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I need my AsyncTask to go through around 100,000 numbers and retrive data for every each of that number. It works fine when there is 1,000 parameter submitted, and works with even 10,000 parameters, but is very slow and laggy. First I was submitting the array of all numbers to execute but noticed that when I go over about 60,000 numbers I sometimes get RejectedExecutionException, but usually it just exits my application without any Exeptions or errors.

This was the code in this case:

for(int i = 0; i < 70000; i++){
    numbers[i] = i;
}

new NetTask().execute(numbers);

and also AsyncTask in this case:

public class NetTask extends AsyncTask<Integer, String, String>
    {
        @Override
        protected String doInBackground(Integer... params)
        {   
            for (Integer number : params) {
                    try {
                        // DO NETWORK STUFF
                        publishProgress(number+" Successful");
                    } catch (Exception ex) {
                        publishProgress(number+" Failed");
                    }
            }
            return "";
        }
    }

then I read somewhere that if there is need to execute task with parameters of amount like this, then its better to handle it inside single AsyncTask for example by looping over every value, because the code I used previously creates huge amount of AsyncTasks. So I tried submitting the numbers in single string devided by ":" and then in AsyncTask chop them back into single numbers and perform the task with them, but still got similar results as previous attempt.

Here is the AsyncTask in this case:

public class NetTask extends AsyncTask<String, String, String>
    {
        @Override
        protected String doInBackground(String... params)
        {


            for (String line : params) {

                String[] numbers = line.split(":");

                for (int i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++) {
                    int number = Integer.parseInt(numbers[i]);
                    try {
                        // DO NETWORK STUFF
                        publishProgress(number+" Successful");
                    } catch (Exception ex) {
                        publishProgress(number+" Failed");
                    }
                }
            }
            return "";
        }

does anyone know any better and WORKING approach for achieving what I am after for?

share|improve this question
    
"then I read somewhere that if there is need to execute tasks of amount like this, then its better to handle it inside single AsyncTask for example by looping over every value, because the code I used previously creates huge amount of AsyncTasks" -- not based on the code that you have listed. You only call new NetTask() once. Hence, you only create one NetTask. You are passing 70,000 parameters, which is not a good idea, and the task itself is perfectly capable of counting to 70,000. Please post a stack trace of the exception(s) you get from your first approach. –  CommonsWare Dec 21 '12 at 23:40
1  
Why are you processing 100,000 numbers individually? What is the server side doing that you can't just batch it up? I'm also wondering if your server side can't handle a huge string that you are sending over. –  Morrison Chang Dec 21 '12 at 23:40
    
@CommonsWare if it is as you say, then why my second approach doesn't work? I only submit one String parameter to it. –  Rohit Malish Dec 21 '12 at 23:44
    
@RohitMalish: I have no idea, because you have not published any stack traces, so that we can determine what is causing the exception. –  CommonsWare Dec 21 '12 at 23:46
    
@CommonsWare I rarely get any error, program just exits. I few times have gotten RejectedExecutionException but I can't seem to get it anymore. –  Rohit Malish Dec 21 '12 at 23:48
show 2 more comments

1 Answer

So what is the right way then to do such a big amount of tasks?

First, as Mr. Chang points out, this really needs to be one task, or a few tasks. Each task should "retrieve data" about a lot of "numbers" in one shot. For example, if "retrieve data" means "make a Web service call", doing 100,000 Web service calls, consuming perhaps 100MB of bandwidth, is beyond ridiculous. Or, if "retrieve data" means "run a query against a SQLite database", use the IN operator to "retrieve data" about lots of "numbers" in one database operation rather than trying to do 100,000 individual database queries.

Moreover, assuming that you actually care about this "data" that you have chosen to "retrieve", an AsyncTask may not be the appropriate engine. If this work should occur regardless of what happens in the UI layer, use an IntentService instead, as that can run independently of any of your activities.

Let's pretend, though, that having an AsyncTask do 100,000 things is actually appropriate for some reason. I have never tried passing 100,000 parameters to a varargs-style method. It's possible this performs OK. If the numbers are sequential, you would only really need to pass the first and last values, and the AsyncTask can count quite nicely. Or, if you really do need to pass 100,000 distinct numbers to the AsyncTask, and if Traceview indicates that passing 100,000 parameters to execute() is bad, create an ArrayList<Integer> and pass them that way.

share|improve this answer
    
in this case "retrieving data" is scanning ports and retriveing their state. –  Rohit Malish Dec 22 '12 at 0:19
    
@RohitMalish: Um, OK. You will need to experiment with how many simultaneous threads is the right number for your port scanner, in terms of achieving quality throughput. Let's call T the number of threads you want. Either create T AsyncTask instances, each processing 1/Tth of the ports, or create your own ThreadPoolExecutor that handles T simultaneous tasks. Under the covers, AsyncTask uses ThreadPoolExecutor, and you can choose to use it yourself if appropriate. Since port numbers are sequential, you do not need to pass the numbers into the tasks, just the start and end of the ranges. –  CommonsWare Dec 22 '12 at 0:24
    
@CommonsWare how do you know all this ? are you in the team that wrote android os ? –  tony9099 Sep 24 '13 at 15:21
    
@tony9099: "how do you know all this ?" -- sorry, but I am not sure what "all this" is. "are you in the team that wrote android os ? " -- no, but I have read relevant bits of the Android source code, since it is open and available. I have also been involved in Android app development for over five years (as of the time of this writing), and you pick up stuff along the way. –  CommonsWare Sep 24 '13 at 15:51
    
@CommonsWare 'all this' = I have seen your answers on various topics regarding android on SO, and they are quite impressive. 320k points isnt a joke. highly fascinating. keep up the good work ! –  tony9099 Sep 24 '13 at 15:54
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