Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to create multiple async calls like

IList<Task> Ts = new List<Task>();
Ts.Add(GetInformationFromServer(ID));

But I do not what do await in the thread, I am calling from

So it should be possible to do like this (one of the old ways, but are there a new one?), from another call

GetInformation(string ID) {
   while (!Finish) {
      Thread.Sleep(100);
   }
   return _Information.First(a=>a.ID==ID);
 }

I could of course save the Tasks in a variable, but how can I start them? And how do I get the status?
I think I can await them in another thread, but how can I check if they are finish? Should I implement it on my own?
And how do I start them (should I just use Task.WhenAll without await)?

UPDATE

I figured out, I have to implement my own way, so the answer is kind of this way, but I need to use Task instead of Func

/// The executed elements
private IList<T> _ExecutedElements;

/// The Stack over the elements to be executed
private Stack<T> _ExecutingElements;

/// The method to be runned
private Func<object, Task<T>> _Method;

/// Should the while-loop start?
private bool _Running;

/// The Task
private Task<T> _Task;

/// Construct the class
/// <param name="Method">The function to be executed</param>
public MultiAsync(Func<object, T> Method) {
   _Method = Method;
}

/// Add an element
/// <param name="Item">The item to be added</param>
public void AddItem(T Element) {
   _ExecutingElements.Push(Element);
}

/// Execute the method
public async void ExecuteAsync() {

   // Set it to start running
   _Running = true;

   // While there are elements left
   while (_ExecutingElements.Count > 0) {

      // Check if it is not running, and if it isn't break out
      if (!_Running) { break; }

      // The current element
      T Element = default(T);

      // Pop out the element, that has not been runned through
      do { Element = _ExecutingElements.Pop(); }
      while (!_ExecutedElements.Contains(Element));

      // Check if there is an element, and if there is execute the method and await it
      if (Element != default(T)) {
         await ExecuteMethodAsync(Element);
      }
   }
}

/// Execute the item
/// <param name="Item">The item to be executed</param>
/// <returns>The executed item (due to reflection in FillInformation, the Item is filled)</returns>
public async Task<T> ExecuteItemAsync(T Item) {

   // Check if the item has not been executed, and if it is not executed
   if (!_ExecutedElements.Contains(Item)) {

      // Stop the while-loop
      _Running = false;

      // Check if the Task is running, and if it is await it
      if (_Task != default(Task) && !_Task.IsCompleted && !_Task.IsFaulted) {
         await _Task;
      }

      // Execute the method using the specific item
      await ExecuteMethodAsync(Item);
   }

   // Start the while-loop
   ExecuteAsync();

   // Return the element
   return Item;
}

/// Execute the method
/// <param name="Item">The item to run</param>
/// <returns>The Task to be executed</returns>
private async Task ExecuteMethodAsync(T Item) {

   // Set the Task
   _Task = _Method.Invoke(Item)

   // Start the task
   T Element = await _Task;

   // Add the item to the List
   _ExecutedElements.Add(Element);

   // Fill the information
   FillInformation(Element);
}

The call is like this

private async void FillTasksAsync(IEnumerable<Model.Task> Tasks) {
   _InfoLoader = new MultiAsync<Model.Task>(Tsk => { return GetTaskAsync(Tsk); });

   foreach (var Tsk in Tasks) {
      _InfoLoader.AddItem(Tsk);
   }
}
share|improve this question
    
Can you describe more about your problem? Are you using multiple tasks to split up a problem? Do the threads need to synchronize on some state? In general, it's better not to sleep in your background thread, but instead wait to kick off the task until the work is ready. –  Scott Wegner Dec 21 '12 at 22:51
    
Yes, I am using the async calls to split up a problem. And they are not going to synchronize, as they are working on different objects. I could perhaps use Threads or a ThreadPool and then join them to be notified when they are ready –  The87Boy Dec 21 '12 at 22:53
1  
Why don't you want to await? Using await is the cleanest and best-supported solution. –  Stephen Cleary Dec 21 '12 at 23:01
    
Cause I don't need it at that moment, but if a user chooses the item in a list the information should be shown quickly, so I want to download it in the background –  The87Boy Dec 21 '12 at 23:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have a blog post that discusses asynchronous initialization, which sounds like what you need. It's derived from an original idea by Stephen Toub.

In this case, you could use:

List<AsyncLazy<string>> Ts = ...
Ts.Add(new AsyncLazy<string>(() => GetServerStringAsync(ID));

To start one downloading, you can do:

Ts[0].Start();

And when you need it, you can do:

var result = await Ts[0];

which will (asynchronously) wait for it to finish downloading if it hasn't already. If it has already, then you'll get the result immediately.

share|improve this answer
    
So I need to add all items to the List and then use start on all or? I thought, I could do it once, but then I think I should implement my own class, which must be the result. I am thinking about one thing and maybe you are the right to answer this question: Are Task.WhenAll executed one at a time or multiple? –  The87Boy Dec 21 '12 at 23:17
    
You'll need to start each one. Task.WhenAll is different; it returns a Task that is completed when all the tasks passed to it have completed. –  Stephen Cleary Dec 21 '12 at 23:54
    
Okay, so it combines all the Tasks to one? <br /> If nobody has come up with an better answer tomorrow, I think I am better off creating my own class, and then I will need some response on it for performance –  The87Boy Dec 21 '12 at 23:58
    
It returns a Task that is completed when all tasks passed to it have completed. You could look at it as a kind of "combination". Is there some reason that AsyncLazy wouldn't work for you? –  Stephen Cleary Dec 22 '12 at 0:34
    
As I see it you should call the start-method, when each task is finish –  The87Boy Dec 22 '12 at 15:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.