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Given a C++11 function:

X f(A, B, C);

Is there anyway from within this function:

template<typename T>
void g(T t)
{
    ...
}

Called as follows:

g(f);

to determine:

  • the number of parameters of f
  • the type of parameter i of f
  • the return type of f

...

template<typename F>
void g(F f)
{
    constexpr size_t n = num_params<F>::n; // 3
    return_type<F>::type x; // X
    tuple<param_types<F>::type...> a; // tuple<A, B, C>
}

?

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Are you looking for the thing that __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ in gcc and other compilers? –  Mats Petersson Dec 21 '12 at 22:59
    
@MatsPetersson: __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ is a string literal produced at preprocessing-time - I need to use the types as I would template type parameters, not just print their names. –  Andrew Tomazos Dec 21 '12 at 23:02
    
The intention of your question is not entirely clear (as expressed, it's entirely possible you have a good idea in your head - I suffer from that quite often!) –  Mats Petersson Dec 21 '12 at 23:03
    
@MatsPetersson: The final example in my post is illustrative of what I am trying to do. –  Andrew Tomazos Dec 21 '12 at 23:06
    
No, it doesn't explain WHY you need to do this, which is what I'm trying to figure out - it's just part of "how do I do this". Imagine you wanting to change a tyre on your car, so you go to a mechanic asking "How do I losen the wheelnuts on my car", and he tells you which spanner to use. Then after your car has fallen to the ground becuse one wheel has fallen off, you go ask how you get the new wheel on, and you get told that you need to jack the car up, but you can't because the front of the car is now too low to get the jack under it... Sorry, if that's a bit obvious. –  Mats Petersson Dec 21 '12 at 23:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Sure:

template <typename R, typename ...Args>
void g(R(&f)(Args...))
{
    typedef R return_type;
    unsigned int const n_args = sizeof...(Args);

    // ...
}

Usage:

int foo(char, bool);

g(foo);
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Will this work with lamdbas bind expressions and std::function as input? Whats the meaning of the '&' symbol in front of f? –  Andrew Tomazos Dec 21 '12 at 22:57
    
The above code works for actual functions. It doesn't work for function objects, though. For function object it can't work, in general, because it may have multiple function call operators and there isn't sufficient context to determine which one is to be called. –  Dietmar Kühl Dec 21 '12 at 23:00
    
You can provide an overload for std::function just as well, i.e. g(std::function<R(Args...)> const & f)... Lambdas will then work via implicit conversion. –  Kerrek SB Dec 21 '12 at 23:01
    
If I only provide the std::function overload will actual functions bind to it also? –  Andrew Tomazos Dec 21 '12 at 23:03
1  
@AndrewTomazosFathomlingCorps: They would (but surely you could be testing this yourself?!), but at a non-negligible cost. I'd keep the straight function overload. –  Kerrek SB Dec 21 '12 at 23:04

Something I had worked on that does what you want I think -- it is however limited to functors that define at most one function call operator (lambdas fit this restriction). It also works on MSVC 2012 CTP.

namespace detail {
    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    //! Select between function pointer types
    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    template <typename T>
    struct callable_helper_ptr;

    //! non-member functions
    template <typename R, typename... Args>
    struct callable_helper_ptr<R (*)(Args...)> {
        typedef void                object_t;
        typedef R                   result_t;
        typedef std::tuple<Args...> args_t;
    };

    //! member functions
    template <typename R, typename O, typename... Args>
    struct callable_helper_ptr<R (O::*)(Args...)> {
        typedef O                   object_t;
        typedef R                   result_t;
        typedef std::tuple<Args...> args_t;
    };

    //! const member functions
    template <typename R, typename O, typename... Args>
    struct callable_helper_ptr<R (O::*)(Args...) const> {
        typedef O                   object_t;
        typedef R                   result_t;
        typedef std::tuple<Args...> args_t;
    };

    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    //! Select between function pointers and functors
    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    template <typename T, typename is_ptr = typename std::is_pointer<T>::type>
    struct callable_helper;

    //! specialization for functors (and lambdas)
    template <typename T>
    struct callable_helper<T, std::false_type> {
        typedef callable_helper_ptr<decltype(&T::operator())> type;
    };

    //! specialization for function pointers
    template <typename T>
    struct callable_helper<T, std::true_type> {
        typedef callable_helper_ptr<T> type;
    };
} //namespace detail

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
//! defines the various details of a callable object T
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
template <typename T>
struct callable_traits {
    typedef typename detail::callable_helper<T>::type::object_t object_t;
    typedef typename detail::callable_helper<T>::type::result_t result_t;
    typedef typename detail::callable_helper<T>::type::args_t   args_t;

    template <unsigned N>
    struct arg : public std::tuple_element<N, args_t> {};
};

And my write up on the process behind writing if anyone is interested: http://bkentel.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/defining-a-traits-type-for-callable-objects/

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