 really good answer –  Steve Dec 21 '12 at 22:41

You can parse the numbers into a byte array, then use BitConverter.ToInt32 to put them together into an int:

byte[] parts = address.Split('.').Select(Byte.Parse).ToArray();
if (BitConverter.IsLittleEndian) {
  Array.Reverse(parts);
}
int ip = BitConverter.ToInt32(parts, 0);
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1  
Int32 only supports addresses up to 127.255.255.255. –  Douglas Dec 21 '12 at 22:22
    
@Douglas: Not at all. Addresses higher than that are represented as negative int values. You can cast the int it to uint if you like that better. –  Guffa Dec 21 '12 at 23:39
    
Fair point. I should have said that the intent is less clear with negative numbers. For example, any assumed ordering would be broken; 127.0.0.0 < 128.0.0.0 would evaluate as false using Int32 representations. –  Douglas Dec 22 '12 at 10:10

You can parse the string to an IPAddress instance and then access the Address Property:

long result = IPAddress.Parse("174.36.207.186").Address;

Note that this will yield a compiler warning (obsolete property), because it doesn't work with IPv6.

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not returnign same value for example ip : 1.0.145.221 returns : 3717267457 while it should return : 16814557 –  MonsterMMORPG Dec 21 '12 at 22:24
    
it does not even work with ipv4 check my above reply –  MonsterMMORPG Dec 21 '12 at 22:27
    
Maybe you need NetworkToHostOrder? –  dtb Dec 21 '12 at 22:27
    
how to use it ? i tried several combinations but does not accept ip as parameter –  MonsterMMORPG Dec 21 '12 at 22:29

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