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I have this HTML:

<div id="container">
    <article></article>
    <article></article>
    <article></article>
    <article></article>
    <article></article>
</div>

and this CSS:

#container {
    overflow: hidden
}

article {
    float:left;
    height: 200px;
    width: 200px;
    background-color: red;
    margin: 5px;
}

​ ​I want to center the #container without specifying a width. Is it possible?
Here is the Fiddle.

Edit: I need the width of the #container to change to fit the articles. If the body is 450px width then there will be two articles per row, so the width of the container should be 400px aprox. If the body is 1100px width then ther will be five articles per row, so the width of the container should be 1000px aprox.

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Something like this: jsfiddle? –  sooper Dec 21 '12 at 23:22
    
@sooper, those have width... didn't the OP ask for something without a specific width? –  Sparky Dec 21 '12 at 23:23
1  
If you want the article elements to be aligned to the left, then what's the point in centring #container without a width? If you want them on the left you'd add text-align:left to #container but then you're back to square one. –  sooper Dec 21 '12 at 23:34
1  
sigh.. can you draw us a picture? Why would it matter if #container is centred since you're not defining a width? Even if you make it an inline-block you would get the same result. In order for the article elements to appear as if they're aligned to the left, then you need to give #container a width. –  sooper Dec 21 '12 at 23:45
1  
@pomber, that clears up nothing. The code you posted is already doing what you're asking about. The container is in the center, full width of window, but still in the center. See why you're not making sense? –  Sparky Dec 21 '12 at 23:45

5 Answers 5

You could try something like this (jsfiddle):

HTML:

<html>
    <body>
        <div id="container">
            <article></article>
            <article></article>
            <article></article>
            <article></article>
            <article></article>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>​

CSS:

html, body { margin: 0; padding: 0; }
body { text-align: center; }

#container {
    overflow: hidden;
    margin: 0 auto;
    width: 90%;
    text-align: left;
}

article {
    display:inline-block;
    height: 200px;
    width: 200px;
    background-color: red;
    margin: 5px;
}
​
share|improve this answer
1  
This is a very good answer, if that's what he wants. It's not yet clear. –  Sparky Dec 21 '12 at 23:30
    
+1 for dealing with a non-sense question with a sensible answer. –  Sparky Dec 21 '12 at 23:35
    
@Sparky thanks (^^) –  sooper Dec 21 '12 at 23:37

The following method works, however it is a little mad. It's rather annoying that this isn't something that CSS can handle easily:

fiddle

http://jsfiddle.net/C4fbX/

method

This method works on the basic idea posted by Nick, and uses this method to then position a left floating system... which fixes the problem where you always end up with center aligned elements within the centered container.

So instead of:

[][][][]
  [][]

You get:

[][][][]
[][]

The following stipulations are required:

  1. You need to include as many placeholder elements as you have articles. The method uses these to calculate where to indent the articles from. This also means that the width and horizontal margin/padding of the placeholder elements has to match that of the articles.
  2. The articles need to be placed within the first placeholder.
  3. In order to get around the whitespace issue with regard to inline-block, the font-size and line-height are zeroed out, which means they have to be manually set again for the articles. You can get around this by removing these zeroed attributes from the css and just making sure your placeholder markup doesn't have any whitespace.
  4. I very much doubt this will work in older browsers - but seems to in the current modern ones.
  5. Relying on position absolute means that your articles wont take up their usual space in the document, so you'd have to account for this in your design or set a fixed height on your #container element

mark up

<div class="container">
  <div class="placeholder">
    <div class="position">
      <article>a</article>
      <article>b</article>
      <article>c</article>    
      <article>d</article>
      <article>e</article>
    </div>
  </div>
  <div class="placeholder"></div>
  <div class="placeholder"></div>
  <div class="placeholder"></div>
  <div class="placeholder"></div>
</div>

css

.container {
  font-size: 0;
  line-height: 0;
  text-align: center;
}

.placeholder {
  display: inline-block;
  width: 200px;
  margin-left: 5px;
  margin-right: 5px;
  height: 0px;
}

.position {
  position: absolute;
}

article {
 font-size: 12pt;
 line-height: 1.2em;
 float: left;
 margin: 5px;
 width: 200px;
 height: 100px;
 background: red;    
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for understanding the problem –  pomber Dec 22 '12 at 20:03

Do you mean centre the articles within the container, whilst allowing them still to wrap? In which case (jsfiddle):

#container {
    text-align: center;
}

article {
    display:inline-block;
    height: 200px;
    width: 200px;
    background-color: red;
    margin: 5px;
}
​
share|improve this answer
    
With this approach you'll need to warn about inline-block taking into account surrounding whitespace around the article elements (which causes unwanted margins). +1 though as this is pretty much the best you can achieve with regards to what the OP is asking... unless you possibly look at using flexbox. You do end up with centered articles too though, annoyingy, rather than having them left aligned. –  pebbl Dec 22 '12 at 0:51

Take out float: left; and add margin:auto;

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

After considering several options, I found that using media queries is the simpler way to do it.

In this case it will be something like this:

@media (max-width: 420px) {
    #container {
        width: 210px;
    }
}

@media (min-width: 420px) and (max-width: 630px) {
    #container {
        width: 420px;
    }
}

@media (min-width: 630px){
    #container {
        width: 630px;
    }
}

Here is the fiddle.

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