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I want to figure out what profile.views happened on what user visit. The users are uniquely identified by the pair uid,state. This data is stored in two data frames.

visits = data.frame(id=2001:2004, uid=c(1001,1002,1001,1001), state=c('CA','CA','CA','MA'), ts=c(51,52,53,54))
profile.views = data.frame(id=3001:3004, uid=c(1001,1003,1002,1001), state=c('CA','CA','CA','CA'), ts=c(51,57,59,59))

> visits
    id  uid state ts
1 2001 1001    CA 51
2 2002 1002    CA 52
3 2003 1001    CA 53
4 2004 1001    MA 54

> profile.views
id  uid state ts
1 3001 1001    CA 51
2 3002 1003    CA 57
3 3003 1002    CA 59
4 3004 1001    CA 59

For each profile.view, I want to figure out which visit it came from. This is done by looking back to the most recent visit with a matching uid and state that has a ts less than or equal to the ts on the profile.views row.

Here are the results I would want (in some form):

profile.views[1,] came from visits[1,]

profile.views[2,] did not come from any visit (this could be caused by a data recording error)

profile.views[3,] came from visits[2,]

profile.views[4,] came from visits[3,]

Does anyone know a good way to do this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A faster data.table way, which matches a profile view to a visit ID:

visits = data.frame(id=2001:2004, uid=c(1001,1002,1001,1001), state=c('CA','CA','CA','MA'), ts=c(51,52,53,54))
profile.views = data.frame(id=3001:3004, uid=c(1001,1003,1002,1001), state=c('CA','CA','CA','CA'), ts=c(51,57,59,59))
visits <- data.table(visits)
profile.views <- data.table(profile.views)
setkey(visits,uid,state,ts)
#orders columns so that joins are on first three columns
setcolorder(profile.views,c("uid","state","ts","id"))
##set names to avoid name collision
setnames(profile.views,c("uid","state","view.ts","view.id"))
##rolling join
visits[profile.views,roll=TRUE]
    # uid state ts   id view.id
# 1: 1001    CA 51 2001    3001
# 2: 1003    CA 57   NA    3002
# 3: 1002    CA 59 2002    3003
# 4: 1001    CA 59 2003    3004
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+1 but the setcolorder and setnames aren't needed :) Easier and faster to key i too: setkey(profile.views,uid,state,ts). –  Matt Dowle Dec 22 '12 at 22:05
    
That was my first guess, but I got an error I don't understand: Error in `[.data.table`(visits, profile.views, roll = TRUE) : Attempting roll join on factor column i.state. Only integer, double or character colums may be roll joined. I'm running R 2.15.2 and data.table 1.8.6. –  Blue Magister Dec 23 '12 at 4:58
2  
Oh dear, yes it's an error check gone awry. Will fix, apologies. Whenever the key columns are out of order and a non last join column is a factor. In the meantime could change from factor to character: profile.views[,state:=as.character(state)], visits[,state:=as.character(state)] too, before setting the keys again. Bug filed here. Thanks! –  Matt Dowle Dec 24 '12 at 13:31
1  
@dubois The data.table way is meant to be faster both computationally and intuitively with the commands. I can think of a way to do this in base R using merge and aggregate, using the same method as the sqldf example. –  Blue Magister Dec 27 '12 at 3:53
1  
Bug fixed and test added now in 1.8.7. –  Matt Dowle Dec 27 '12 at 13:36

Using SQL-style syntax with sqldf:

library(sqldf)
sqldf("
SELECT a.id, a.uid, a.state, a.ts, MAX(b.ts) AS visit_ts
FROM \"profile.views\" AS a
LEFT OUTER JOIN visits AS b
ON a.uid = b.uid
AND a.state = b.state
AND a.ts >= b.ts
GROUP BY a.id, a.uid, a.state, a.ts
ORDER BY a.id
")
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Nice, I didn't know about this sqldf package! –  dubois Dec 27 '12 at 3:03

Here's a data.table solution. There are a few things that can probably be done better, but here's a first pass at it.

library(data.table)
visits <- data.table(visits)
profile.views <- data.table(profile.views)
##renames some columns to avoid name collision
##there's probably a better solution to this
setnames(profile.views,c("id","ts"),c("view.id","view.ts"))
setkey(visits,uid,state)
setkey(profile.views,uid,state)
##outer joins visits to profile.views by uid and state
##leaving NA if a row in profile.views has no matches
#visits[profile.views] 
##filters out rows where views happen before visits
#visits[profile.views][view.ts >= ts | is.na(ts)] 
##picks the latest visit timestamp by view
visits[profile.views][view.ts >= ts | is.na(ts), 
  list(visit.ts=max(ts)), 
  by=list(view.id,uid,state,view.ts)][order(view.id)]
#    view.id  uid state view.ts visit.ts
# 1:    3001 1001    CA      51       51
# 2:    3002 1003    CA      57       NA
# 3:    3003 1002    CA      59       52
# 4:    3004 1001    CA      59       53
share|improve this answer
    
+1 but this is what 'roll=TRUE' is for, a major feature of data.table that is much faster than SQL. –  Matt Dowle Dec 22 '12 at 8:17
    
Ah, shucks. I'll have another go at it. –  Blue Magister Dec 22 '12 at 15:56

Using base R's merge and aggregate:

visits = data.frame(id=2001:2004, uid=c(1001,1002,1001,1001), state=c('CA','CA','CA','MA'), ts=c(51,52,53,54))
profile.views = data.frame(id=3001:3004, uid=c(1001,1003,1002,1001), state=c('CA','CA','CA','CA'), ts=c(51,57,59,59))
##merges data frames based on uid and state
newdf.merged <- merge(visits,profile.views, by=c("uid","state"),all.y=TRUE)
##puts unmatched rows into another dataset
newdf.na <- with(newdf,newdf[is.na(ts.x),])
##filters views that happened after visits (like WHERE)
newdf.filter <- with(newdf,newdf[ts.y >= ts.x,])
##aggregates using the max function, selecting max id and ts
newdf.agg <- aggregate(cbind(id.y,ts.y) ~ uid + state + id.x + ts.x, data = newdf.filter, FUN = max)
##merges aggregated result and na rows
newdf.final <- rbind(newdf.agg,newdf.na)
##optional ordering step
newdf.final <- newdf.final[with(newdf.final,order(uid,state,id.x)),]
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