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Most of my programming prior to Python was in C++ or Matlab. I don't have a degree in CS (almost completed a PhD in physics), but have done some courses and a good amount of actual programming. Now, I'm taking an algorithms course on Coursera (excellent course, by the way, with a professor from Stanford). I decided to implement the homeworks in Python. However, sometimes I find myself wanting things the language does not so easily support. I'm very used to creating classes and objects for things in C++ just to group together data (i.e. when there are no methods). In Python however, where you can add fields on the fly, what I basically end up wanting all the time are Matlab structs. I think this is possibly a sign I am not using good style and doing things the "Pythonic" way.

Underneath is my implementation of a union-find data structure (for Kruskal's algorithm). Although the implementation is relatively short and works well (there isn't much error checking), there are a few odd points. For instance, my code assumes that the data originally passed in to the union-find is a list of objects. However, if a list of explicit pieces of data are passed in instead (i.e. a list of ints), the code fails. Is there some much clearer, more Pythonic way to implement this? I have tried to google this, but most examples are very simple and relate more to procedural code (i.e. the "proper" way to do a for loop in python).

class UnionFind:
    def __init__(self,data):
        self.data = data

        for d in self.data:
            d.size = 1
            d.leader = d
            d.next = None
            d.last = d

    def find(self,element):
        return element.leader

    def union(self,leader1,leader2):
        if leader1.size >= leader2.size:
            newleader = leader1
            oldleader = leader2
        else:
            newleader = leader2
            oldleader = leader1

        newleader.size = leader1.size + leader2.size

        d = oldleader
        while d != None:
            d.leader = newleader
            d = d.next

        newleader.last.next = oldleader
        newleader.last = oldleader.last

        del(oldleader.size)
        del(oldleader.last)    
share|improve this question
    
What are you trying to achieve? At first glance, some kind of tree, but then, not so sure... –  Jon Clements Dec 22 '12 at 0:11
    
Well its not strange that the code fails if you pass in a list of integeres since they don't have the attributes that the code expects (the while loop in the constructor) this is one of the "problems" with dynamic typing. To solve that you could always check the type with "type()". –  Daniel Figueroa Dec 22 '12 at 0:16
    
Hey Jon, can you clarify your question? I wrote that this is a union-find (disjoint set) data structure for use in Kruskal's algorithm. Daniel, I don't find it strange. I was just trying to find a clean way to make it work. It's non-trivial because you need to be able to pass in pointers that have access to the defined fields, somehow. –  Nir Friedman Dec 22 '12 at 0:25
    
You should include your definition for the data parameter for this class. –  Droogans Dec 22 '12 at 0:35
    
Is the question whether data should be strictly typed, or rather how to handle/support multiple data types in the most pythonic way? –  Nisan.H Dec 22 '12 at 0:37

5 Answers 5

Generally speaking, doing this sort of thing Pythonically means that you try to make your code not care what is given to it, at least not any more than it really needs to.

Let's take your particular example of the union-find algorithm. The only thing that the union-find algorithm actually does with the values you pass to it is compare them for equality. So to make a generally useful UnionFind class, your code shouldn't rely on the values it receives having any behavior other than equality testing. In particular, you shouldn't rely on being able to assign arbitrary attributes to the values.

The way I would suggest getting around this is to have UnionFind use wrapper objects which hold the given values and any attributes you need to make the algorithm work. You can use namedtuple as suggested by another answer, or make a small wrapper class. When an element is added to the UnionFind, you first wrap it in one of these objects, and use the wrapper object to store the attributes leader, size, etc. The only time you access the thing being wrapped is to check whether it is equal to another value.

In practice, at least in this case, it should be safe to assume that your values are hashable, so that you can use them as keys in a Python dictionary to find the wrapper object corresponding to a given value. Of course, not all objects in Python are necessarily hashable, but those that are not are relatively rare and it's going to be a lot more work to make a data structure that is able to handle those.

share|improve this answer
    
I really like namedTuples, I just find it rather ugly to change their values (via the replace function). –  Nir Friedman Dec 22 '12 at 16:56

The more pythonic way is to avoid tedious objects if you don't have to.

class UnionFind(object):
    def __init__(self, members=10, data=None):
        """union-find data structure for Kruskal's algorithm
        members are ignored if data is provided
        """
        if not data:
            self.data = [self.default_data() for i in range(members)]
            for d in self.data:
                d.size   = 1
                d.leader = d
                d.next   = None
                d.last   = d
        else:
            self.data = data

    def default_data(self):
        """create a starting point for data"""
        return Data(**{'last': None, 'leader':None, 'next': None, 'size': 1})

    def find(self, element):
        return element.leader

    def union(self, leader1, leader2):
        if leader2.leader is leader1:
            return
        if leader1.size >= leader2.size:
            newleader = leader1
            oldleader = leader2
        else:
            newleader = leader2
            oldleader = leader1

        newleader.size = leader1.size + leader2.size

        d = oldleader
        while d is not None:
            d.leader = newleader
            d = d.next

        newleader.last.next = oldleader
        newleader.last = oldleader.last

        oldleader.size = 0
        oldleader.last = None

class Data(object):
    def __init__(self, **data_dict):
        """convert a data member dict into an object"""
        self.__dict__.update(**data_dict)
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice. Still not sure about the purpose of 'id' though. Could you explain that? I think I might switch to something very similar. The only thing I would add is probably an optional flag so that a user can create a dictionary with other entries (i.e. 'data'), and still have the constructor initialize the default state (all entries disjoint). I must admit, I am biased against dictionaries; their syntax is very unwieldy compared to structs. Do you just get over this eventually? Thanks for your help. –  Nir Friedman Dec 22 '12 at 1:28
    
