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I have the following struct and I'm trying to send over the network to another application

 struct protocol
  {

     char protocol;
     char field1;
     char field2;
     char field3;
     char field4;
     char field5;
     char field6;
     char field7;
     char field8;
     char msg_id;
     char msg_length;
     char *msg;

  };

The problem I'm having is that I'm not sure how to send this struct over the network as there is a pointer pointing to a string in it, and memcpy the struct to buffer won't work, is the below the only way to do it?

memcpy (buffer, protocol->protocol, char)
memcpy (buffer, protocol->field1, char)
...
memcpy (buffer, protocol->msg, protocol->length)

then send the buffer

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How are you serializing this struct? –  RonaldBarzell Dec 22 '12 at 0:11
    
I'm not, how should I do that ? –  user1832809 Dec 22 '12 at 0:12
    
It depends on your sender and receiver. Basically any data you send will need to become a stream of bytes, which as you pointed out, means that embedded pointers need to be resolved. The thing is, how you turn it into a stream depends on what the other side expects, as it will do the re-assembling. –  RonaldBarzell Dec 22 '12 at 0:14
    
Ok I see what you're saying, so basically copying the data to another var like I mentioned with memcpy is serializing the struct, correct? –  user1832809 Dec 22 '12 at 0:15
    
Yes. Serializing is basically that, but there are many ways of serializing, and that's where the protocols come in. –  RonaldBarzell Dec 22 '12 at 0:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You will need to serialize the structure into a buffer of some sort. Your sequence of copies is correct in concept only; there are a myriad details to resolve:

char buffer[sizeof(struct protocol) + protocol->msg_length]; // Over-allocation

buffer[0] = protocol->protocol;
buffer[1] = protocol->field1;
...
buffer[8] = protocol->field8;
buffer[9] = protocol->msg_id;
buffer[10] = protocol->msg_len;
memcpy(&buffer[11], protocol->msg, protocol->msg_len);

Now you can write the correct length of buffer (11 + protocol->msg_len) to send.

This is particularly simple; there are no endian-ness issues to worry about. Generally, with multi-byte values like short or int or long long, you have to worry about the transmitted byte order.

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Yes, if you are sending to something that (may be) outside of your own process, that sort of marshalling or serializing is the only feasible way.

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thanks, so in this case if have a lot fields then a there will be a lot of memcpy which is not that practical, what is practical in this kind of application, do I need not to use struct in this case? –  user1832809 Dec 22 '12 at 0:19
    
Not sure how else you'd solve it. Obviously, there are other methods than memcpy, but somehow you need to take all your little bits of data and make one large one. As Jonathan Leffler shows below, you can memcpy only the big buffer. Or you could memcpy the entire struct except the last bit [relies on there not being gaps in the struct tho - say for instance you have an odd number of char followed by an int, you get a gap, which could be different from what the receiving side is taking!] If it's strings, rather than char, you could use sprintf to print the result into a buffer. –  Mats Petersson Dec 22 '12 at 0:25
    
I just added another answer, which may help... –  Mats Petersson Dec 22 '12 at 0:34

If you can restrict certain aspects of the data you're sending, such as "msg_len is never more than X bytes", you could do something like this:

#define MAX_MSG_LEN 1000
struct protocol
{
 char protocol;
 char field1;
 char field2;
 char field3;
 char field4;
 char field5;
 char field6;
 char field7;
 char field8;
 char msg_id;
 char msg_length;
 char msg[MAX_MESSAGE_LEN];
};

You'll need to calculate how much overhead there is before msg, and then use msg_length to determine the total size of the buffer you need to send.

Or, another method is:

struct protocol
{
 char protocol;
 char field1;
 char field2;
 char field3;
 char field4;
 char field5;
 char field6;
 char field7;
 char field8;
 char msg_id;
 char msg_length;
 char msg[1];
};

And then use struct procotol *msg_ptr = malloc(sizeof(struct protocol) + msg_len-1); when you need to form a message.

Both these methods will have the drawback that if you have "gaps" in the struct, you need to cope with that at the other end (which may have different rules for gaps, if it's compiled with a different compiler, for a different processor, or simply with different compiler switches)

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