Ok I changed it. You can turn a dictionary into an object pretty trivially in Python. –  Droogans Dec 22 '12 at 2:00
    
Attributes added to objects ("structs") are difficult to enumerate. You can't be sure whether they are attributes you set, methods from a superclass, descriptor/property magic, etc. If I have a well-defined structure with property names known in advance I use a tuple or namedtuple. Otherwise if I have an index-like structure I use a dict, which privide easy and reliable enumeration. –  Francis Avila Dec 22 '12 at 2:40
    
Francis, I would like to use a namedtuple, I just find the syntax for replacing values very annoying. –  Nir Friedman Dec 22 '12 at 16:58

One option is to use dictionaries to store the information you need about a data item, rather than attributes on the item directly. For instance, rather than referring to d.size you could refer to size[d] (where size is a dict instance). This requires that your data items be hashable, but they don't need to allow attributes to be assigned on them.

Here's a straightforward translation of your current code to use this style:

class UnionFind:
    def __init__(self,data):
        self.data = data
        self.size = {d:1 for d in data}
        self.leader = {d:d for d in data}
        self.next = {d:None for d in data}
        self.last = {d:d for d in data}

    def find(self,element):
        return self.leader[element]

    def union(self,leader1,leader2):
        if self.size[leader1] >= self.size[leader2]:
            newleader = leader1
            oldleader = leader2
        else:
            newleader = leader2
            oldleader = leader1

        self.size[newleader] = self.size[leader1] + self.size[leader2]

        d = oldleader
        while d != None:
            self.leader[d] = newleader
            d = self.next[d]

        self.next[self.last[newleader]] = oldleader
        self.last[newleader] = self.last[oldleader]

A minimal test case:

>>> uf = UnionFind(list(range(100)))
>>> uf.find(10)
10
>>> uf.find(20)
20
>>> uf.union(10,20)
>>> uf.find(10)
10
>>> uf.find(20)
10

Beyond this, you could also consider changing your implementation a bit to require less initialization. Here's a version that doesn't do any initialization (it doesn't even need to know the set of data it's going to work on). It uses path compression and union-by-rank rather than always maintaining an up-to-date leader value for all members of a set. It should be asymptotically faster than your current code, especially if you're doing a lot of unions:

class UnionFind:
    def __init__(self):
        self.rank = {}
        self.parent = {}

    def find(self, element):
        if element not in self.parent: # leader elements are not in `parent` dict
            return element
        leader = self.find(self.parent[element]) # search recursively
        self.parent[element] = leader # compress path by saving leader as parent
        return leader

    def union(self, leader1, leader2):
        rank1 = self.rank.get(leader1,1)
        rank2 = self.rank.get(leader2,1)

        if rank1 > rank2: # union by rank
            self.parent[leader2] = leader1
        elif rank2 > rank1:
            self.parent[leader1] = leader2
        else: # ranks are equal
            self.parent[leader2] = leader1 # favor leader1 arbitrarily
            self.rank[leader1] = rank1+1 # increment rank
share|improve this answer

For checking if an argument is of the expected type, use the built-in isinstance() function:

if not isinstance(leader1, UnionFind):
    raise ValueError('leader1 must be a UnionFind instance')

Additionally, it is a good habit to add docstrings to functions, classes and member functions. Such a docstring for a function or method should describe what it does, what arguments are to be passed to it and if applicable what is returned and which exceptions can be raised.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't help the questioner at all. Instances of types created by namedtuple are immutable, so you can't update their values, which the UnionFind data structure requires. Indeed, working around issues with immutable values is exactly the problem the question was posed about! –  Blckknght Dec 22 '12 at 6:23

I'm guessing that the indentation issues here are just simple errors with inputting the code into SO. Could you possibly create a subclass of a simple, built in data type? For instance, you can create a sub-class of the list data type by putting the datatype in parenthesis:

class UnionFind(list):
'''extends list object'''
share|improve this answer
1  
It doesn't really make sense to subclass another data structure unless you are really going to use a significant part of its functionality, does it? In this case, union-find has only two operations and neither overlap with the simple data structures. The list in the union-find is just used for storage of the objects (pointers, really); this data structure does all of its work by adding on pointers to the existing list and manipulating those pointers. –  Nir Friedman Dec 22 '12 at 0:27
    
True. Unfortunately, SO only gives me the option to answer at this point and not to comment. Because that wasn't really an 'answer' per se, as much as it was a comment. I do appreciate the input on your response, I'm a beginner and it was definitely a helpful read. Thanks! –  Sandwich Heat Dec 23 '12 at 4:57

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